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35J0 










ALBERT W. SMITH 
BROWSING LIBRARY 




CORNELL 
UNIVERSITY 






Cornell University Library 
PR 3510.A5M82 1921 

The poetical works of Robert Herrick, 
3 1924 012 961 623 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of tliis bool< is in 
tine Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924012961623 



THE POETICAL XVpRKS 

OF ■■'■■:: " ' ■ ■• ■ ' 

ROBERT HER RICK 



Oxfor4 University Pres^, Amen Houses Lpndon E,G^^ 

GLASGOW N£W YORK TORONTO MELBOURNK WELUNGTOK 

BOMBAY CALCUTTA MADRAS KARACHI 

CAPE TOWN I3ADAN NAIROBI ACCRA KUAXiA LUMPUR 



THE POETICAL WORKS 

OF 

ROBERT HERRICK 

EDITED BY F. W. MOORMAN 

WITH A PREFATORY NOTE 
BY PERCY SIMPSON 



.LONDON -^-^^^li;, 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS ' 

NEW YORK TORONTO ..I , t,dfS'^'^ 



{ ■ 



ROBERT HERRICK 
Baptised tt St. Vedast, Foster Lane, London . 24 August 1591 
Buried at Dean Prior, near Ashburton, Devonshire 15 October 1674. 

In this series "Professor Moorman's edition of 

The Poetical Works of Robert Herrick tvas 

first published in xgzi and reprinted in 19^, 

'947 > '95"^'^ '957 










POINTED IN GREAT BRITAIIf 
O.S.A. 



PREFACE 

The present reprint follows the authoritative text of the 
Hesperides which Herrick published in 1648. A larger 
edition, with an introduction discussing the text and 
a critical appendix, has already been issued by the 
Clarendon Press under the editorship of Professor 
Moorman. 

The printing and publishing of the 1648 edition raise 
some interesting problems. It appeared in octavo, with 
the poems in two sections — ^the Hesperides or secular 
pieces covering pages 1-398, with signatures A to C c 7, 
and the Noble Numbers ; or, his Pious Poems, with 
a separate title-page dated 1647, a new pagination, and 
a new set of signatures beginning again at A a and ending 
at E e 8. At first sight this suggests the separate, and 
therefore earlier, publication of the Noble Numbers. But 
the title-page beginning with a pronoun — His Noble 
Numbers — shows that these poems were intentionally 
placed last, and a valedictory couplet among the closing 
poems of the Hesperides (page 325) says explicitly — 

Part of the worke remaines ; one part is past : 
And here my ship rides having Anchor cast. 

The Works both Humane & Divine of Robert Herrick Esq. 
therefore appeared together, and probably they were 
printed simultaneously. The shorter section of the 
Noble Numbers must have been finished first in 1647, 
and the title-page printed off with that date in the 
expectation that the complete work would be issued 
before the end of the year, A problem of this kind caii 



vi Preface 

often be solved by consulting the Register of the 
Stationers' Company, on which books were entered for 
publication when the licensing fee was paid. But the 
only relevant entry is too early to be of any help : the 
following is found under the date ag April, 1640: 

Entred for his Copie vnder the hands 
Md ¥ * r* u °f Master Hansley and Master Bourne 
Master ^.rooke ^^^^^^ -j-he seuerall Poems written by 

Master Robert Herrick vj* 

(Arber, Transcript, \M. 509.) 

No edition of ,1640 is known, and presumably this entry 
covered the publication of the Hesperides eight years 
later. Herrick had employed the interval with unwearied 
patience and consumma,te art to reshape and refine his 
poems to their utmost perfection of form. Professor 
Moorman's larger edition gives an extensive collation of 
the extant manuscripts, showing that many of these were 
early drafts which the poet revised with minute care 
before he allowed the poems to be published. The 
scholar who wishes to study the development of Herrick's 
art must consult the record of these variants. 

Herrick's conscientious labour did not end with the 
revision of his tejdt in manuscript. He supervised the 
printing with equal Care. A collation of a number of 
copies has proved that he went personally to the printing 
office and corrected the work sheet by sheet as it issued 
from the press. The critical notes of the present edition 
record corrections made in the text after some early 
sheets had been printed off. Some corrections were 
made in the standing type; but when the error was 
riaore serious — as, for instance^ in Kissing Usurie (page 30), 
where the first and last half of the final stanza were 



Preface 



Vll 



transposed by the printer — the faulty leaves were can- 
celled and new ones were inserted. At least three leaves 
of the original issue were reset because of the printer's 
errors — those containing pages 39 and 30, 175 and 176, 
207 and ao8 ; in the Thomason copy in the British 
Museum one cancel is inserted the wrong way round. 
Some of the corrections have a literary value : thus, the 
lines on Dean-bourn, a rude River in Devon (page 39) 
begin — 

Dgan-boum, farewell ; I never look to see 

Deane, or thy warty incivility. 

Here the expressive epithet ' warty ' applied to the rough, 
bed of the stream, 

Thy rockie bottome, that doth teare thy streams 
And makes them frantick, ev'n to all extreames, 

was at first misprinted ' watry '. Occasionally the poet 
inserts a last touch of revision: in the pretty lines on 
Mistress Susanna Southwell's feet (page 193) — 

Her pretty feet 
Like snailes did creep 
A little out, and then, 
As if they started at Bo-peep, 
Did soon draw in agen — 

some copies preserve an original reading 'As if they 
played at Bo-peep ', which is not likely to have been an 
error of the printer. 

Finally, Herrick read over the sheets of the entire 
work after it had been printed off, made a list of errata 
which had escaped him in the hurry of reading at the 
printing office, and placed them before the text with the 
playful quatrain preserved on page 4. 



viii Preface 

The ordinary title-page of 1648 has been reproduced. 
But a few copies (e.g. the British Museum copy with 
press-mark E. 1090) give the interesting imprint : — 

L o N T) o :h^ 

Printed for John JVilliams, and Francis EglesfieU, 

and are to be fold by Tho: Hunt, Book-feller 

in Exon. 1548. 

Herrick's original publishers are to be commended for 
their enterprise in thus pushing the sale of his poems in 
the West Country. 

The present reprint differs in two points from the 
larger edition. First, it confines itself to the text of 
1648, noting only the variants of that issue. Secondly, 
as it has been prepared, not for the scholar, but for the 
lover of poetry, it omits almost entirely the ' Epigrams ' 
of the Hesperides. Herrick's conception of the epigram 
was derived, through Ben Jonson, from the antique ; but 
in actual practice he usually narrowed it down to the 
satiric type — a short poem, hitting off some ludicrous 
personal trait. It is one of the paradoxes of literature 
that this exquisite artist, experimenting in minute satire, 
should have composed a monotonous and, on the whole, 
pointless series of poems on merely nauseous themes. 
A reprint of Herrick among the Oxford Poets, side by 
side with the complete text already issued, gives a 
welcome opportunity of clearing away these weeds from 
the flower-garden of the Hesperides. 



Prefi 



'ace IX 

The library edition of Herrick (in the Oxford English 
Texts) was published in 1915, and the edition now 
issued would in the ordinary course have followed at 
no long interval. It has been delayed by the war, and 
in consequence of Professor Moorman's lamented death 
this preface has been supplied by another hand. 



CONTENTS. 

PAGB 

HESPERIDES I 

HIS NOBLE NUMBERS ^17 

ADDITIONAL POEMS j^ 

INDEX OF TITLES 407 

INDEX OF FIRST LINES .... 4*1 



HESTE 1^1 DE S: 

THE WORKS 

BOTH 

HUMANE & DIVINE 

O F 

Robert Herrick Efq. 

Ovid. 
Effugient avidos Carmina noftra Rogos. 




L O N D O 3^ 

Printed for John Williams, and Francis Eglesfield, 

and are to be fold at the Crown and Marygold 

in Saint Pauls Church-yard. 1648. 



TO THE MOST 

ILLVSTRIOVS, 

AND 

Most Hopeflill Prince, 
CHARLES, 

Prince of Wales. 

Well may my Book come forth like Publique Day 

When such a Light as You are leads the way : 

Who are my Works Creator, and alone 

The Matne of it, and the Expansion. 

And look how all those heavenly Lamps acquire 

Light from the Sun, that inexhausted Fire : 

So all my Morne, and Evening Stars from You 

Have their Existence, and their Influence too. 

Full is my Book of Glories ; but all These 

By You become Immortall Substances. 



For these Transgressions which thou here dost see, • 
Condemne the Printer, Reader, and not me ; 
Who gave him forth good Grain, though /le mistook 
The Seed ; so sovfd these Tares throughout my Book. 

[Note. — In the original text this address is followed by Errata, which have 
been duly corrected in this reprint.] 



HESPERIDES. 



'The Argument of his Book. 

I sing of Brooks, of Blossomes, Birds, and Bowers : 

Oi April, May, oi June, and _/»^-Flowers. 

I sing of May-poles, Hock-carts, Wassails, Wakes, 

Of Bride-grooms, Brides, and of their Bridall-cakes. 

I write of Youth, of Love, and have Accesse 

By these, to sing of cleanly- Wantonnesse. 

1 sing of Dewes, of Raines, and piece by piece 

Of Balme, of Oyle, of Spice, and Amber-Greece. 

I sing of Times trans-shifting ; and I write 

How Roses first came Red, and Lillies White. 

I write of Groves, of Twilights, and I sing 

The Court of Mab, and of the Fairie-King. 

I write of Hell; I sing (and ever shall) 

Of Heaven, and hope to have it after all. 



To his Muse. 

Whither, Mad maiden wilt thou roame ? 
Farre safer 'twere to stay at home : 
Where thou mayst sit, and piping please 
The poore and private Cottages. 
Since Coats, and Hamlets, best agree 
With this thy meaner Minstralsie. 
There with the Reed, thou mayst expresse 
The Shepherds Fleecie happinesse : 
And with thy Eclogues intermixe 
Some smooth, and harmlesse Beucolicks. 
There on a Hillock thou mayst sing 
Unto a handsome Shephardling ; 



Uesperides. 



Or to a Girle (that keeps the Neat) 

With breath more sweet then Violet. 

There, there, (perhaps) such Lines as These 15 

May take the simple Villages. 

But for the Court, the Country wit 

Is despicable unto it. 

Stay then at home, and doe not goe 

Or flie abroad to seeke for woe. ao 

Contempts in Courts and Cities dwell ; 

No Critick haunts the Poore mans Cell : 

Where thou mayst hear thine own Lines read 

By no one tongue, there, censured. 

That man's unwise will search for 111, a5 

And may prevent it, sitting still. 

To his Booke. 

While thou didst keep thy Candor undefil'd, 

Deerely I lov'd thee ; as my first-borne child : 

But when I saw thee wantonly to roame 

From house to house, and never stay at home ; 

I brake my bonds of Love, and bad thee goe, 5 

Regardlesse whether well thou sped'st, or no. 

On with thy fortunes then, what e're they be ; 

If good I'le smile, if bad I'le sigh for Thee. 



Another. 

To read my Booke the Virgin shie 
May blush, (while Brutus standeth by :) 
But when He's gone, read through what's writ, 
And never staine a cheeke for it. 



To the soure Reader. 

If thou dislik'st the Piece thou light'st on first ; 
Thinke that of All, that I have writ, the worst : 
But if thou read'st my Booke unto the end, 
And still do'st this, and that verse, reprehend ; 



Hesperides. 7 



O Perverse man ! If All disgustfull be, 

The Extreame Scabbe take thee, and thine, for me. 



To his Booke. 

Come thou not neere those men, who are like Bread 
O're-leven'd ; or like Cheese o're-renetted. 



When he would have his verses read. 

In sober mornings, doe not thou reherse 

The holy incantation of a verse ; 

But when that men have both well drunke, and fed, 

Let my Enchantments then be sung, or read. 

When Laurell spirts 'ith fire, and when the Hearth 5 

Smiles to it selfe, and guilds the roofe with mirth ; * P^ Javelin 

When up the * Thyrse is rais'd, and when the sound fj^^ ^"-^ 

Of sacred * Orgies flyes, A round, A round. *Yongs to 

When the Rose raignes, and locks with ointments shine, Bacchus. 

Let rigid Cato read these Lines of mine. 



Upon Julias Recovery. 

Droop, droop no more, or hang the head 

Ye Hoses almost withered ; 

Now strength, and newer Purple get, 

Each here declining Violet. 

O Primroses ! let this day be 

A Resurrection unto ye ; 

And to all flowers ally'd in blood, 

Or sworn to that sweet Sister-hood : 

For Health on Julia's cheek hath shed 

Clarret, and Creame commingled. 

And those her lips doe now appeare 

As beames of Corrall, but more cleare. 

Upon Julia. 3 Now] perhaps a misprint for N^w 



8 Hesperides. 



To Silvia to wed. 

Let us (though late) at last (my Silvia) wed ; 

And loving lie in one devoted bed. 

Thy Watch may stand, my minutes fly poste haste ; 

No sound calls back the yeere that once is past. 

Then sweetest Silvia, let's no longer stay ; 

True love, we know, precipitates delay. 

Away with doubts, all scruples hence remove ; 

No man at one time, can be wise, and love. 



The Parliament of Roses to Julia. 

I dreamt the Roses one time went 
To meet and sit in Parliament : 
The place for these, and for the rest 
Of flowers, was thy spotlesse breast : 
Over the which a State was drawne 
Of Tiffanie, or Cob-web Lawne ; 
Then in that Parly, all those powers 
Voted the Rose ; the Queen of flowers. 
But so, as that her self should be 
The maide of Honour unto thee. 



No bashfulnesse in begging. 

To get thine ends, lay bashfulnesse aside ; 
Whofeares to aske, doth teach to be deny'd. 



The Frozen Heart. 

I freeze, I freeze, and nothing dwels 
In me but Snow, and y sicks. 
For pitties sake give your advice. 
To melt this snow, and thaw this ice ; 
I'le drink down Flames, but if so be 
Nothing but love can supple me ; 
I'le rather keepe this frost, and snow, 
Then to be thaw'd, or heated so. 



Hesperides. 



To Perilla. 

Ah my Perilla ! do'st thou grieve to see 

Me, day by day, to steale away from thee ? 

Age cals me hence, and my gray haires bid come. 

And haste away to mine eternal home ; 

'Twill not be long {^Perilla) after this, 5 

That I must give thee the supremest kisse ; 

Dead when I am, first cast in salt, and bring 

Part of the cream e from that Reli^ous Spring; 

With which (Perilla) wash my hands and feet ; 

That done, then wind me in that very sheet lo 

Which wrapt thy smooth limbs (when thou didst implore 

The Gods protection, but the night before) 

Follow me weeping to my Turfe, and there 

Let fall a Primrose, and with it a teare : 

Then lastly, let some weekly-strewings be ij 

Devoted to the memory of me : 

Then shall my Ghost not walk about, but keep 

Still in the coole, and silent shades of sleep. 



A Song to the Maskers. 

Come down, and dance ye in the toyle 

Of pleasures, to a Heate ; 
But if to moisture, Let the oyle 

Of Roses be your sweat. 

Not only to your selves assume 
These sweets, but let them fly ; 

From this, to that, and so Perfume 
E'ne all the standers by. 

As Goddesse Isis (when she went, 
Or ghded through the street) 

Made all that touch't her with her scent. 
And whom she touch't, turne sweet. 



I o Hesperides. 



To Perenna. 

When I thy Parts runne o're, I can't espie 

In any one, the least indecencie : 

But every Line, and Limb diffused thence, 

A faire, and unfamiliar excellence : 

So, that the more I look, the more I prove, 

Ther's still more cause, why I the more should love. 

Treason. 

The seeds of Treason choake up as they spring, 
He Acts the Crime, that gives it Cherishing. 

Two Things Odious. 

Two of a thousand things, are disallow'd, 
A lying Rich man, and a Poore man proud. 

To his Mistresses. 

Helpe me ! helpe me ! now I call 

To my pretty Witchcrafts all : 

Old I am, and cannot do 

That, I was accustom'd to. 

Bring your Magicks, Spels, and Charmes, 

To enflesh my thighs, and armes : 

Is there no way to beget 

In my limbs their former heat ? 

yEson had (as Poets faine) 

Baths that made him young againe ; 

Find that Medicine (if you can) 

For your drie-decrepid man : 

Who would faine his strength renew. 

Were it but to pleasure you. 

The Wounded Heart. 

Come bring your sampler, and with Art, 

Draw in't a wounded Heart : 

And dropping here, and there : 
Not that I thinke, that any Dart, 



Hesperides. 1 1 



Can make your's bleed a teare : 
Or peirce it any where ; 
Yet doe it to this end : that I, 
May by 
This secret see, 
Though you can make 
That Heart to bleed, your's ne'r will ake 
For me. 



No Loathsomnesse in love. 

What I fancy, I approve, 

No Dislike there is in love : 

Be my Mistresse short or tall, 

And distorted there-wrthall : 

Be she likewise one of those. 

That an Acre hath of Nose : 

Be her forehead, and her eyes 

Full of incongruities : 

Be her cheeks so shallow too, 

As to shew her Tongue wag through : 

Be her lips ill hung, or set. 

And her grinders black as jet ; 

Ha's she thinne haire, hath she none, 

She's to me a Paragon. 



To Anthea. 

If deare Anthea, my hard fate it be 
To live some few-sad-howers after thee : 
Thy sacred Corse with Odours I will burne ; 
And with my Lawrell crown thy Golden Urnc. 
Then holding up (there) such religious Things, 
As were (time past) thy holy Filitings : 
Nere to thy Reverend Pitcher I will fall 
Down dead for grief, and end my woes withall : 
So three in one small plat of ground shall ly, 
Anthea, Herrick, and his Foetry. 



1 2 Hesperides. 

The Weeping Cherry. 

I saw a Cherry weep, and why ? 

Why wept it ? but for shame, 
Because ray Julia's lip was by, 

And did out-red the same. 
But pretty Fondling, let not fall 

A teare at all for that : 
Which Rubies, Corralls, Scarlets, all 

For tincture, wonder at. 



Soft Mustek. 

The mellow touch of musick most doth wound 
The soule, when it doth rather sigh, then sound. 



The Difference Betwixt Kings and Subjects. 

Twixt Kings and Subjects ther's this mighty odds. 
Subjects are taught by Men ; Kings by the Gods. 



His Answer to a Question. 

Some would know 

Why I so 
Long still doe tarry, 

And ask why 

Here that I 
Live, and not marry ? 

Thus I those 

Doe oppose ; 
What man would be here, 

Slave to Thrall, 

If at all 
He could live free here ? 



Hespertdes. 1 3 

Upon Julia's Fall. 

Julia was carelesse, and withall, 

She rather took, then got a fall : 

The wanton Ambler chanc'd to see 

Part of her leggs sinceritie : 

And ravish'd thus, It came to passe, f 

The Nagge (like to the Prophets Asse) 

Began to speak, and would have been 

A telling what rare sights h'ad seen : 

And had told all ; but did refraine, 

Because his Tongue was ty'd againe. lo 

Expences Exhaust. 

Live with a thrifty, not a needy Fate ; 
Small shots paid often, waste a vast estate. 



Love what it is. 

Love is a circle that doth restlesse move 
In the same sweet eternity of love. 

Presence and Absence. 

When what is lov'd, is Present, love doth spring ; 
But being absent. Love lies languishing. 



No Spouse but a Sister. 

A bachelour I will 
Live as I have liv'd still, 
And never take a wife 
To crucifie my life : 
But this I'le tell ye too, 
What now I meane to doe ; 
A Sister (in the stead 
Of Wife) about I'le lead ; 
Which I will keep embrac'd, 
And kisse, but yet be chaste. 



14 Hesperides. 

ne Pomander Bracekt. 

To me ray Julia lately sent 

A Bracelet richly Redolent : 

The Beads I kist, but most lov'd her 

That did perfume the Pomander. 



The shooe tying. 

Anthea bade me tye her shooe ; 
I did ; and kist the Instep too : 
And would have kist unto her knee, 
Had not her Blush rebuked me. 



The Carkanet. 

Instead of Orient Pearls of Jet, 
I sent my Love a Karkanet : 
About her spotlesse neck she knit 
The lace, to honour me, or it : 
Then think how wrapt was I to see 
My Jet t'enthrall such Ivorie. 



His sailing from Julia. 

When that day comes, whose evening sayes I'm gone 

Unto that watrie Desolation : 

Devoutly to thy C/osei-gods then pray, 

That my wing'd ship may meet no Remora. 

Those Deities which circum-walk the Seas, 

And look upon our dreadfuU passages, 

Will from all dangers, re-deliver me. 

For one drink-offering, poured out by thee. 

Mercie and Truth live with thee ! and forbeare 

(In my short absence) to unsluce a teare : 

But yet for Loves-sake, let thy lips doe this. 

Give my dead picture one engendring kisse : 

Work that to life, and let me ever dwell 

In thy remembrance {Julia.) So farewell. 



Hesperides. 1 5 



How the Wall-flower came first, and 
why so called. 

Why this Flower is now call'd so, 

List' sweet maids, and you shal know. 

Understand, this First-ling was 

Once a brisk and bonny Lasse, 

Kept as close as Danae was : 5 

Who a sprightly Springall lov'd. 

And to have it fully prov'd, 

Up she got upon a wall, 

Tempting down to slide withall : 

But the silken twist unty'd, lo 

So she fell, and bruis'd, she dy'd. 

Love, in pity of the deed, 

And her loving-lucklesse speed, 

Tum'd her to this Plant, we call 

Now, The Flomer of the Wall. 15 



Why Flowers change colour. 

These fresh beauties (we can prove) 
Once were Virgins sick of love, 
Turn'd to Flowers. Still in some 
Colours goe, and colours come. 



To his Mistresse objecting to him neither 
"Toying or Talking. 

You say I love not, 'cause I doe not play 
Still with your curies, and kisse the time away. 
You' blame me too, because I cann't devise 
Some sport, to please those Babies in your eyes • 
By Loves Religion, I must here confesse it, 
The most I love, when I the least expresse it 



1 6 Hesperides. 



Small grief s find tongues : Full Casques are ever found 

To give (if any, yet) but little sound. 

Deep waters noyse-lesse are ; And this we know, 

That chiding streams betray small depth below. 

So when Love speechlesse is, she doth expresse 

A depth in love, and that depth, bottomlesse. 

Now since my love is tongue-lesse, know me such, 

Who speak but little, 'cause I love so much. 



Upon the losse of his Mistresses. 

I have lost, and lately, these 

Many dainty Mistresses : 

Stately ^a//a, prime of all j 

Sapho next, a principall : 

Smooth Anthea, for a skin 

White, and Heaven-like Chrystalline : 

Sweet Electra, and the choice 

Myrha, for the Lute, and Voice. 

Next, Corinna, for her wit, 

And for the graceful use of it : 

With Perilla : All are gone ; 

Onely HerricKs left alone, 

For to number sorrow by 

Their departures hence, and die. 



The 'Dream. 

Me thought, (last night) love in an anger came. 
And brought a rod, so whipt me with the same : 
Mirtle the twigs were, meerly to imply ; 
Love strikes, but 'tis with gentle crueltie. 
Patient I was : Love pitifull grew then, 
And stroak'd the stripes, and I was whole agen. 
Thus like a Bee, Love-gentle stil doth bring 
Hony to salve, where he before did sting. 



Mesperides. 1 7 



To hove. 

I'm free from thee ; and thou no more shalt heare 
My puling Pipe to beat against thine eare: 
Farewell my shackles, (though of pearle they be) 
Such precious thraldome ne'r shall fetter me. 
He loves his bonds, who when the first are broke, 
Submits his neck unto a second yoke. 



On himselfe. 

Young I was, but now am old, 
But I am not yet grown cold ; 
I can play, and I can twine 
'Bout a Virgin like a Vine : 
In her lap too I can lye 
Melting, and in fancie die : 
And return to life, if she 
Claps my cheek, or kisseth me ; 
Thus, and thus it now appears 
That our love out-lasts our yeeres. 



Love s play at Push-pin. 

Love and my selfe (beleeve me) on a day 
At childish Push-pin (for our sport) did play : 
I put, he pusht, and heedless of my skin. 
Love prickt my finger with a golden pin : 
Since which, it festers so, that I can prove 
'Twas but a trick to poyson me with love : 
Little the wound was ; greater was the smart , 
The finger bled, but burnt was all my heart. 



The Rosarie. 

One ask'd me where the Roses grew ? 

I bade him not goe seek ; 
But forthwith bade my Julia shew 

A bud in either cheek. 



1 8 Hesperides. 

Upon Cupid. 

Old wives have often told, how they 
Saw Cupid bitten by a flea : 
And thereupon, in tears half drown'd, 
He cry'd aloud, Help, help the wound : 
He wept, he sobb'd, he call'd to some 
To bring him Lint, and Balsamum, 
To make a Tent, and put it in, 
Where the Steletto pierc'd the skin : 
Which being done, the fretful! paine 
Asswag'd, and he was well again. 

The Parcae, or, Three dainty Destinies. 
The Armilet. 

Three lovely Sisters working were 

(As they were closely set) 
Of soft and dainty Maiden-haire, 

A curious Armekt. 
I smiling, ask'd them what they did ? 

(Faire Destinies all three) 
Who told me, they had drawn a thred 

of Life, and 'twas for me. 
They shew'd me then, how fine 'twas spun ; 

And I reply'd thereto, 
I care not now how soone 'tis done. 

Or cut, if cut by you. 

Sorrowes succeed. 

When one is past, another care we have. 
Thus woe succeeds a woe ; as wave a wave. 

Cherry-pit. 

Julia and I did lately sit 
Playing for sport, at Cherry-pit : 
She threw ; I cast ; and having thrown, 
I got the Pit, and she the Stone. 



Hesperides. 1 9 



To Robin Red-brest. 

Laid out for dead, let thy last kindnesse be 
With leaves and mosse-work for to cover me : 
And while the Wood-nimphs my cold corps inter, 
Sing thou my Dirge, sweet-warbling Chorister ! 
For Epitaph, in Foliage, next write this, 
Here, here the Tomb of Robin Herrick is. 



Discontents in Devon. 

More discontents I never had 

Since I was born, then here ; 
Where I have been, and still am sad. 

In this dull Devon-shire : 
Yet justly too I must confesse ; 

I ne'r invented such 
Ennobled numbers for the Presse, 

Then where I loath'd so much. 



2o his Patemall Countrey. 

O Earth ! Earth ! Earth heare thou my voice, and be 
Loving, and gentle for to cover me : 
Banish'd from thee I live ; ne'r to return, 
Unlesse thou giv'st my small Remains an Ume. 



Cherrie-ripe. 

Cherrie-Ripe, Ripe, Ripe, I cry, 
Full and faire ones ; come and buy : 
If so be, you ask me where 
They doe grow ? I answer. There, 
Where my Julia's lips doe smile ; 
There's the Land, or Cherry-Ile : 
Whose Plantations fully show 
All the yeere, where Cherries grow. 



20 Hesperides. 



'To his Mistresses. 

Put on your silks ; and piece by piece 
Give them the scent of Amber-Greece : 
And for your breaths too, let them smell 
AmbrosiaJike, or Nectarell : 
While other Gums their sweets perspire, 
By your owne jewels set on fire. 



To Anthea. 

Now is the time, when all the lights wax dim ; 

And thou {Anthea) must withdraw from him 

Who was thy servant. Dearest, bury me 

Under that Holy^ttke, or Gospel-tree : 

Where (though thou see'st not) thou may'st think upon 

Me, when thou yeerly go'st Procession : 

Or for mine honour, lay me in that Tombe 

In which thy sacred Reliques shall have roome : 

For my Embalming (Sweetest) there will be 

No Spices wanting, when I'm laid by thee. 



The Vision to Electra. 

I dream'd we both were in a bed 

Of Roses, almost smothered : 

The warmth and sweetnes had me there 

Made lovingly familiar : 

But that I heard thy sweet breath say. 

Faults done by night, will blush by day : 

I kist thee (panting,) and I call 

Night to the Record ! that was all. 

But ah ! if empty dreames so please. 

Love give me more such nights as these. 



Dreames. 

Here we are all, by day ; By night w'are hurl'd 
By dreames, each one, into a sev'rall world. 



Hesperides, 21 



Ambition. 

In Man, Ambition is the common'st thing; 
Each one, by nature, loves to be a King. 



His request to Julia. 

Julia, if I chance to die 

Ere I print my Poetry ; 

I most humbly thee desire 

To commit it to the fire : 

Better 'twere my Book were dead, 

Then to live not perfected. 



Money gets the masterie. 

Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'rcome, 
When no force else can get the masterdome. 



The Scar-fire. 

Water, water I desire. 
Here's a house of flesh on fire : 
Ope' the fountains and the springs, 
And come all to Buckittings : 
What ye cannot quench, pull downe ; 
Spoile a house, to save atowne : 
Better tis that one shu'd fall. 
Then by one, to hazard all. 



Upon Silvia, a Mistresse. 

When some shall say, Faire once my Silvia was ; 
Thou wilt complaine, False now's thy Looking-glasse ; 
Which renders that quite tarnisht, w''ii was green ; 
And Priceless now, what Peerless once had been : 
Upon thy Forme more wrinkles yet will fall. 
An J comming downe, shall make no noise at all. 



2 2 Hesperides. 

Cheeffulnesse in Charitie : or^ T/ie sweet sacrifice. 

'Tis not a thousand Bullocks thies 
Can please those Heav'nly Deities, 
If the Vower don't express 
In his Offering, Cheerfulness. 



Once poore, still penurious. 

Goes the world now, it will with thee goe hard : 
The fattest Hogs we grease the more with Lard. 

To him that has, there shall be added more ; 

Who is penurious, he shall still be poore. 



Sweetnesse in Sacrifice. 

'Tis not greatness they require, 
To be offer'd up by fire : 
But 'tis sweetness that doth please 
TTiose Eternall Essences. 



Steame in Sacrifice. 

If meat the Gods give, I the steame 
High-towring wil devote to them : 
Whose easie natures like it well. 
If we the roste have, they the smell. 



Upon Julia's Voice. 

So smooth, so sweet, so silv'ry is thy voice. 
As, could they hear, the Damn'd would make no noise, 
But listen to thee, (walking in thy chamber) 
Melting melodious words, to Lutes of Amber. 



Hesperides. 2.3 

Againe. 

When I thy singing next shall heare, 

lie wish I might turne all to eare, 

To drink in Notes, and Numbers ; such 

As blessed soules cann't heare too much : 

Then melted down, there let me lye 5 

Entranc'd, and lost confusedly : 

And by thy Musique strucken mute, 

Die, and be turn'd into a Lute. 



All things decay and die. 

All things decay with Time : The Forrest sees 
The growth, and down-fall of her aged trees : 
That Timber tall, which three-score lusters stood 
The proud Dictator of the State-like wood : 
I meane (the Soveraigne of all Plants) the Oke 
Droops, dies, and falls without the cleavers stroke. 



The succession of the four e sweet months. 

First, April, she with mellow showrs 
Opens the way for early flowers ; 
Then after her comes smilin;,' May 
In a more rich and sweet aray : 
Next enters June, and brings us more 
Jems, then those two, that went before : 
Then {[astly) July comes, and she 
More wealth brings in, then all those three. 



No Shipwrack of Vertue. To a friend. 

Thou sail'st with others, in this Argus here ; 

Nor wrack, or Bulging thou hast cause to feare : 

But trust to this, my noble passenger ; 

Who swims with Vertue, he shall still be sure 

( 6'5'WM-like) all tempests to endure ; 

And 'midst a thousand gulfs to be secure. 



24 Hesperides. 



Upon his Sister-in-Law, Mistresse 
Elizab: Herrick. 

First, for Effusions due unto the dead, 
My solemne Vowes have here accomplished : 
Next, how I love thee, that my griefe must tell. 
Wherein thou liv'st for ever. Deare farewell. 



Of Love. A Sonet. 

How Love came in, I do not know, 
Whether by th' eye, or eare, or no : 
Or whether with the soule it came 
(At first) infused with the same : 
Whether in part 'tis here or there. 
Or, like the soule, whole every where : 
This troubles me : but I as well 
As any other, this can tell ; 
That when from hence she does depart, 
The out-let then is from the heart. 



To Anthea. 

Ah my Anthea ! Must my heart still break ? 

{Love makes me.ivrite, what shame forbids to speak.) 

Give me a kisse, and to that kisse a score ; 

Then to that twenty, adde an hundred more : 

A thousand to that hundred : so kisse on, 

To make that thousand up a million. 

Treble that million, and when that is done. 

Let's kisse afresh, as when we first begun. 

But yet, though Love likes well such Scenes as these, 

There is an Act that will more fully please : 

Kissing and glancing, soothing, all make way 

But to the acting of this private Play : 

Name it I would ; but being blushing red. 

The rest He speak, when we meet both in bed. 



Hesperides. 2:5 

The Rock of Rubies : and 
The quarrie- of Pearls. 

Some ask'd me where the Rubies grew ? 

And nothing I did say : 
But with my finger pointed to 

The lips oi Julia. 
Some ask'd how Pearls did grow, and where ? 5 

Then spoke I to my Girle, 
To part her lips, and shew'd them there 

The Quarelets of Pearl. 



Conformitie. 

Conformity was ever knowne 

A foe to Dissolution : 

Nor can we that a ruine call, 

Whose crack gives crushing unto all. 



TO THE KING 

Upon his comming with his 
Army into the West. 

Welcome, most welcome to our Vowes and us. 
Most great, and universall Genius \ 
The Drooping West, which hitherto has stood 
As one, in long-lamented-widow-hood ; 
Looks like a Bride now, or a bed of flowers, 
Newly refresh't, both by the Sun, and showers. 
War, which before was horrid, now appears 
Lovely in you, brave Prince of Cavaliers ! 
A deale of courage in each bosome springs 
By your accesse ; {O you the best of Kings /) 
Ride on with all white Omens ; so, that where 
Your Standard's up, we fix a Conquest there. 



2 6 Hesperides. 



Upon Roses. 

Under a Lawne, then skyes more cleare, 

Some ruffled Roses nestling were : 

And snugging there, they seem'd to lye 

As in a flowrie Nunnery : 

They blush'd, and look'd more fresh then flowers 

Quickned of late by Pearly showers j 

And all, because they were possest 

But of the heat o[ Julia's breast : 

Which as a warme, and moistned spring. 

Gave them their ever flourishing. 

To the King and Queene, upon 

their unhappy distances. 

Woe, woe to them, who (by a ball of strife) 

Doe, and have parted here a Man and Wife :, 

Charls the best Husband, while Maria strives 

To be, and is, the very best of Wives : 

Like Streams, you are divorc'd ; but 't will come, when 

These eyes of mine shall see you mix agen. 

Thus speaks the Oke, here ; C. and M. shall meet, 

Treading on Amber, with their silver-feet : 

Nor wil't be long, ere this accomplish'd be ; 

The words found true, C. M. remember me. 



Dangers wait on Kings. 

As oft as Night is banish'd by the Morne, 
So oft, we'll think, we see a King new born. 



The Cheat of Cupid : or. 
The ungentle guest. 

One silent night of late, 

When every creature rested. 

Came one unto my gate. 
And knocking, me molested. 



Hesperides. 2 7 

Who's that (said I) beats there, 5 

And troubles thus the Sleepie ? 
Cast off (said he) all feare, 

And let not Locks thus keep ye. 



For I a Boy am, who 

By Moonlesse nights have swerved ; lo 

And all with showrs wet through, 

And e'en with cold half starved. 

I pittifuU arose, 

And soon a Taper lighted ; 
And did my selfe disclose 15 

Unto the lad benighted. 

I saw he had a Bow, 

And Wings too, which did shiver ; 
And looking down below, 

I spy'd he had a Quiver. 20 

I to my Chimney's shine 

Brought him, (as Love professes) 
And chafd his hands with mine, 

And dry'd his dropping Tresses : 

But when he felt him warm'd, 25 

Let's try this bow of ours. 
And string if they be harm'd. 

Said he, with these late showrs. 

Forthwith his bow he bent. 

And wedded string and arrow, 30 

And struck me that it went 

Quite through my heart and marrow. 

Then laughing loud, he flew 

Away, and thus said flying, 
Adieu, mine Host, Adieu, 35 

He leave thy heart a dying. 



2 8 Hesperides. 

To the reverend shade of his religious Father. 

That for seven Lusters I did never come 

To doe the Rites to thy Religious Tombe : 

That neither haire was cut, or true teares shed 

By me, o'r thee, (as justments to the dead) 

Forgive, forgive me ; since I did not know 5 

Whether thy bones had here their Rest, or no. 

But now 'tis known, Behold ; behold, I bring 

Unto thy Ghost, th' Effused Offering : 

And look, what Smallage, Night-shade, Cypresse, Yew, 

Unto the shades have been, or now are due, lo 

Here I devote ; And something more then so ; 

I come to pay a Debt of Birth I owe. 

Thou gav'st me life, (but Mortall ;) For that one 

Favour, He make full satisfaction ; 

For my life mortall, Rise from out thy Herse, 15 

And take a life immortall from my Verse. 

'Delight in Disorder. 

A sweet disorder in the dresse 

Kindles in cloathes a wantonnesse : 

A Lawne about the shoulders thrown 

Into a fine distraction : 

An erring Lace, which here and there 5 

Enthralls the Crimson Stomacher : 

A Cuffe neglectful!, and thereby 

Ribbands to flow confusedly : 

A winning wave (deserving Note) 

In the tempestuous petticote : 10 

A carelesse shooe- string, in whose tye 

I see a wilde civility : 

Doe more bewitch me, then when Art 

Is too precise in every part. 

To his Muse. 

Were I to give thee Baptime, I wo'd chuse 
To Christen thee, the Bride, the Bashfull Muse, 
Or Muse of Roses : since that name does fit 
Best with those Virgin- Verses thou hast writ : 



Hesperides. 29 



Which are so cleane, so chast, as none may feare 
Cato the Censor, sho'd he scan each here. 



Upon Love. 

Love scorch'd my finger, but did spare 

The burning of my heart : 
To signifie, in Love my share 

Sho'd be a little part. 

Little I love ; but if that he 

Wo'd but that heat recall : 
That joynt to ashes sho'd be burnt, 

Ere I wo'd love at all. 



Dean-bourn, a rude River in Devon, 
by which sometimes he lived. 

Dean-bourn, farewell ; I never look to see 

Deane, or thy warty incivility. 

Thy rockie bottome, that doth teare thy streams 

And makes them frantick, ev'n to all extreames ; 

To my content, I never sho'd behold, 5 

Were thy streames silver, or thy rocks all gold. 

Rockie thou art ; and rockie we discover 

Thy men ; and rockie are thy wayes all over. 

O men, O manners ; Now, and ever knowne 

To be A Rockie Generation I lo 

A people currish; churlish as the seas; 

And'rude (almost) as rudest Salvages. 

With whom I did, and may re-sojourne when 

Rockes turn to Rivers, Rivers turn to Men. 

Upon Lffve. 7 sho'd be burnt] The rhyme seems to require burnt sho'd be, 
and this is the order of the words in the Witts Recreations (1654) reprint. 
In certain copies 0/1648 be is misprinted he 

Title. Desin-boum] To Dean-bourn some copies 0/1648 
2 warty] watry some copies of 1648, and so Grosart, Hazlitt, Pollard, (s'c. 
9 Now] There some copies 0/1648 



30 Hespertdes. 

Kissing Usurie. 

Biancha, Let 

Me pay the debt 
I owe thee for a kisse 

Thou lend'st to me ; 

And I to thee 5 

Will render ten for this : 

If thou wilt say, 

Ten will not pay 
For that so rich a one ; 

He cleare the summe, lo 

If it will come 
Unto a Million. 

By this I guesse, 

Of happinesse 
Who has a little measure : 15 

He must of right, 

To th'utmost mite, 
Make payment for his pleasure. 

To Julia. 

How rich and pleasing thou ray /tilia art 
In each thy dainty, and peculiar part ! 
First, for thy Queen-ship on thy head is set 
Of flowers a sweet commingled Coronet : 
About thy neck a Carkanet is bound, 5 

Made of the Ruble, Pearle and Diamond : 
A golden ring, that shines upon thy thumb : 
About thy wrist, the rich * Dardanium. * ^ Bracelet, 

Between thy Breasts (then Doune of Swans -'''■'"" ^'"'^: 
more white) «ussocalCd. 

There playes the Saphire with the Chrysolite. 10 

No part besides must of thy selfe be known. 
But by the Topaz, Opal, Calcedon. 

Kissing Usurie. 13-18 In certain copies 0/1648, andin Grosarl, II. 16-18 
precede II. 13-15: no doubt wrongly 

Tojuiia. g 'Breasts} misprinted Brenst in some copies 0/ 1648 



Hesperides. 3 1 



To Laurels. 

A funerall stone, 
Or Verse I covet none • 
But onely crave 
Of you, that I may have 
A sacred Laurel springing from my grave 
Which being seen, 
Blest with perpetuall greene. 

May grow to be 
Not so much call'd a tree, 
As the eternall monument of me. 



His Cavalier. 

Give me that man, that dares bestride 
The active Sea-horse, & with pride, 
Through that huge field of waters ride : 
AVho, with his looks too,, can appease 
The ruffling winds and raging Seas, 
In mid'st of all their outrages. 
This, this a virtuous man can doe, 
Saile against Rocks, and split them too : 
I ! and a world of Pikes passe through. 



Zeal required in Love. 

I'le doe my best to win, when'ere I wooe : 
That man loves not, who is not zealous too. 



The Bag of the Bee. 

About the sweet bag of a Bee, 

Two Cupids fell at odds ; 
And whose the pretty prize shu'd be. 

They vow'd to ask the Gods. 

The Bag of the Bee. 2 odds] misprinted i&o% in some copies of 164S 



3^ Hesperides. 

Which Venus hearing ; thither came, 5 

And for their boldness stript them : 
And taking thence from each his flame ; 

With rods of Mirtle whipt them. 

Which done, to still their wanton cries. 

When quiet grown sh'ad seen them, lo 

She kist, and wip'd thir dove-like eyes ; 

And gave the Bag between them. 

Lave kiWd by Lack, 

Let me be warme ; let me be fully fed ; 
Luxurious Love by Wealth is nourished. 
Let me be leane, and cold, and once grown poore, 
I shall dislike, what once I lov'd before. 

To his Mistresse. 

Choose me your Valentine ; 

Next, let us marry : 
Love to the death will pine, 

If we long tarry. 

Promise, and keep your vowes, f 

Or vow ye never : 
Loves doctrine disallowes 

Troth-breakers ever. 

You have broke promise twice 

(Deare) to undoe me ; lo 

If you prove faithlesse thrice. 

None then will wooe you. 

To the generous Reader. 

See, and not see; and if thou chance t'espie 

Some Aberrations in my Poetry ; 

Wink at small faults, the greater, ne'rthelesse 

Hide, and with them, their Fathers nakedness. 

Let's doe our best, our Watch and Ward to keep : 5 

Homer himself, in a long work, may sleep. 

Xohis Mistresse. 12 yon] the rhyme indicates that^«« shouM'be;ye 



Hesperides. 3 3 



To Criticks. 

He write, because He give 
You Criticks means to live : 
For sho'd I not supply 
The Cause, th'effect we'd die. 



Duty to 'Tyrants. 

Good princes must be pray'd for : for the bad 
They must be borne with, and in rev'rence had. 
Doe they first pill thee, next, pluck off thy skin ? 
Good children Msse the Rods, that punish sin. 
Touch not the Tyrant ; Let the Gods alone 
To strike him dead, that but usurps a Throne. 



Being once blind, his request to Biancha. 

When age or Chance has made me blind. 

So that the path I cannot find : 

And when my falls and stumblings are 

More then the stones i'th' street by farre : 

Goe thou afore ; and I shall well 

Follow thy Perfumes by the smell : 

Or be my guide ; and I shall be 

Led by some light that flows from thee. 

Thus held, or led by thee, I shall 

In wayes confus'd, nor slip or fall. 



No want where there s little. 

To Bread and Water none is poore ; 
And having these, what need of more ? 
Though much from out the Cess be spent. 
Nature with little is content. 

Duty, to Tyrants. 4 Kods\ rod 164S : corr. in orig. Errata 

HERRICK P 



34 Hesperides. 

Barly-Break : or, Last in Hell. 

We two are last in Hell : what may we feare 
To be tormented, or kept Pris'ners here ? 
Alas ! If kissing te of plagues the worst, 
We'll wish, in Hell we had been Last and First, 

'The Definition of Beauty. 

Beauty, no other thing is, then a Beame 
Flasht out between the Middle and Extreame. 



To Dianeme. 

Deare, though to part it be a Hell, 

Yet Dianeme now farewell : 

Thy frown (last night) did bid me goe ; 

But whither, onely Grief do's know. 

I doe beseech thee, ere we part, 5 

(If mercifuU, as faire thou art ; 

Or else desir'st that Maids sho'd tell 

Thy pitty by Loves-Chronicle) 

O Dianeme, rather kill 

Me, then to make me languish stil ! lo 

'Tis cruelty in thee to'th'height. 

Thus, thus to wound, not kill out-right : 

Yet there's a way found (if thou please) 

By sudden death to give me ease : 

And thus devis'd, doe thou but this, 15 

Bequeath to me one parting kisse : 

So sup'rabundant joy shall be 

The Executioner of me. 



To Anthea lying in bed. 

So looks Anthea, when in bed she lyes, 
Orecome, or halfe betray'd by Tiffanies : 
Like to a Twi-light, or that simpring Dawn, 
That Roses shew, when misted o're with Lawn. 
Twilight is yet, till that her Lawnes give way ; 
Which done, that Dawne, turnes then to perfect day. 



Hesperides. 3 5 

To Electra. 



More white then whitest Lillies far, 
Or Snow, or whitest Swans you are : 
More white then are the whitest Creames, 
Or Moone-hght tinselling the streames : 
More white then Fear Is, or Juno's thigh; 
Or Pelops Arme of Yvorie. 
True, I confesse ; such Whites as these 
May me delight, not fully please : 
Till, like Ixion's Cloud you be 
White, warnie, and soft to lye with me. 



A Country life: To his Brother, 
M. Tho: Herrick. 

Thrice, and above, blest (my soules halfe) art thou. 

In thy both Last, and Better Vow : 
Could'st leave the City, for exchange, to see 

The Countries sweet simplicity : 
And it to know, and practice ; with intent 5 

To grow the sooner innocent : 
By studying to know vertue ; and to aime 

More at her nature, then her name : 
The last is but the least ; the first doth tell 

Wayes lesse to live, then to live well : lo 

And both are knowne to thee, who now can'st live 

Led by thy conscience ; to give 
Justice to soone-pleas'd nature ; and to show, 

Wisdome and she together goe, 
And keep one Centre : This with that conspires, 15 

To teach Man to confine desires : 
And know, that Riches have their proper stint. 

In the contented mind, not mint. 
And can'st instruct, that those who have the itch 

Of craving more, are never rich. ao 

These things thou know'st to'th'height, and dost prevent 

That plague ; because thou art content 
With that Heav'n gave thee with a warie hand, 

(More blessed in thy Brasse, then Land) 



3 6 Hesperides. 



To keep cheap Nature even, and upright ; »S 

To coole, not cocker Appetite. 
Thus thou can'st tearcely live to satisfie 

The belly chiefly ; not the eye : 
Keeping the barking stomach wisely quiet, 

Lesse with a neat, then needfuU diet. 3° 

But that which most makes sweet thy country life, 

Is, the fruition of a wife : 
Whom (Stars consenting with thy Fate) thou hast 

Got, not so beautifuU, as chast : 
By whose warme side thou dost securely sleep 35 

(While Love the Centinell doth keep) 
With those deeds done by day, which n'er affright 

Thy silken slumbers in the night. 
Nor has the darknesse power to usher in 

Feare to those sheets, that know no sin. 40 

But still thy wife, by chast intentions led. 

Gives thee each night a Maidenhead. 
The Damaskt medowes, and the peebly streames 

Sweeten, and make soft your dreames : 
The Purling springs, groves, birds, and well-weav'd Bowrs, 

With fields enameled with flowers, 46 

Present their shapes ; while fantasie discloses 

Millions of Lillies mixt with Roses. 
Then dream, ye heare the Lamb by many a bleat 

Woo'd to come suck the milkie Teat : 50 

While Faunus in the Vision comes to keep, 

From rav'ning wolves, the fleecie sheep. 
With thousand such enchanting dreams, that meet 

To make sleep not so sound, as sweet : 
Nor can these figures so thy rest endeare, 55 

As not to rise when Chanticlere 
Warnes the last Watch ; but with the Dawne dost rise 

To work, but first to sacrifice ; 
Making thy peace with heav'n, for some late fault, 

With Holy-meale, and spirting-salt. 60 

Which done, thy painfull Thumb this sentence tells us, 

Jove for our labour all things sells us. 
Nor are thy daily and devout affaires 

Attended with those desp'rate cares, 
Th' industrious Merchant has ; who for to find 65 

Gold, runneth to the Western Inde, 



Hesperides. 3 7 

And back again, (tortur'd with fears) doth fly, 

Untaught, to suffer Poverty. 
But thou at home, blest with securest ease, 

Sitt'st, and beleev'st that there be seas, 70 

And watrie dangers ; while thy whiter hap. 

But sees these things within thy Map. 
And viewing them with a more safe survey, 

Mak'st easie Feare unto thee say, 
A heart thrice walPd with Oke, and Brasse, that man 75 

Had, first, durst plow the Ocean. 
But thou at home without or tyde or gale. 

Canst in thy Map securely saile : 
Seeing those painted Countries ; and so guesse 

By those fine Shades, their Substances : 80 

And from thy Compasse taking small advice, 

Buy'st Travell at the lowest price. 
Nor are thine eares so deafe, but thou canst heare 

(Far more with wonder, then with feare) 
Fame tell of States, of Countries, Courts, and Kings ; 85 

And beleeve there be such things : 
When of these truths, thy happyer knowledge lyes. 

More in thine eares, then in thine eyes. 
And when thou hear'st by that too-true-Report, 

Vice rules the Most, or All at Court : 90 

Thy pious wishes are, (though thou not there) 

Vertue had, and mov'd her Sphere. 
But thou liv'st fearlesse ; and thy face ne'r shewes 

Fortune when she comes, or goes. 
But with thy equall thoughts, prepar'd dost stand, 95 

To take her by the either hand : 
Nor car'st which comes the first, the foule or faire ; 

A wise man ev'ry way lies square. 
And like a surly Oke with storms perplext ; 

Growes still the stronger, strongly vext. 100 

Be so, bold spirit ; Stand Center-like, unmov'd ; 

And be not onely thought, but prov'd 
To be what I report thee ; and inure 

Thy selfe, if want comes to endure : 
And so thou dost : for thy desires are 105 

Confin'd to live with private Larr : 
Not curious whether Appetite be fed. 

Or with the first, or second bread. 



3 8 Hesperides. 



Who keep'st no proud mouth for delicious cates : 

Hunger makes coorse meats, delicates. iro 

Can'st, and unurg'd, forsake that Larded fare, 

Which Art, not Nature, makes so rare ; 
To taste boyl'd Nettles, Colworts, Beets, and eate 

These, and sowre herbs, as dainty meat ? 
While soft Opinion makes thy Genius say, 115 

Content makes all Ambrosia. 
Nor is it, that thou keep'st this stricter size 

So much for want, as exercise ; 
To numb the sence of Dearth, which sho'd sinne haste it, 

Thou might'st but onely see't, not taste it. uo 

Yet can thy humble roofe maintaine a Quire 

Of singing Crickits by thy fire : 
And the brisk Mouse may feast her selfe with crums, 

Till that the green-ey'd Kitling comes. 
Then to her Cabbin, blest she can escape laj 

The sudden danger of a Rape. 
And thus thy little-well-kept-stock doth prove. 

Wealth cannot make a life, but Love. 
Nor art thou so close-handed, but can'st spend 

(Counsell concurring with the end) 130 

As well as spare : still conning o'r this Theame, 

To shun the first, and last extreame 
Ordaining that thy small stock find no breach. 

Or to exceed thy Tether's reach : 
But to live round, and close, and wisely true 135 

To thine owne selfe ; and knowne to few. 
Thus let thy Rurall Sanctuary be 

Elizium to thy wife and thee ; 
There to disport your selves with golden measure : 

For seldome use commends tke pleasure. 140 

Live, and live blest ; thrice happy Paire ; Let Breath, 

But lost to one, be th' others death. 
And as there is one Love, one Faith, one Troth, 

Be so one Death, one Grave to both. 
Till when, in such assurance live, ye may 145 

Nor feare, or wish your dying day. 



Hesperides . 3 9 



Divination by a Daffadill. 

When a Daffadill I see, 
Hanging down his head t'wards me ; 
Guesse I niay, what I must be : 
First, I shall decline my head ; 
Secondly, I shall be dead ; 
Lastly, safely buryed. 



To the Painter, to draw him a 
Picture. 

Come, skilful! Lupo, now, and take 

Thy Bice, thy Umber, Pink, and Lake ; 

And let it be thy Pensils strife. 

To paint a Bridgeman to the life : 

Draw him as like too, as you can. 

An old, poore, lying, flatt'ring man : 

His cheeks be-pimpled, red and blue ; 

His nose and lips of mulbrie hiew. 

Then for an easie fansie ; place 

A Burling iron for his face : 

Next, make his cheeks with breath to swell, 

And for to speak, if possible : 

But do not so ; for feare, lest he 

She'd by his breathing, poyson thee. 



A Lyrick to Mirth. 

While the milder Fates consent, 
Let's enjoy our merryment : 
Drink, and dance, and pipe, and play ; 
Kisse our Dollies night and day : 
Crown'd with clusters of the Vine ; 
Let us sit, and quaffe our wine. 
Call on Bacchus ; chaunt his praise ; 
Shake the Thyrse, and bite the Bayes ; 



^o Hesperides. 

Rouze Anacreon from the dead ; 

And return him drunk to bed : k 

Sing o're Horace ; for ere long 

Death will come and mar the song : 

Then shall Wilson and Gotiere 

Never sing, or play more here, 

7*0 the Earle of Westmerland. 

When my date's done, and my gray age must die ; 
Nurse up, great Lord, this my posterity : 
Weak though it be ; long may it grow, and stand, 
Shor'd up by you, {Brave Earle of Westmerland.) 

Against Love. 

When ere my heart. Love's warmth, but entertaines, 
O Frost ! O Snow ! O Haile forbid the Banes. 
One drop now deads a spark ; but if the same 
Once gets a force. Floods cannot quench the flame. 
Rather then love, let me be ever lost ; 
Or let me 'gender with eternall frost. 

Upon Julia's Riband. 

As shews the Aire, when with a Rain-bow grac'd ; 
So smiles that Riband 'bout my Julians waste : 

Or like Nay 'tis that Zonulet of love. 

Wherein all pleasures of the world are wove. 

The frozen Zone: or, Julia disdainfull. 

Whither ? Say, whither shall I fly, 
To slack these flames wherein I frie ? 
To the Treasures, shall I goe. 
Of the Raine, Frost, Haile, and Snow ? 
Shall I search the under-ground, 
Where all Damps, and Mists are found ? 

A Lyrick to Mirth- 13 Gotiere] Coteire 1648: corr, in orig. Errata 



Hesperides. 4 1 

Shall I seek (for speedy ease) 

All the floods, and frozen seas ? 

Or descend into the deep, 

Where eternall cold does keep ? lo 

These may coole ; but there's a Zone 

Colder yet then any one : 

That's ray Julia's breast ; where dwels 

Such destructive Ysicles ; 

As that the Congelation will 15 

Me sooner starve, then those can kill. 



An Epitaph upon a sober Matron. 

With blamelesse carriage, I liv'd here. 
To' th' (almost) sev'n and fortieth yeare. 
Stout sons I had, and those twice three ; 
One onely daughter lent to me : 
The which was made a happy Bride, 
But thrice three Moones before she dy'd. 
My modest wedlock, that was known 
Contented with the bed of one. 



To the Patron of Poets, 
M. End: Porter. 

Let there be Patrons ; Patrons like to thee. 

Brave Porter ! Poets ne'r will wanting be : 

Fabius, and Cotta, Lentulus, all live 

In thee, thou Man of Men ! who here do'st give 

Not onely subject-matter for our wit, 

But likewise Oyle of Maintenance to it : 

For which, before thy Threshold, we'll lay downe 

Our Thyrse, for Scepter ; and our Bales for Crown. 

For to say truth, all Garlands are thy due ; 

The Laurell, Mirtle, Oke, and Ivie too. 



4-2 Hesperides. 

'The sadnesse of things for Sapho's sicknesse. 

Lillies will languish ; Violets look ill ; 

Sickly the Prim-rose : Pale the Daffadill : 

That gallant Tulip will hang down his head. 

Like to a Virgin newly ravished. 

Pansies will weep ; and Marygolds will wither ; 

And keep a Fast, and Funerall together. 

If Sapho droop ; Daisies will open never, 

But bid Good-night, and close their lids for ever. 



Leanders Obsequies. 

When as Leander young was drown'd, 
No heart by love receiv'd a wound ; 
But on a Rock himselfe sate by, 
There weeping sup'rabundantly. 
Sighs numberlesse he cast about. 
And all his Tapers thus put out : 
His head upon his hand he laid ; 
And sobbing deeply, thus he said, 
Ah cruell Sea ! and looking on't. 
Wept as he'd drowne the Hellespont, 
And sure his tongue had more exprest. 
But that his teares forbad the rest. 



Hope heartens. 

None goes to warfare, but with this intent ; 
The gaines must dead the feare of detriment. 



Foure things make us happy here. 

Health is the first good lent to men ; 
A gentle disposition then : 
Next, to be rich by no by-wayes ; 
Lastly, with friends t'enjoy our dayes. 



Hesperides. 43 



His parting from M" Dorothy Keneday. 

When I did goe from thee, I felt that smart, 

Which Bodies do, when Souls from them depart. 

Thou did'st not mind it ; though thou then might'st see 

Me turn'd to tears ; yet did'st not weep for me. 

'Tis true, I kist thee ; but I co'd not heare 

Thee spend a sigh, t'accompany my teare. 

Me thought 'twas strange, that thou so hard sho'dst prove, 

Whose heart, whose hand, whose ev'ry part spake love. 

Prethee (lest Maids sho'd censure thee) but say 

Thou shed'st one teare, when as I went away ; 

And that will please me somewhat : though I know, 

And Love will swear't, my Dearest did not so. 



The Teare sent to her from Stanes. 

Glide, gentle streams, and beare 
Along with you my teare 

To that coy Girle ; 

Who smiles, yet slayes 

Me with delayes ; 5 

And strings my tears as Pearle. 

See ! see she's yonder set. 
Making a Carkanet 

Of Maiden-flowers ! 

There, there present lo 

This Orient, 
And Pendant Pearle of ours. 

Then say, I've sent one more 
Jem to enrich her store ; 

And that is all i$ 

Which I can send. 

Or vainly spend. 
For tears no more will fall. 



44 Hesperides. 



4. Nor will I seek supply 

Of them, the spring's once drie ; ao 

But He devise, 

(Among the rest) 

A way that's best 
How I may save mine eyes. 

5. Yet say ; sho'd she condemne 35 
Me to surrender them ; 

Then say ; my part 
Must be to weep 
Out them, to keep 
A poore, yet loving heart. 30 

6. Say too. She wo'd have this ; 
She shall : Then my hope is, 

That when I'm poore, 
And nothing have 

To send, or save ; 35 

I'm sure she'll ask no more. 



Upon one I^illie, who marryed with a 
maid caltd Rose. 

What times of sweetnesse this faire day fore-shows, 
When as the Lilly marries with the Rose ! 
What next is lookt for ? but we all sho'd see 
To spring from these a sweet Posterity. 



An Epitaph upon a child. 

Virgins promis'd when I dy'd, 
That they wo'd each Primrose-tide, 
Duely, Morne and Ev'ning, come, 
And with flowers dresse my Tomb. 
Having promis'd, pay your debts, 
Maids, and here strew Violets. 



Hesperides. 4 5 

The Houre-glasse. 



That Houre-glasse, which there ye see 
With Water fill'd, (Sirs, credit me) 
The liumour was, (as I have read) 
But Lovers tears inchristalled, 
Which, as they drop by drop doe passe 
From th' upper to the under-glasse, 
Do in a trickling manner tell, 
(By many a watrie syllable) 
That Lovers tears in life-time shed, 
Do restless run when they are dead. 



His fare-well to Sack. 



Farewell thou Thing, time-past so knowne, so deare 

To me, as blood to life and spirit : Neare, 

Nay, thou more neare then kindred, friend, man, wife, 

Male to the female, soule to body : Life 

To quick action, or the warme soft side 5 

Of the resigning, yet resisting Bride. 

The kisse of Virgins ; First-fruits of the bed ; 

Soft speech, smooth touch, the Hps, the Maiden-head : 

These, and a thousand sweets, co'd never be 

So neare, or deare, as thou wast once to me. lo 

O thou the drink of Gods, and Angels ! Wine 

That scatter'st Spirit and Lust ; whose purest shine. 

More radiant then the Summers Sun-beams shows ; 

Each way illustrious, brave ; and like to those 

Comets we see by night j whose shagg'd portents 15 

Fore-tell the comming of some dire events : 

Or some full flame, which with a pride aspires. 

Throwing about his wild, and active fires. 

'Tis thou, above Nectar, O Divinest soule ! 

(Eternall in thy self) that canst controule ao 

That, which subverts whole nature, grief and care ; 

Vexation of the mind, and damn'd Despaire. 

'Tis thou, alone, who with thy Mistick Fan, 

Work'st more then Wisdome, Art, or Nature can, 



46 Hesperides. 



To rouze the sacred madnesse ; and awake ae 

The frost-bound-blood, and spirits ; and to make 

Them frantick with thy raptures, flashing through 

The soule, like lightning, and as active too. 

'Tis not Apollo can, or those thrice three 

Castalian Sisters, sing, if wanting thee. 30 

Horace, Anacreon both had lost their fame, 

Hadst thou not fill'd them with thy fire and flame. 

Phcebean splendour ! and thou Thespian spring ! 

Of which, sweet Swans must drink, before they sing 

Their true-pac'd-Numbers, and their Holy-Layes, 35 

Which makes them worthy Cedar, and the Bayes. 

But why ? why longer doe I gaze upon 

Thee with the eye of admiration ? 

Since I must leave thee ; and enforc'd, must say 

To all thy witching beauties, Goe, Away. 40 

But if thy whimpring looks doe ask me why ? 

Then know, that Nature bids thee goe, not I. 

'Tis her erroneous self has made a braine 

Uncapable of such a Soveraigne, 

As is thy powerful selfe. Prethee not smile ; 45 

Or smile more inly ; lest thy looks beguile 

My vowes denounc'd in zeale, which thus much show thee, 

That I have sworn, but by thy looks to know thee. 

Let others drink thee freely j and desire 

Thee and their lips espous'd ; while I admire, 50 

And love thee ; but not taste thee. Let my Muse 

Faile of thy former helps ; and onely use 

Her inadult'rate strength : what's done by me 

Hereafter, shall smell of the Lamp, not thee. 



Upon Mrs. Eliz: Wheeler, under the name of 
Amarillis. 



Sweet Amarillis, by a Spring's 
Soft and soule-melting murmurings, 
Slept ; and thus sleeping, thither flew 
A Robin- Red-brest ; who at view, 
Not seeing her at all to stir, 
Brought leaves and mosse to cover her : 



Hesperides, 47 



But while he, perking, there did prie 
About the Arch of either eye ; 
The lid began to let out day ', 
At which poore Robin flew away : 

And seeing her not dead, but all disleav'd ; 

He chirpt for joy, to see himself disceav'd. 



To Myrrha hard-hearted. 

Fold now thine armes ; and hang the head, 

Like to a Lillie withered : 

Next, look thou like a sickly Moone ; 

Or X'^'&Jocasta in a swoone. 

Then weep, and sigh, and softly goe, 6 

Like to a widdow drown'd in woe : 

Or like a Virgin full of ruth. 

For the lost sweet-heart of her youth : 

And all because, Faire Maid, thou art 

Insensible of all my smart ; lo 

And of those evill dayes that be 

Now posting on to punish thee. 

The Gods are easie,.and condemne 

All such as are not soft like them. 



The Eye. 

Make me a heaven ; and make me there 
Many a lesse and greater spheare. 
Make me the straight, and oblique lines ; 
The Motions, Lations, and the Signes. 
Make me a Chariot, and a Sun ; 
And let them through a Zodiac run : 
Next, place me Zones, and Tropicks there ; 
With all the Seasons of the Yeare. 
Make me a Sun-set ; and a Night : 
And then present the Mornings-light 
Cloath'd in her Chamlets of Delight. 



4 8 Hesperides. 



To these, make Clouds to poure downe raine ; 

With weather foule, then faire againe. 

And when, wise Artist, that thou hast. 

With all that can be, this heaven grac't ; 15 

Ah ! what is then this curious skie, 

But onely my Corinna's eye ? 



Upon the much lamented, 
Mr. J. Warr. 

What Wisdome, Learning, Wit, or Worth, 
Youth, or sweet Nature, co'd bring forth, 
Rests here with him ; who was the Fame, 
The Volumne of himselfe, and Name. 
If, Reader, then thou wilt draw neere, 
And doe an honour to thy teare ; 
Weep then for him, for whom laments 
Not one, but many Monuments. 



The suspition upon his over-much familiarity 
with a Gentlewoman. 

And must we part, because some say. 
Loud is our love, and loose our play, 
And more then well becomes the day ? 
Alas for pitty ! and for us 
Most innocent, and injur'd thus. 
Had we kept close, or play'd within, 
Suspition now had been the sinne, 
And shame had foUow'd long ere this, 
T'ave plagu'd, what now unpunisht is. 
But we as fearlesse of the Sunne, 
As faultlesse ; will not wish undone. 
What now is done : since where no sin 
Unbolts the doore, no shame comes in. 



Hespertdes. 49 

Then comely and most fragrant Maid, 

Be you more warie, then afraid 15 

Of these Reports ; because you see 

The fairest most suspected be. 

The common formes have no one eye, 

Or eare of burning jealousie 

To follow them : but chiefly, where so 

Love makes the cheek, and chin a sphere 

To dance and play in : (Trust me) there 

Suspicion questions every haire. 

Come, you are faire ; and sho'd be seen 

While you are in your sprightfull green : 25 

And what though you had been embrac't 

By me, were you for that unchast ? 

No, no, no more then is yond' MoonCj 

Which shining in her perfect Noone ; 

In all that great and glorious light, 30 

Continues cold, as is the night. 

Then, beauteous Maid, you may retire ; 

And as for me, my chast desire 

Shall move t'wards you ; although I see 

Your face no more : So live you free 35 

From Fames black lips, as you from me. 



Single life most secure. 

Suspicion, Discontent, and Strife, 
Come in for Dowrie with a Wife. 



The Curse. A Song. 

Goe, perjur'd man ; and if thou ere return 
To see the small remainders in mine Urne : 
When thou shalt laugh at my Religious dust \ 
And ask, Where's now the colour, forme and trust 
Of Womans beauty ? and with hand more rude 
Rifle the Flowers which the Virgins strew'd : 
Know. I have pray'd to Furie, that some wind 
May blow my ashes up, and strike thee blind. 

E 



5 o Hesperides. 

The wounded Cupid. Song. 

Cupid as he lay among 

Roses, by a Bee was stung. 

Whereupon in anger flying 

To his Mother, said thus crying ; 

Help ! O help ! your Boy's a dying. 5 

And why, my pretty Lad, said she ? 

Then blubbering, replyed he, 

A winged Snake has bitten me, 

Which Country people call a Bee. 

At which she smil'd ; then with her hairs lo 

And kisses drying up his tears : 

Alas ! said she, my Wag ! if this 

Such a pernicious torment is : 

Come tel me then, how great's the smart 

Of those, thou woundest with thy Dart ! 15 



To Dewes. A Song. 

I burn, I burn ; and beg of you 

To quench, or coole me with your Dew. 

I frie in fire, and so consume, 

Although the Pile be all perfume. 

Alas ! the heat and death's the same ; 

Whether by choice, or common flame : 

To be in Oyle of looses drown'd. 

Or water ; where's the comfort found ? 

Both bring one death ; and I die here, 

Unlesse you coole me with a Teare : 

Alas ! I call ; but ah 1 I see 

Ye coole, and comfort all, but me. 



Some comfort in calamity. 

To conquer'd men, some comfort 'tis to fall 
By th'hand of him who is the Generall. 



Hesperides. 5 * 



The Vision. 

Sitting alone (as one forsook) 

Close by a Silver-shedding Brook ; 

With hands held up to Love, I wept ; 

And after sorrowes spent, I slept : 

Then in a Vision I did see 5 

A glorious forme appeare to me : 

A Virgins face she had ; her dresse 

Was like a sprightly Spartanesse. 

A silver bow with green silk strung, 

Down from her comely shoulders hung : lo 

And as she stood, the wanton Aire 

Dandled the ringlets of her haire. 

Her legs were such Diana shows. 

When tuckt up she a hunting goes ; 

With Buskins shortned to descrie 15 

The happy dawning of her thigh : 

Which when I saw, I made accesse 

To kisse that tempting nakednesse : 

But she forbad me, with a wand 

Of Mirtle she had in her hand : ao 

And chiding me, said. Hence, Remove, 

Uerrick, thou art too coorse to love. 



Love me little, love me long. 

You say, to me-wards your affection's strong ; 
Pray love me little, so you love me long. 
Slowly goes farre : The meane is best : Desire 
Grown violent, do's either die, or tire. 



Upon a Virgin kissing a Rose. 

'Twas but a single J?ose, 
Till you on it did breathe ; 

But since (me thinks) it shows 
Not so much Jiose, as Wreathe. 



5 2 Hesperides. 

Upon a Wife that dyed mad with Jeahusie. 

In this little Vault she lyes, 
Here J with all her jealousies : 
Quiet yet ; but if ye make 
Any noise, they both will wake, 
And such spirits raise, 'twill then 
Trouble Death to lay agen. 



Upon the Bishop o/"Lincolne's Imprisonment. 

Never was Day so over-sick with showres. 

But that it had some intermitting houres. 

Never was Night so tedious, but it knew 

The Last Watch out, and saw the Dawning too. 

Never was Dungeon so obscurely deep. 

Wherein or Light, or Day, did never peep. 

Never did Moone so ebbe, or seas so wane, 

But they left Hope-seed to fill up againe. 

So you, my Lord, though you have now your stay. 

Your Night, your Prison, and your Ebbe ; you may 

Spring up afresh ; when all these mists are spent, 

And Star-like, once more, guild our Firmament. 

Let but That Mighty Cesar speak, and then, 

All bolts, all barres, all gates shall cleave ; as when 

That Earth-quake shook the house, and gave the stout 

Apostles, way (unshackled) to goe out. 

This, as I wish for, so I hope to see ; 

Though you (my Lord) have been unkind to me : 

To wound my heart, and never to apply, 

(When you had power) the meanest remedy : 

Well ; though my griefe by you was gall'd, the more ; 

Yet I bring Balme and Oile to heal your sore. 



Disswasions from Idlenesse. 

Cynthius pluck ye by the eare. 
That ye may good doctrine heare. 
Play not with the maiden-haire ; 
For each Ringlet there's a snare. 



Hesperides, 5 3 

Cheek, and eye, and lip, and chin ; 5 

These are traps to take fooles in. 

Armes, and hands, and all parts else. 

Are but Toiles, or Manicles 

Set on purpose to enthrall 

Men, but Slothfulls most of all. lo 

Live employ'd, and so live free 

From these fetters ; like to me 

Who have found, and still can prove. 

The lazie man the most doth love. 



An Epithalamie to Sir Thomas Southwell 
and his Ladie. 

I. 

Now, novr's the time ; so oft by truth 
Promis'd sho'd come to crown your youth. 

Then Faire ones, doe not wrong 

Your joyes, by staying long : 

Or let Love's fire goe out, 

By lingring thus in doubt : 

But learn, that Time once lost. 

Is ne'r redeem'd by cost. 
Then away ; come. Hymen guide 
To the bed, the bashfuU Bride. 



IL 

Is it (sweet maid) your fault these holy 
Bridall-Rites goe on so slowly ? 

Deare, is it this you dread. 

The losse of Maiden-head ? 

Beleeve me ; you will most ^5 

Esteeme it when 'tis lost : 

Then it no longer keep. 

Lest Issue lye asleep. 
Then away ; come, Hymen guide 
To the bed, the bashfuU Bride. ao 



54 Hesperides. 



III. 

These Precious-Pearly-Purling teares, 
But spring from ceremonious feares. 

And 'tis but Native shame, 

That hides the loving flame : 

And may a while controule 25 

The soft and am'rous soule ; 

But yet, Loves fire will wast 

Such bashfulnesse at last. 
Then away ; come, Hymen guide 
To the bed, the bashfull Bride. 30 

IV. 

Night now hath watch'd her self half blind ; 
Yet not a Maiden-head resign'd ! 

'Tis strange, ye will not flie 

To Love's sweet mysterie. 

Might yon Full-Moon the sweets 35 

Have, promis'd to your sheets ; 

She soon wo'd leave her spheare. 

To be admitted there. 
Then away ; come, Hymen guide 
To the bed, the bashfull Bride. 40 

V. 
On, on devoutly, make no stay ; 
While Domiduca leads the way : 

And Genius who attends 

The bed for luckie ends : 

With _/««(? goes the houres, 45 

And Graces strewing flowers. 

And the boyes with sweet tunes sing, 

Hymen, O Hymen bring 
Home the Turtles ; Hymen guide 
To the bed, the bashfull Bride. 50 

VI. 

Behold ! how Hymens Taper-light 

Shews you how much is spent of night- 
See, see the Bride-grooms Torch 
Halfe wasted in the porch. 



Hesperides. 5 5 

And now those Tapers five, 65 

That shew the womb shall thrive : 

Their silv'rie flames advance, 

To tell all prosp'rous chance 
Still shall crown the happy life 
Of the good man and the wife. 60 

VII. 
Move forward then your Rosie feet. 
And make, what ere they touch, turn sweet. 

May all, like flowrie Meads 

Smell, where your soft foot treads ; 

And every thing assume 65 

To it, the like perfume : 

As Zephirus when he 'spires 

Through Woodbine, and Sweet-bryers. 
Then away ; come Hymen, guide 
To the bed the bashfull Bride. 7° 

VIII. 
And now the yellow Vaile, at last, 
Over her fragrant cheek is cast. 

Now seems she to expresse 

A bashfull willingnesse : 

Shewing a heart consenting ; ?S 

As with a will repenting. 

Then gently lead her on 

With wise suspicion : ' 
For that, Matrons say, a measure 
Of that Passion sweetens Pleasure. 80 

IX. 
You, you that be of her neerest kin. 
Now o're the threshold force her in. 

But to avert the worst ; 

Let her, her fillets first ■ 

Knit to the posts : this point 8s 

Remembring, to anoint 

The sides : for 'tis a charme 

Strong against future harme : 
And the evil deads, the which 
There was hidden by the Witch. 90 



^ 6 Hesperides. 



X. 

O Venus ! thou, to whom is known 
The best way how to loose the Zone 

Of Virgins ! Tell the Maid, 

She need not be afraid : 

And bid the Youth apply 95 

Close kisses, if she cry : 

And charge, he not forbears 

Her, though she wooe with teares. 
Tel them, now they must adventer, 
Since that Love and Night bid enter. 100 

XI. 
No Fatal Owie the Bedsted keeps, 
With direful notes to fright your sleeps : 

No Furies, here about, 

To put the Tapers out, 

Watch, or did make the bed : 105 

'Tis Omen full of dread : 

But all faire signs appeare 

Within the Chamber here. 
Juno here, far off, doth stand 
Cooling sleep with charming wand. 110 

XII. 
Virgins, weep not ; 'twill come, when. 
As she, so you'l be ripe for men. 

Then grieve her not, with saying 

She must no more a Maying : 

Or by Rose-buds devine, 115 

Who'l be her Valentine. 

Nor name those wanton reaks 

Y'ave had at Barly-breaks. 
But now kisse her, and thus say, 
Take time Lady while ye may. lao 

XIII. 
Now barre the doors, the Bride-groom puts 
The eager Boyes to gather Nuts. 

And now, both Love and Time 

To their full height doe clime ; 



Hesperides. 5 7 

O ! give them active heat 135 

And moisture, both compleat : 

Fit Organs for encrease, 

To keep, and to release 
That, which may the honour'd Stem 
Circle with a Diadem. rjo 

XIV. 
And now. Behold ! the Bed or Couch 
That ne'r knew Brides, or Bride-grooms touch, 

Feels in it selfe a fire ; 

And tickled with Desire, 

Pants with a Downie brest, 135 

As with a heart possest : 

Shrugging as it did move, 

Ev'n with the soule of love. 
And (oh !) had it but a tongue, 
DoveSj 'two'd say, yee bill too long. 140 

XV. 
O enter then ! but see ye shun 
A sleep, untill the act be done. 

Let kisses, in their close, 

Breathe as the Damask Rose : 

Or sweet, as is that gumme 145 

Doth from Panchaia come. 

Teach Nature now to know, 

Lips can make Cherries grow 
Sooner, then she, ever yet. 
In her wisdome co'd beget. 150 

XVI. 
On your minutes, hours, dayes, months, years, 
Drop the fat blessing of the sphears. 

That good, which Heav'n can give 

To make you bravely live ; 

Fall, hke a spangling dew, 155 

By day, and night on you. 

May Fortunes Lilly-hand 

Open at your command ; 
With all luckie Birds to side 
With the Bride-groom, and the Bride, 160 



5 8 Hesperides. 



XVII. 

Let bounteous Fate your spindles full 
Fill, and winde up with whitest wooll. 

Let them not cut the thred 

Of life, untill ye bid. 

May Death yet come at last ; 165 

And not with desp'rate hast : 

But when ye both can say. 

Come, Let us now away. 
Be ye to the Barn then born, 
Two, like two ripe shocks of corn. 170 



Teares are Tongues. 

When Julia chid, I stood as mute the while, 

As is the fish, or tonguelesse Crocadile. 

Aire coyn'd to words, ray Julia co'd not heare; 

But she co'd see each eye to stamp a teare : 

By which, mine angry Mistresse might descry, 

Teares are the noble language of the eye. 

And when true love of words is destitute, 

The Eyes by tears speak, while the Tongue is mute. 



Upon a young mother of many children. 

Let all chaste Matrons, when they chance to see 
My num'rous issue : Praise, and pitty me. 
Praise me, for having such a fruitfull wombe ; 
Pity me too, who found so soone a Tomb. 

To Electra. 

lie come to thee in all those shapes 
As Jove did, when he made his rapes : 
Onely, He not appeare to thee. 
As he did once to Semele. 
Thunder and Lightning He lay by, 
To talk with thee familiarly. 
Which done, then quickly we'll undresse 
To one and th'others nakednesse. 



Hesperides. 5 9 



And ravisht, plunge into the bed, 
(Bodies and souls commingled) 
And kissing, so as none may heare. 
We'll weary all the Fables there. 



His wish. 

It is sufficient if we pray 
To Jove, who gives, and takes away : 
Let him the Land and Living finde ; 
Let me alone to fit the mind. 



His Protestation to Perilla. 

Noone-day and Midnight shall at once be seene : 
Trees, at one time, shall be both sere and greene : 
Fire and water shall together lye 
In one-self-sweet-conspiring sympathie : 
Summer and Winter shall at one time show 
Ripe eares of come, and up to th'eares in snow : 
Seas shall be sandlesse ; Fields devoid of grasse ; 
Shapelesse the world (as when all Chaos was) 
Before, my deare Perilla, I will be 
False to my vow, or fall away from thee. 



Love perfumes all parts. 

If I kisse Anthea's brest, 
There I smell the Phenix nest : 
If her lip, the most sincere 
Altar of Incense, I smell there. 
Hands, and thighs, and legs, are all 
Richly Aromaticall. 
Goddesse Ists cann't transfer 
Musks and Ambers more from her : 
Nor c&n Juno sweeter be, 
When she lyes viithjove, then she. 



6o Hesperides. 

To Julia. 

Permit me, Julia, now to goe away ; 

Or by thy love, decree me here to stay. 

If thou wilt say, that I shall live with thee ; 

Here shall my endless Tabernacle be : 

If not, (as banisht) I will live alone 

There, where no language ever yet was known. 



On himself e. 

Love-sick I am, and must endure 
A desp'rate grief, that finds no cure. 
Ah me ! I try ; and trying, prove, 
No Herbs have power to cure Love. 
Only one Soveraign salve, I know, 
And that is Death, the end of Woe. 



Vertue is sensible of suffering. 

Though a wise man all pressures can sustaine ; 
His vertue still is sensible of paine : 
Large shoulders though he has, and well can beare, 
He feeles when Packs do pinch him ; and the where. 



Tke cruell Maid. 

And Cruell Maid, because I see 
You scornfull of my love, and me : 
He trouble you no more ; but goe 
My way, where you shall never know 
What is become of me : there I 
Will find me out a path to die ; 
Or learne some way how to forget 
You, and your name, for ever : yet 

On kimselfe, 5 Only one] Onely our t6^8 : corr. in prig. Errata. 



Hesperides. 6 1 

Ere I go hence ; know this from me, 

What will, in time, your Fortune be : lo 

This to your coynesse I will tell ; 

And having spoke it once, Farewell. 

The Lillie will not long endure ; 

Nor the Snow continue pure : 

The Rose, the Violet, one day 15 

See, both these Lady-flowers decay : 

And you must fade, as well as they. 

And it may chance that Love may turn, 

And (like to mine) make your heart burn 

And weep to see't ; yet this thing doe, ao 

That my last Vow commends to you : 

When you shall see that I am dead. 

For pitty let a teare be shed ; 

And (with your Mantle o're me cast) 

Give my cold lips a kisse at last : 25 

If twice you kisse, you need not feare. 

That I shall stir, or live more here. 

Next, hollow out a Tombe to cover 

Me ; me, the most despised Lover : 

And write thereon. This, Reader, know, 30 

Love kilPd this man. No more but so. 



To Dianeme. 

Sweet, be not proud of those two eyes, 
Which Star-like sparkle in their skies : 
Nor be you proud, that you can see 
All hearts your captives ; yours, yet free : 
Be you not proud of that rich haire. 
Which wantons with the Love-sick aire : 
When as that Rubie, which you weare, 
Sunk from the tip of your soft eare. 
Will last to be a precious Stone, 
When all your world of Beautie's gone. 



6 2 Hesperides. 

TO THE KING, 

To cure the Evill. 

To find that Tree of Life, whose Fruits did feed, 

And Leaves did heale, all sick of humane seed : 

To finde Bethesda, and an Angel there, 

Stirring the waters, I am come ; and here. 

At last, I find, (after my much to doe) 6 

The Tree, Bethesda, and the Angel too : 

And all in Your Blest Hand, which has the powers 

Of all those suppling-healing herbs and flowers. 

To that soft Charm, that Spell, that Magick Bough, 

That high Enchantment I betake me now : lo 

And to that Hand, (the Branch of Heavens faire Tree) 

I kneele for help ; O ! lay that hand on me, 

Adored Cesar ! and my Faith is such, 

I shall be heal'd, if that my King but touch. 

The Evill is not Yours : my sorrow sings, 15 

Mine is the Evill, but the Cure, the Kings. 



His misery in a Mistresse. 

Water, Water I espie : 

Come, and coole ye ; all who frie 

In your loves ; but none as I. 

Though a thousand showres be 

Still a falling, yet I see 

Not one drop to light on me. 

Happy you, who can have seas 
For to quench ye, or some ease 
From your kinder Mistresses. 



Mesperides. 6 3 

I have one, and she alone, lo 

Of a thousand thousand known, 
Dead to all compassion. 

Such an one, as will repeat 

Both the cause, and make the heat 

More by Provocation great. 15 

Gentle friends, though I despaire 
Of my cure, doe you beware 
Of those Girles, which cruell are. 



To a Gentlewoman objecting to him 
his gray haires. 

Am I despis'd, because you say. 

And I dare sweare, that I am gray ? 

Know, Lady, you have but your day : 

And time will come when you shall weare 

Such frost and snow upon your haire : 5 

And when (though long it comes to passe) 

You question with your Looking-glasse ; 

And in that sincere Chrisiall see]ii, 

But find no Rose-bud in your cheek : 

Nor any bed to give the shew 10 

Where such a rare Carnation grew. 

Ah ! then too late, close in your chamber keeping. 

It will be told 

That you are old; 
By those true teares y'are weeping. 15 



To Cedars. 

If 'mongst my many Poems, I can see 
One, onely, worthy to be washt by thee : 
I live for ever ; let the rest all lye 
In dennes of Darkness, or condemn'd to die. 



64 Mesperides, 

Upon Cupid. 

Love, like a Gypsie, lately came ; 

And did me much importune 
To see my hand; that by the same 

He might fore-tell my Fortune. 

He saw my Palme ; and then, said he, 
I tell thee, by this score here ; 

That thou, within few months, shalt be 
The youthfuU Prince D^ Amour here. 



I smil'd ; and bade him once more prove, 
And by some crosse-line show it ; 

That I co'd ne'r be Prince of Love, 
Though here the Princely Poet. 



How Primroses came ^een. 

Virgins, time-past, known were these, 
Troubled with Green-sicknesses, 
Turn'd to flowers : Stil the hieu 
Sickly Girles, they beare of you. 



To Jos: Lo\ Bishop of Exeter. 

Whom sho'd I feare to write to, if I can 

Stand before you, my learn'd Diocesan ? 

And never shew blood-guiltinesse, or feare 

To see my Lines Excathedrated here. 

Since none so good are, but you may condemne 

Or here so bad, but you may pardon them. 

If then, (my Lord) to sanctifie my Muse 

One onely Poem out of all you'l chuse ; 

And mark it for a Rapture nobly writ, 

'Tis Good Confirm'd ; for you have Bishop't it. 



Hesperides. 6 5 

Upon a black Twist, rounding the Arme of the 

Countesse o/'Carlile. 

I saw about her spotlesse wrist, 

Of blackest silk, a curious twist ; 

Which, circumvolving gently, there 

Enthrall'd her Arme, as Prisoner. 

Dark was the Jayle ; but as if light 5 

Had met t'engender with the night ; 

Or so, as Darknesse made a stay 

To shew at once, both night and day. 

One ' fancie more ! but if there be 

Such Freedome in Captivity ; lo 

I beg of Love, that ever I 

May in like Chains of Darknesse lie. 

On himselfe. 

I feare no Earthly Powers ; 

But care for crowns of flowers : 

And love to have my Beard 

With Wine and Oile besmear'd. 

This day He drowne all sorrow ; 6 

Who knowes to live to morrow ? 



A Ring presented to Julia. 

Julia, I bring 

To thee this Ring. 
Made for thy finger fit ; 

To shew by this, 

That our love is S 

(Or sho'd be) like to it. 

Close though it be. 

The joynt is free : 
So when Love's yoke is on, 

It must not gall, lo 

Or fret at all 
With hard oppression. 

' In the original ' I ' ; the compositor mistook the roman numeral I for a pronoun 



66 Hesperides. 



But it must play 

Still either way ; 
And be, too, such a yoke, 15 

As not too wide. 

To over-slide ; 
Or be so strait to choak. 

So we, who beare, 

This beame, must reare ao 

Our selves to such a height : 

As that the stay 

Of either may 
Create the burden light. 

And as this round 15 

Is no where found 
To flaw, or else to sever : 

So let our love 

As endless prove ; 
And pure as Gold for ever. 30 



To the Detracter. 

Where others love, and praise my Verses ; still 

Thy long-black-Thumb-nail marks 'em out for ill : 

A fellon take it, or some Whit-flaw come 

For to unslate, or to untile that thumb ! 

But cry thee Mercy : Exercise thy nailes 

To scratch or claw, so that thy tongue not railes : 

Some numbers prurient are, and some of these 

Are wanton with their itch ; scratch, and 'twill please. 



Upon the same. 

I ask't thee oft, what Poets thou hast read, 
And lik'st the best? Still thou reply'st. The dead. 
I shall, ere long, with green turfs cover'd be ; 
Then sure thou't like, or thou wilt envie me. 



V V 



Hesperides, 67 

Julia's Petticoat. 

Thy Azure Robe, I did behold, 

As ayrie as the leaves of gold ; 

Which erring here, and wandring there, 

Pleas'd with transgression ev'ry where : 

Sometimes 'two'd pant, and sigh, and heave, 5 

As if to stir it scarce had leave : 

But having got it ; thereupon, 

'Two'd make a brave expansion. 

And pounc't with Stars, it shew'd to me 

Like a Celestiall Canopie. 10 

Sometimes 'two'd blaze, and then abate. 

Like to a flame growne moderate : 

Sometimes away 'two'd wildly fling ; 

Then to thy thighs so closely cling, 

That some conceit did melt me downe, 15 

As Lovers fall into a swoone : 

And all confus'd, I there did lie 

Drown'd in Delights ; but co'd not die. 

That Leading Cloud, I follow'd still. 

Hoping t'ave seene of it my fill ; 20 

But ah ! I co'd not : sho'd it move 

To Life Eternal, I co'd love. 



To Mustek. 

Begin to charme, and as thou stroak'st mine eares 
With thy enchantment, melt me into tears. 
Then let thy active hand scu'd o're thy Lyre : 
And make my spirits frantick with the fire. 
That done, sink down into a silv'rie straine ; 
And make me smooth as Balme, and Oile againe. 



Distrust. 

To safe-guard Man from wrongs, there nothing must 
Be truer to him, then a wise Distrust. 
And to thy selfe be best this sentence knowne, 
Heare all men speak ; but credit few or none. 



68 Hesperides. 

Corinna's going a Maying. 

Get up, get up for shame, the Blooming Morne 
Upon her wings presents the god unshorne. 
See how Aurora throwes her faire 
Fresh- quilted colours through the aire : 
Get up, sweet-Slug-a-bed, and see 
The Dew-bespangling Herbe and Tree. 
Each Flower has wept, and bow'd toward the East, 
Above an houre since ; yet you not drest. 
Nay ! not so much as out of bed ? 
When all the Birds have Mattens seyd, 
And sung their thankfull Hymnes : 'tis sin, 
Nay, profanation to keep in. 
When as a thousand Virgins on this day, 
Spring, sooner then the Lark, to fetch in May. 



Rise ; and put on your Foliage, and be seene 15 

To come forth, like the Spring-time, fresh and greene ; 

And sweet as Flora. Take no care 

For Jewels for your Gowne, or Haire : 

Feare not ; the leaves will strew 

Gemms in abundance upon you : 30 

Besides, the childhood of the Day has kept, 
Against you come, some Orient Pearls unwept : 

Come, and receive them while the light 

Hangs on the Dew-locks of the night : 

And Titan on the Eastern hill as 

Retires himselfe, or else stands still 
Till you come forth. Wash, dresse, be briefe in praying : 
Few Beads are best, when once we goe a Maying. 

Come, my Corinna, come ; and comming, marke 

How each field turns a street ; each street a Parke 30 

Made green, and trimm'd with trees : see how 

Devotion gives each House a Bough, 

Or Branch : Each Porch, each doore, ere this. 

An Arke a Tabernacle is 
Made up of white-thorn neatly enterwove ; 35 

As if here were those cooler shades of love. 



Hesperides, 69 

Can such delights be in the street, 

And open fields, and we not see't ? 

Come, we'll abroad ; and let's obay 

The Proclamation made for May : 40 

And sin no more, as we have done, by staying ; 
But my Corinna, come, let's goe a Maying. 

There's not a budding Boy, or Girle, this day. 
But is got up, and gone to bring in May. 

A deale of Youth, ere this, is come 45 

Back, and with White-thorn laden home. 

Some have dispatcht their Cakes and Creame, 

Before that we have left to dreame : 
And some have wept, and woo'd, and plighted Troth, 
And chose their Priest, ere we can cast off sloth : 50 

Many a green-gown has been given ; 

Many a kisse, both odde and even : 

Many a glance too has been sent 

From out the eye. Loves Firmament : 
Many a jest told of the Keyes betraying 55 

This night, and Locks pickt, yet w'are not a Maying. 

Come, let us goe, while we are in our prime ; 
And take the harmlesse follie of the time. 

We shall grow old apace, and die 

Before we know our liberty. 60 

Our life is short ; and our dayes run 

As fast away as do's the Sunne : 
And as a vapour, or a drop of raine 
Once lost, can ne'r be found againe : 

So when or you or I are made 65 

A fable, song, or fleeting shade ; 

All love, all liking, all delight 

Lies drown'd with us in endlesse night. 
Then while time serves, and we are but decaying ; 
Come, my Corinna, come, let's goe a Maying. 70 

On Julia's breath. 

Breathe, Julia, breathe, and He protest, 

Nay more. He deeply sweare, 
That all the Spices of the East 

Are circumfused there. 



70, Hesperides. 

Upon a Child. An Epitaph, 

But borne, and like a short Delight, 
I glided by my Parents sight. 
That done, the harder Fates deny'd 
My longer stay, and so I dy'd. 
If pittying my sad Parents Teares, 
You'l spil a tear, or two with theirs : 
And with some flowrs my grave bestrew, 
Love and they'l thank you for't. Adieu. 



A Dialogue betwixt Horace and Lydia, Translated 
Anno 1627. and set by Mr. Ro: Ramsey. 

Hor. While, Lydia, I was lov'd of thee. 
Nor any was preferr'd 'fore me 
To hug thy whitest neck : Then I, 
The Persian King liv'd not more happily. 

Lyd. While thou no other didst affect, 5 

Nor Cloe was of more respect ; 
Then Lydia, far-fam'd Lydia, 
I flourish't more then Roman Ilia. 

Hor. Now Thracian Cloe governs me, 

Skilfull i' th' Harpe, and Melodic : 10 

For whose affection, Lydia, I 

(So Fate spares her) am well content to die. 

Lyd. My heart now set on fire is 

By Ornithes Sonne, young Calais ; 

For whose commutuall flames here I 15 

(To save his life) twice am content to die. 

Hor. Say our first loves we sho'd revoke, 
And sever'd, joyne in brazen yoke : 
Admit I Cloe put away, 
And love againe love-cast-off Lydia ? ao 



Hesperides. 7 1 



Lyd. Though mine be brighter then the Star ; 
Thou lighter then the Cork by far : 
Rough as th' Adratick sea, yet I 
Will live with thee, or else for thee will die. 



The captiv'd Bee : or, 
The little Fikher. 

As Julia once a-slumb'ring lay, 

It chanc't a Bee did flie that way, 

(After a dew, or dew-like shower) 

To tipple freely in a flower. 

For some rich flower, he took the lip 5 

Oi Julia, and began to sip ; 

But when he felt he suckt from thence 

Hony, and in the quintessence : 

He drank so much he scarce co'd stir ; 

So Julia took the Pilferer. lo 

And thus surpriz'd (as Filchers use) 

He thus began himselfe t'excuse : 

Sweet Lady-Flower, I never brought 

Hither the least one theeving thought : 

But taking those rare lips of yours 15 

For some fresh, fragrant, luscious flowers : 

I thought I might there take a taste. 

Where so much sirrop ran at waste. 

Besides, know this, I never sting 

The flower that gives me nourishing : so 

But with a kisse, or thanks, doe pay 

For Honie, that I beare away. 

This said, he laid his little scrip 

Of hony, 'fore her Ladiship : 

And told her, (as some tears did fall) 35 

That, that he took, and that was all. 

At which she smil'd ; and bade him goe 

And take his bag ; but thus much know, 

When next he came a pilfring so, 

He sho'd from her full lips derive, 30 

Hony enough to fill his hive. 



7 2 Hesperides. 

An Ode to Master Endymion Porter, 
upon his Brothers death. 

Not all thy flushing Sunnes are set, 
Herrick, as yet : 
Nor doth this far-drawn Hemisphere 
Frown, and look sullen ev'ry where. 
Uaies may conclude in nights ; and Suns may rest, 5 

As dead, within the West ; 
Yet the next Morne, re-guild the fragrant East. 

Alas for me ! that I have lost 

E'en all almost : 
Sunk is my sight ; set is my Sun ; 10 

And all the loome of life undone : 
The staffe, the Elme, the prop, the shelt'ring wall 

Whereon my Vine did crawle, 
Now, now, blowne downe ; needs must the old stock fall. 

Yet, Porter, while thou keep'st alive, 15 

In death I thrive : 
And like a Phenix re-aspire 
From out my Narde, and Fun'rall fire : 
And as I prune my feather'd youth, so I 

Doe mar'l how I co'd die, ao 

When I had Thee, my chiefe Preserver, by. 

I'm up, I'm up, and blesse that hand, 

Which makes me stand 
Now as I doe ; and but for thee, 

I must confesse, I co'd not be. 25 

The debt is paid : for he who doth resigne 

Thanks to the gen'rous Vine ; 
Invites fresh Grapes to fill his Presse with Wine. 



'To his dying Brother, Master William Herrick. 

Life of my life, take not so soone thy flight, 
But stay the time till we have bade Good night. 
Thou hast both Wind and Tide with thee ; Thy way 
As soone dispatcht is by the Night, as Day. 



Hesperides. 7 3 

Let us not then so rudely henceforth goe S 

Till we have wept, kist, sigh't, shook hands, or so. 

There's paine in parting ; and a kind of hell, 

When once true-lovers take their last Fare-well. 

What ? shall we two our endlesse leaves take here 

Without a sad looke, or a solemne teare? lo 

He knowes not Love, that hath not this truth proved, 

Love is most loth to leave the thing beloved. 

Pay we our Vowes, and goe ; yet when we part, 

Then, even then, I will bequeath my heart 

Into thy loving hands : For He keep none 15 

To warme my Breast, when thou my Pulse art gone. 

No, here He last, and walk (a harmless shade) 

About this Urne, wherein thy Dust is laid, 

To guard it so, as nothing here shall be 

Heavy, to hurt those sacred seeds of thee, 30 



The Olive Branch. 

Sadly I walk't within the field. 

To see what comfort it wo'd yeeld : 

And as I went my private way. 

An Olive-branch before me lay : 

And seeing it, I made a stay. 

And took it up, and view'd it ; then 

Kissing the Omen, said Amen : 

Be, be it so, and let this be 

A Divination unto me : 

That in short time my woes shall cease ; 

And Love shall crown my End with Peace 



To Cherry-blossomes. 

Ye may simper, blush, and smile. 
And perfume the aire a while : 
But (sweet things) ye must be gone ; 
Fruit, ye know, is comming on : 
Then, Ah ! Then, where is your grace. 
When as Cherries come in place ? 



74 Hesperides. 

How Liiltes came white. 

White though ye be ; yet, Lillies, know, 
From the first ye were not so : 

But He tell ye 

What befell ye ; 
Cupid and his Mother lay 
In a Cloud ; while both did play. 
He with his pretty finger prest 
The ruble niplet of her breast ; 
Out of the which, the creame of light, 

Like to a Dew, 

Fell downe on you. 

And made ye white. 



To Pansies. 

Ahj cruell Love ! must I endure 
Thy many scorns, and find no cure ? 
Say, are thy medicines made to be 
Helps to all others, but to me ? 
He leave thee, and to Pansies come ; 
Comforts you'l afford me some : 
You can ease my heart, and doe 
What Love co'd ne'r be brought unto. 



On Gelli-flowen begotten. 

What was't that fell but now 
From that warme kisse of ours ? 

Look, look, by Love I vow 
They were two Gelli-flowers. 

Let's kisse, and kisse agen ; 

For if so be our closes 
Make Gelli-flowers, then 

I'm sure they'l fashion Roses. 



Hesperides. 7 5 

The Lilly in a Christal, 

You have beheld a smiling Rose 

When Virgins hands have drawn 

O'r it a Cobweb-Lawne : 
And here, you see, this Lilly shows, 

Tomb'd in a Christal stone, S 

More faire in this transparent case, 

Then when it grew alone ; 

And nad buc single grace. 

You see how Creame but naked is ; 

Nor daunces in the eye lo 

Without a Strawberrie : 
Or some fine tincture, like to this. 

Which draws the sight thereto, 
More by that wantoning with it ; 

Then when the paler hieu ig 

No mixture did admit. 

You see how Amber through the streams 

More gently stroaks the sight, 

With some conceal'd delight; 
Then when he darts his radiant beams 20 

Into the boundlesse aire : 
Where either too much light his worth 

Doth all at once impaire, 

Or set it little forth. 

Put Purple Grapes, or Cherries in- 35 

To Glasse, and they will send 

More beauty to commend 
Them, from that cleane and subtile skin, 

Then if they naked stood, 
And had no other pride at all, 3° 

But their own flesh and blood, 

And tinctures naturall. 

Thus Lillie, Rose, Grape, Cherry, Creame, 

And Straw-berry do stir 

More love, when they transfer 35 

A weak, a soft, a broken beame ; 

36 soft] foft 164S : misp-intfor foft (soft) : corr. in orig. Errata 



-] 6 Hesperides. 



Then if they sho'd discover 
At full their proper excellence ; 

Without some Scean cast over, 

To juggle with the sense. 40 

Thus let this Christald Lillie be 

A Rule, how far to teach. 

Your nakednesse must reach : 
And that, no further, then we see 

Those glaring colours laid 45 

By Arts wise hand, but to this end 

They sho'd obey a shade ; 

Lest they too far extend. 

So though y'are white as Swan, or Snow, 

And have the power to move 50 

A world of men to love : 
Yet, when your Lawns & Silks shal flow ; 

And that white cloud divide 
Into a doubtful Twi-light ; then. 

Then will your hidden Pride 65 

Raise greater fires in men. 



To his Booke. 

Like to a Bride, come forth my Book, at last, 

With all thy ricKest jewels over-cast : 

Say, if there be 'mongst many jems here ; one 

Deservelesse of the name of Paragon : 

Blush not at all for that ; since we have set 

Some Pearls on Queens, that have been counterfet. 



Upon some women. 

Thou who wilt not love, doe this ; 
Learne of me what Woman is. 
Something made of thred and thrumme ; 
A meere Botch of all and some. 
Pieces, patches, ropes of haire ; 
In-laid Garbage ev'ry where. 



Hesperides. y y 



Out-side silk, and out-side Lawne ; 
Sceanes to cheat us neatly drawne. 
False in legs, and false in thighes ; 
False in breast, teeth, haire, and eyes : 
False in head, and false enough ; 
Onely true in shreds and stuffe. 



Supreme fortune falls soonest. 

While leanest Beasts in Pastures feed, 
The fattest Oxe the first must bleed. 



The Welcome to Sack, 

So soft streams meet, so springs with gladder smiles 

Meet after long divorcement by the lies : 

When Love (the child of Ukenesse) urgeth on 

Their Christal natures to an union. 

So meet stolne kisses, when the Moonie nights 5 

Call forth fierce Lovers to their wisht Delights : 

So Kings 6^ Queens meet, when Desire convinces 

All thoughts, but such as aime at getting Princes, 

As I meet thee. Soule of my life, and fame ! 

Eternall Lamp of Love ! whose radiant flame 10 

Out-glares the Heav'ns * Osiris; and thy gleams * The Sun. 

Out-shine the splendour of his mid-day beams. 

Welcome, O welcome my illustrious Spouse ; 

Welcome as are the ends unto my Vowes : 

I ! far more welcome then the happy soile, 15 

The Sea-scourg'd Merchant, after all his toile, 

Salutes with tears of joy ; when fires betray 

The smoakie chimneys of his Ithaca. 

Where hast thou been so long from my embraces, 

Poore pittyed Exile ? Tell me, did thy Graces 30 

Flie discontented hence, and for a time 

Did rather choose to blesse another clime ? 

Or went'st thou to this end, the more to move me, 

By thy short absence, to desire and love thee ? 

Why frowns my Sweet ? Why won't my Saint confer 25 

Favours on me, her fierce Idolater ? 



78 



Hesperides. 



Why are Those Looks, Those Looks the which have been 

Time-past so fragrant, sickly now drawn in 

Like a dull Twi-light ? Tell me ; and the fault 

He expiate with Sulphur, Haire, and Salt : 30 

And with the Christal humour of the spring, 

Purge hence the guilt, and kill this quarrelling. 

Wo't thou not smile, or tell me what's amisse ? 

Have I been cold to hug thee, too remisse. 

Too temp'rate in embracing ? Tell me, ha's desire 35 

To thee-ward dy'd i'th'embers, and no fire 

Left in this rak't-up Ash-heap, as a mark 

To testifie the glowing of a spark ? 

Have I divorc't thee onely to combine 

In hot Adult'ry with another Wine ? 

True, I confesse I left thee, and appeale 

'Twas done by me, more to confirme my zeale. 

And double my affection on thee ; as doe those, 

Whose love growes more enflam'd, by being Foes. 

But to forsake thee ever, co'd there be 

A thought of such like possibilitie ? 

When thou- thy selfe dar'st say, thy lies shall lack 

Grapes, before Herrick leaves Canarie Sack. 

Thou mak'st me ayrie, active to be born. 

Like Iphydus, upon the tops of Corn. 

Thou mak'st me nimble, as the winged bowers, 

To dance and caper on the heads of flowers. 

And ride the Sun-beams. Can there be a thing 

Under the heavenly *Isis, that can bring 

More love unto my life, or can present 

My Genius with a fuller blandishment ? 

Illustrious Idoll ! co'd th' ^Egyptians seek 

Help from the Garlick, Onyon, and the Leek, 

And pay no vowes to thee ? who wast their best 

God, and far more transcendent then the rest ? 

Had Cassius, that weak Water-drinker, known 

Thee in thy Vine, or had but tasted one 

Small Chalice of thy frantick liquor ; He 

As the wise Cato had approv'd of thee. 

Had not *Joves son, that brave Tyrinthian Swain, 

(Invited to the Thesbian banquet) ta'ne 

Full goblets of thy gen'rous blood ; his spright 

Ne'r had kept heat for fifty Maids that night. 



40 



45 



50 



The Moon. 

55 



60 



Hercules, 
66 



Hesperides. 7 9 

Come, come and kisse me ; Love and lust commends 

Thee, and thy beauties ; kisse, we will be friends, 70 

Too strong for Fate to break us : Look upon 

Me, with that full pride of complexion, 

As Queenes, meet Queenes; or come thou unto me. 

As Cleopatra came to Anthonie ; 

When her high carriage did at once present 75 

To the Triumvir, Love and Wonderment. 

Swell up my nerves with spirit ; let my blood 

Run through my veines, like to a hasty flood. 

Fill each part full of fire, active to doe 

What thy commanding soule shall put it to. 80 

And till I turne Apostate to thy love, 

Which here I vow to serve, doe not remove 

Thy Fiers from me ; but Apollo's curse 

Blast these-like actions, or a thing that's worse ; 

When these Circumstants shall but live to see 85 

The time that I prevaricate from thee. 

Call me The sonne of Beere, and then confine 

Me to the Tap, the Tost, the Turfe ; Let Wine 

Ne'r shine upon me ; May my Numbers all 

Run to a sudden Death, and Funerall. 90 

And last, when thee (deare Spouse) I disavow, 

Ne'r may Prophetique Daphne crown my Brow. 



Impossibilities to his friend. 

My faithful friend, if you can see 
The Fruit to grow up, or the Tree : 
If you can see the colour come 
Into the blushing Peare, or Plum : 
If you can see the water grow 
To cakes of Ice, or flakes of Snow : 
If you can see, that drop of raine 
Lost in the wild sea, once againe : 
If you can see, how Dreams do creep 
Into the Brain by easie sleep : 
Then there is hope that you may see 
Her love me once, who now hates me. 



8 o Hesperides, 



To live merrily y and to trust to Good Versa. 

Now is the time for mirth, 

Nor cheek, or tongue be dumbe : 
For with the flowrie earth. 

The golden pomp is come. 

The golden Pomp is come ; 5 

For now each tree do's weare 
(Made of her Pap and Gum) 

Rich beads of Amber here. 

Now raignes the Rose, and now 

Th' Arabian Dew besmears lo 

My uncontrolled brow, 

And my retorted haires. 

Homer, this Health to thee, 

In Sack of such a kind. 
That it wo'd make thee see, 15 

Though thou wert ne'r so blind. 

Next, Virgil, He call forth, 

To pledge this second Health 
In Wine, whose each cup's worth 

An Indian Common-wealth. 30 

A Goblet next He drink 

To Ovid; and suppose, 
Made he the pledge, he'd think 

The world had all one Nose. 

Then this immensive cup aj 

Of Aromatike wine, 
Catullus, I quaffe up 

To that Terce Muse of thine 

To live merrily, &c. 3 the flowrie] flowrie 164S : corr. in orig. Errata 



Mesperides. 8 1 

Wild I am now with heat ; 

O Bacchus I coole thy Raies ! 30 

Or frantick I shall eate 

Thy Thyrse, and bite the Bayes. 

Round, round, the roof do's run ; 

And being ravisht thus. 
Come, I will drink a Tun 35 

To my Fropertius. 

Now, to Tubulins, next, 

This flood I drink to thee : 
But stay; I see a Text, 

That this presents to me. 40 

Behold, Tibullus lies 

Here burnt, whose smal return 
Of ashes, scarce suffice 

To fill a little Urne. 

Trust to good Verses then ; 4S 

They onely will aspire. 
When Pyramids, as men, 

Are lost, i'th'funerall fire. 

And when all Bodies meet 

In Lethe to be drown'd ; 50 

Then onely Numbers sweet. 

With endless life are crown'd. 



Faire dayes : or, Dawnes deceitfull. 

Faire was the Dawne ; and but e'ne now the Skies 

Shew'd like to Creame, enspir'd with Strawberries : 

But on a sudden, all was chang'd and gone 

That smil'd in that first-sweet complexion. 

Then Thunder-claps and Lightning did conspire 5 

To teare the world, or set it all on fire. 

What trust to things below, when as we see. 

As Men^, the Heavens have their Hypocrisie? 

Faire dayes: &c. 7 things below,] things, below 1648 {an evident mis- 
punctuation) 

G 



8 2 Hesperides. 



hips Tonguelesse. 

For my part, I never care 

For those lips, that tongue-ty'd are r 

Tell-tales I wo'd have them be 

Of my Mistresse, and of me. 

Let them prattle how that I 

Sometimes freeze, and sometimes frie ; 

Let them tell how she doth move 

Fore- or backward in her love : 

Let them speak by gentle tones. 

One and th'others passions : 

How we watch, and seldome sleep ; 

How by Willowes we doe weep : 

How by stealth we meet, and then 

Kisse, and sigh, so part agen. 

This the lips we will permit 

For to tell, not publish it. 



To the Fever, not to trouble Julia. 

Th'ast dar'd too farre ; but Furie now forbeare 

To give the least disturbance to her haire : 

But lease presume to lay a Plait upon 

Her skins most smooth, and cleare expansion. 

'Tis like a Lawnie-Firmament as yet i 

Quite dispossest of either fray, or fret. 

Come thou not neere that P'ilmne so finely spred, 

Where no one piece is yet unlevelled. 

This if thou dost, woe to thee Furie, woe, 

He send such Frost, such Haile, such Sleet, and Snow, i 

Such Flesh-quakes, Palsies, and such fears as shall 

Dead thee to th' most, if not destroy thee all. 

And thou a thousand thousand times shalt be 

More shak't thy selfe, then she is scorch't by thee. 

To the Fever, &c. ii Flesh-quakes,] fears, quakes, Hazlitt, Grosart, &'c, 
fears] Heates 1648 : corr. in orig. Errata 



Hesperides. 8 3 



To Violets. 

Welcome Maids of Honour, 

You doe bring 

In the Spring ; 
And wait upon her. 

She has Virgins many, 5 

Fresh and faire; 

Yet you are 
More sweet then any. 

. Y'are the Maiden Posies, 

And so grac't, lo 

To be plac't, 
'Fore Damask Roses. 

. Yet though thus respected. 
By and by 

Ye doe lie, iS 

Poore Girles, neglected. 



To Carnations. A Song. 

1. Stay while ye will, or goe ; 

And leave no scent behind ye : 
Yet trust me, I shall know 

The place, where I may find ye. 

2. Within my Lucia's cheek, 

(Whose Livery ye weare) 
Play ye at Hide or Seek, 
I'm sure to find ye there. 



84 Hesperides. 

To the Virgins, to make much of Time. 

1. Gather ye Rose-buds while ye may, 

Old Time is still a flying : 
And this same flower that smiles to day, 
To morrow will be dying. 

2. The glorious Lamp of Heaven, the Sun, 5 

The higher he's a getting ; 
The sooner will his Race be run, 
And neerer he's to Setting. 

3. That Age is best, which is the first. 

When Youth and Blood are warmer ; 10 

But being spent, the worse, and worst 
Times, still succeed the former. 

4. Then be not coy, but use your time ; 

And while ye may, goe marry : 
For having lost but once your prime, 1 5 

You may for ever tarry. 



Safety to look to ones selfe. 

For my neighbour He not know, 
Whether high he builds or no : 
Onely this He look upon, 
Firm be my foundation. 
Sound, or unsound, let it be ; 
'Tis the lot ordain'd for me. 
He who to the ground do's fall, 
Has not whence to sink at all. 



To his Friend^ on the untuneable Times. 

Play I co'd once ; but (gentle friend) you see 
My Harp hung up, here on the Willow tree. 
Sing I co'd once ; and bravely too enspire 
(With luscious Numbers) my melodious Lyre. 
Draw I co'd once (although not stocks or stones, 
Amphion-\Tke) men made of flesh and bones, 



Hesperides. 8 5 



Whether I wo'd ; but (ah !) I know not how, 

I feele in me, this transmutation now. 

Griefe, (my deare friend) has first my Harp unstrung ; 

Wither'd my hand, and palsie-struck my tongue. 



His Poetrie his Pillar. 

1. Onely a little more 

I have to write, 
Then He give o're, 
And bid the world Good-night. 

2. 'Tis but a flying minute, S 

That I must stay, 
Or linger in it ; 
And then I must away. 

3. O time that cut'st down all ! 

And scarce leav'st here lo 

Memoriall 
Of any men that were. 

4. How many lye forgot 

In Vaults beneath ? 

And piece-meale rot 15 

Without a fame in death ? 

5. Behold this living stone, 

I reare for me, 
Ne'r to be thrown 
Downe, envious Time by thee. ao 

6. Pillars let some set up, 

(If so they please) 
Here is my hope, 
And my Pyramides. 



Safety on the Shore. 

What though the sea be calme ? Trust to the shore : 
Ships have been drown'd, where late they danc't before. 



8 6 Hesperides. 

A Pastoral! upon the birth of Prince Charles, 

Presented to the King, and Set by 
Mr. Nic: Lariiere. 

The Speakers, Mirtillo, Amintas, and Amarillis. 

Amin. Good day, Mirtillo. Mirt. And to you no lesse : 

And all faire Signs lead on our Shepardesse. 

Amar. With all white luck to you. Mirt. But say, What news 

Stirs in our Sheep-walk ? Amin. None, save that my Ewes, 

My Weathers, Lambes, and wanton Kids are well, 5 

Smooth, faire, and fat, none better I can tell : 

Or that this day Menalchas keeps a feast 

For his Sheep-shearers. Mir. True, these are the least. 

But dear Amintas, and sweet Amarillis, 

Rest but a while here, by this bank of Lillies, lo 

And lend a gentle eare to one report 

The Country has. Amint. From whence? Amar. From whence? 

Mir. The Court. 
Three dayes before the shutting in of May, 
(With whitest Wool be ever crown'd that day !) 
To all our joy, a sweet-fac't child was borne, 15 

More tender then the childhood of the Morne. 
Chor. Pan pipe to him, and bleats of lambs and sheep, 
Let Lullaby the pretty Prince asleep ! 
Mirt. And that his birth she'd be more singular. 
At Noone of Day, was seene a silver Star, so 

Bright as the Wise-men's Torch, which guided them 
To Gods sweet Babe, when borne at Bethlehem ; 
While Golden Angels (some have told to me) 
Sung out his Birth with Heav'nly Minstralsie. 
Amint. O rare ! But is't a trespasse if we three 25 

Sho'd wend along his Baby-ship to see ? 
Mir. Not so, not so. Chor. But if it chance to prove 
At most a fault, 'tis but a fault of love. 
Amar. But deare Mirtillo, I have heard it told, 
Those learned men brought Incense, Myrrhe, and Gold, 30 

From Countries far, with Store of Spices, (sweet) 
And laid them downe for Offrings at his feet. 
Mirt. 'Tis true indeed ; and each of us will bring 
Unto our smiling, and our blooming King, 
A neat, though not so great an Offering. 35 



Hesperides. 8 7 

Amar. A Garland for my Gift shall be 

Of flowers, ne'r suckt by th' theeving Bee : 

And all most sweet ; yet all lesse sweet then he. 

Amint. And I will beare along with you 

Leaves dropping downe the honyed dew, 40 

With oaten pipes, as sweet, as new. 

Mirt. And I a Sheep-hook will bestow. 

To have his little King-ship know, 

As he is Prince, he's Shepherd too. 

Chor. Come let's away, and quickly let's be drest, 45 

And quickly give. The swiftest Grace is best. 

And when before him we have laid our treasures, 

We'll blesse the Babe, Then back to Countrie pleasures. 



To the Lark. 

Good speed, for I this day 
Betimes my Mattens say : 

Because I doe 

Begin to wooe : 

Sweet singing Lark, 5 

Be thou the Clark, 

And know thy when 

To say. Amen. 

And if I prove 

Blest in my love ; 10 

Then thou shalt be 

High-Priest to me. 

At my returne, 

To Incense bume ; 
And so to solemnize 15 

Love's, and my Sacrifice. 



The Bubble. A Song. 

To my revenge, and to her desp'rate feares, 
Flie thou made Bubble of my sighs, and tears. 
In the wild aire, when thou hast rowl'd about, 
And (like a blasting Planet) found her out ; 
Stoop, mount, passe by to take her eye, then glare 
Like to a dreadfuU Comet in the Aire ; 



8 8 Hesperides. 

Next, when thou dost perceive her fixed sight, 

For thy revenge to be most opposite ; 

Then like a Globe, or Ball of Wild-fire, flie, 

And break thy self in shivers on her eye. jo 

A Meditation for his Mistresse. 

I. You are a Tulip seen to day, 
But (Dearest) of so short a stay ; 
That where you grew, scarce man can say. 

2. You are a \ovAy July-flower, 

Yet one rude wind, or ruffling shower, 5 

Will force you hence, (and in an houre.) 

3. You are a sparkling Rose i'th'bud. 
Yet lost, ere that chast flesh and blood 
Can shew where you or grew, or stood. 

4. You are a full-spread faire-set Vine, 10 
And can with Tendrills love intwine. 

Yet dry'd, ere you distill your Wine. 

5. You are like Balme inclosed (well) 
In Amber, or some Chrystall shell, 

Yet lost ere you transfuse your smell. 15 

6. You are a dainty Violet, 

Yet wither'd, ere you can be set 
Within the Virgins Coronet. 

7. You are the Queen all flowers among. 

But die you must (faire Maid) ere long, ao 

As He, the maker of this Song. 

ne bleeding hand : or, The sprig of 
Eglantine given to a maid. 

From this bleeding hand of mine, 

Take this sprig of Eglantine. 

Which (though sweet unto your smell) 

Yet the fretfull bryar will tell. 

He who plucks the sweets shall prove 5 

Many thorns to be in Love. 



Hesperides. 8 g 

Lyrickfor Legacies. 

Gold I've none, for use or show, 

Neither Silver to bestow 

At my death ; but thus much know, 

That each Lyrick here shall be 

Of my love a Legacie, 5 

Left to all posterity. 

Gentle friends, then doe but please, 

To accept such coynes as these ; 

As my last Remembrances. 

A Dirge upon the Death of the Right Valiant 
Lord, Bernard Stuart. 

1. Hence, hence, profane ; soft silence let us have; 
While we this Trentall sing about thy Grave. 

2. Had Wolves or Tigers seen but thee, 
They wo'd have shew'd civility ; 

And in compassion of thy yeeres, 5 

Washt those thy purple wounds with tears. 
But since th'art slaine ; and in thy fall, 
The drooping Kingdome suffers all. 

Chor. This we will doe ; we'll daily come 

And offer Tears upon thy Tomb : lo 

And if that they will not suffice. 
Thou shalt have soules for sacrifice. 

Sleepe in thy peace, while we with spice perfume thee, 
And Cedar wash thee, that no times consume thee. 

3. Live, live thou dost, and shalt ; for why ? 15 
Soules doe not with ilieir bodies die : 

Ignoble off-springs, they may fall 

Into the flames of Funerall : 

When as the chosen seed shall spring 

Fresh, and for ever flourishing. 30 

CAo. And times to come shall, weeping, read thy glory, 
Lesse in these Marble stones, then in thy story. 



9© Hesperides. 



To Perenna, a Mistresse. 

Deare Perenna, prethee come, 
And with Smallage dresse my 7'omb ; 
Adde a Cypresse-spng thereto, 
With a teare ; and so Adieu. 



The Fairie Temple : or, Oberons Chappell. 

Dedicated to Mr. John Merrifield, 

Counsellor at Law. 

Rare Temples thou hast seen, I know, 
And rich for in and outward show : 
Survey this Chappell, built, alone. 
Without or Lime, or Wood, or Stone : 
Then say, if one th'ast seene more fine 
Then this, the Fairies once, now Thine. 



The Temple. 

A way enchac't with glasse & beads 

There is, that to the Chappel leads : 

Whose structure (for his holy rest) 

Is here the Halcion's curious nest : 

Into the which who looks shall see 5 

His Temple of Idolatry : 

Where he of God-heads has such store, 

As Rome's Pantheon had not more. 

His house of Rimmon, this he calls, 

Girt with small bones, instead of walls. ic 

First, in a Neech, more black than jet. 

His Idol-Cricket there is set : 

Then in a Polisht Ovall by 

There stands his Idol-Beetle-flie : 

Next in an Arch, akin to this, 15 

His Idol-Canker seated is : 

Then in a Round, is plac't by these, 

His golden god, Cantharides. 



Hesperides. g i 



So that where ere ye look, ye see, 

No CapitoU, no Cornish free, 20 

Or Freeze, from this fine Fripperie. 

Now this the Fairies wo'd have known, 

Theirs is a mixt Religion. 

And some have heard the Elves it call 

Part Pagan, part Papisticall. 35 

If unto me all Tongues were granted, 

I co'd not speak the Saints here painted. 

Saint Tit, Saint Mt, Saint Is, Saint Itis, 

Who 'gainst Mabs-state plac't here right is. 

Saint Will oUh' Wispe (of no great bignes) .',0 

But alias call'd here Fatuus ignis. 

Saint Frip, Saint Trip, Saint Fill, S. Fillie, 

Neither those other-Saint-ships will I 

Here goe about for to recite 

Their number (almost) infinite, 35 

Which one by one here set downe are 

In this most curious Calendar. 

First, at the entrance of the gate, 

A little-Puppet-Priest doth wait, 

Who squeaks to all the commers there, 40 

Favour your tongues, who enter here. 

Pure hafids bring hither, without staine. 

A second pules, Hence, hence, profane. 

Hard by, i'th'shell of halfe a nut 

The Holy-water there is put : 45 

A little brush of Squirrils haires, 

(Compos'd of odde, not even paires) 

Stands in the Platter, or close by. 

To purge the Fairie Family. 

Neere to the Altar stands the Priest, 50 

There ofPring up the Holy -Grist : 

Ducking in Mood, and perfect Tense, 

With (much-good-do't him) reverence. 

The Altar is not here foure-square, 

Nor in a forme Triangular ; 55 

Nor made of glasse, or wood, or stone, 

But of a little Transverce bone ; 

Which boyes, and Bruckel'd children call 

(Playing for Points and Pins) Cockall. 

Whose Linnen-Drapery is a. thin 60 



92 Hesperides, 



Subtile and ductile Codlin's skin ; 

Which o're the board is smoothly spred. 

With little Seale-work Damasked. 

The Fringe that circumbinds it too. 

Is Spangle-work of trembling dew, 65 

Which, gently gleaming, makes a show, 

Like Frost-work glitt'ring on the Snow. 

Upon this fetuous board doth stand 

Something for Sfiew-bread, and at hand 

(Just in the middle of the Altar) 70 

Upon an end, the Fairie-Psalter, 

Grac't with the Trout-flies curious wings. 

Which serve for watched Ribbanings. 

Now, we must know, the Elves are led 

Right by the Rubrick, which they read. 75 

And if Report of them be true, 

They have their Text for what they doe ; 

I, and their Book of Canons too. 

And, as Sir Thomas Parson tells, 

They have their Book of Articles : 80 

And if that Fairie Knight not lies, 

They have their Book of Homilies : 

And other Scriptures, that designe 

A short, but righteous discipline. 

The Bason stands the board upon 85 

To take the Free-Oblation : 

A little Pin-dust ; which they hold 

More precious, then we prize our gold : 

Which charity they give to many 

Poore of the Parish, (if there's any) 90 

Upon the ends of these neat Railes 

(Hatcht, with the Silver-light of snails) 

The Elves, in formall manner, fix 

Two pure, and holy Candlesticks : 

In either which a small tall bent 95 

Burns for the Altars ornament. 

For sanctity, they have, to these, 

Their curious Copes and Surplices 

Of cleanest Cobweb^ hanging by 

In their Religions J'esterie. loo 

They have their Ash-pans, & their Brooms 

To purge the Chappel and the rooms : 



Hesperides. 9 3 



Their many mumbling Masse-priests here, 

And many a dapper Chorister. 

There ush'ring Vergers, here Ukewise, 105 

Their Canons, and their Chaunteries : 

Of Cloy ster- Monks they have enow, 

I, and their Abby-Lubbers too : 

And if their Legend doe not lye, 

They much affect the Papacie : "o 

And since the last is dead, there's hope, 

Elve Boniface shall next be Pope. 

They have their Cups and Chalices ; 

Their Pardons and Indulgences : 

Their Beads of Nits, Bels, Books, & Wax 113 

Candles (forsooth) and other knacks : 

Their Holy Oyle, their Fasting- Spittle ; 

Their sacred Salt here, (not a little.) 

Dry chips, old skooes, rags, grease, & bones ; 

Beside their Fumigations, lao 

To drive the Devill from the Cod-piece 

Of the Fryar, (of work an odde-piece.) 

Many a trifle too, and trinket, 

And for what use, scarce man wo'd think it. 

Next, then, upon the Chanters side 135 

An Apples-core is hung up dry'd, 

With ratling Kirnils, which is rung 

To call to Morn, and Even-Song. 

The Saint, to which the most he prayes 

And offers Incense Nights and dayes, 130 

The Lady of the Lobster is, 

Whose foot-pace he doth stroak and kisse 

And, humbly, chives of Saffron brings. 

For his most cheerfuU offerings. 

When, after these, h'as paid his vows, 135 

He lowly to the Altar bows : 

And then he dons the Silk-worms shed, 

(Like a Turks Turbant on his head) 

And reverently departeth thence, 

Hid in a cloud of Frankincense : 140 

And by the glow-worms light wel guided, 

Goes to the Feast that's now provided. 



94 Hesperides. 



To Misiresse Katherine Bradshaw, the lovely, 
that crowned him with Laurel. 

My Muse in Meads has spent her many houres, 

Sitting, and sorting severall sorts of flowers, 

To make for others garlands ; and to set 

On many a head here, many a Coronet : 

But, amongst All encircled here, not one 

Gave her a day of Coronation ; 

Till you (sweet Mistresse) came and enterwove 

A Laurel for her, (ever young as love) 

You first of all crown'd her ; she must of due. 

Render for that, a crowne of life to you. 



The Plaudite, or end of life. 

If after rude and boystrous seas. 
My wearyed Pinnace here finds ease : 
If so it be I've gain'd the shore 
With safety of a faithful Ore : 
If having run my Barque on ground, 
Ye see the aged Vessell crown'd : 
What's to be done ? but on the Sands 
Ye dance, and sing, and now clap hands. 
The first Act's doubtfull, (but we say) 
It is the last commends the Play. 



To the most vertuous Mistresse Pot, 
who many times entertained him. 

When I through all my many Poems look, 
And see your selfe to beautifie my Book ; 
Me thinks that onely lustre doth appeare 
A Light ful-fiUing all the Region here. 
Guild still with flames this Firmament, and be 
A Lamp Eternall to my Poetrie. 
Which if it now, or shall hereafter shine, 
'Twas by your splendour (Lady) not by mine. 
The Oile was yours ; and that I owe for yet : 
He payes the halfe, who dds confesse tlie Debt. 



Hespertdes. 9 5 



To MusiquBj to becalme his Fever. 

1. Charm me asleep, and melt me so 

With thy Delicious Numbers ; 
That being ravisht, hence I goe 
Away in easie slumbers. 

Ease my sick head, 5 

And make my bed, 
Thou Power that canst sever 
From me this ill : 
And quickly still : 

Though thou not kill lo 

My Fever. 

2. Thou sweetly canst convert the same 

From a consuming fire, 
Into a gentle-licking flame, 

And make it thus expire. 15 

Then make me weep 
My paines asleep ; 
And give me such reposes. 
That I, poore I, 

May think, thereby, ao 

I live and die 

'Mongst Roses. 



Fall on me like a silent dew. 

Or like those Maiden showrs, 
Which, by the peepe of day, doe strew 35 

A Baptime ore the flowers. 
Melt, melt my paines. 
With thy soft straines ; 
That having ease me given, 

AVith full delight, 30 

1 leave this light ; 
And take my flight 
For Heaven, 



96 Hesperides. 



Upon a Gentlewoman with a sweet Voice. 

So long you did not sing, or touch your Lute, 
We knew 'twas Flesh and Blood, that there sate mute. 
But when your Playing, and your Voice came in, 
'Twas no more you then, but a Cherubin. 



Upon Cupid. 

As lately I a Garland bound, 
'Mongst Roses, I there Cupid found : 
I took him, put him in my cup, 
And drunk with Wine, I drank him up. 
Hence then it is, that my poore brest 
Co'd never since find any rest. 



Upon Julia's breasts. 

Display thy breasts, my Julia, there let me 
Behold that circummortall purity : 
Betweene whose glories, there my lips He lay, 
Ravisht, in that faire Via Lactea. 



Best to be merry. 

Fooles are they, who never know 

How the times away doe goe : 

But for us, who wisely see 

Where the bounds of black Death be : 

Let's live merrily, and thus 

Gratifie the Genius. 



'The Changes to Corinna. 

Be not proud, but now encline 
Your soft eare to Discipline. 
You have changes in your life. 
Sometimes peace, and sometimes strife : 



Hesperides. 97 

You have ebbes of face and flowes, s 

As your health or comes, or goes ; 

You have hopes, and doubts, and feares 

Numberlesse, as are your haires. 

You have Pulses that doe beat 

High, and passions lesse of heat. lo 

You are young, but must be old. 

And, to these, ye must be told. 

Time, ere long, will come and plow 

Loathed Furrowes in your brow : 

And the dimnesse of your eye '^5 

Will no other thing imply, 

But you must die 

As well as I. 



Neglect. 

Art quickens Nature; Care will make a face: 
Neglected beauty perisheth apace. 



Upon himselfe. 

Mop-ey'd I am, as some have said. 
Because I've liv'd so long a maid : 
But grant that I she'd wedded be, 
Sho'd I a jot the better see ? 
No, I sho'd think, that Marriage might. 
Rather then mend, put out the light. 



Upon a Physitian. 

Thou cam'st to cure me (Doctor) of my cold. 
And caught'st thy selfe the more by twenty fold : 
Prethee goe home ; and for thy credit be 
Fir^t cur'd thy selfe ; then come and cure me. 



BEIIRICI' 



98 Hesperides. 

To the Rose. Song. 

1. Goe happy Rose, and enterwove 
With other Flowers, bind my Love. 

Tell her too, she must not be, 

Longer flowing, longer free. 

That so oft has fetter'd me. 5 

2. Say (if she's fretfull) I have bands 

Of Pearle, and Gold, to bind her hands : 
Tell her, if she struggle still, 
I have Mirtle rods, (at will) 
For to tame, though not to kill. 10 

3. Take thou my blessing, thus, and goe, 
And tell her this, but doe not so, 

Lest a handsome anger flye. 

Like a Lightning, from her eye, 

And burn thee 'up, as well as I. 15 



To his Booke. 

Thou art a plant sprung up to wither never. 
But like a Laurell, to grow green for ever. 



Upon a painted Gentlewoman. 

Men say y'are faire ; and faire ye are, 'tis true ; 
But (Hark !) we praise the Painter now, not you. 



Draw Gloves. 

At Draw-Gloves we'l play, 

And prethee, let's lay 
A wager, and let it be this ; 

Who first to the Summe 

Of twenty shall come. 
Shall have for his winning a kisse. 



Hesperides. 9 9 

To Mustek, to becalme a sweet-sick-youth. 

Charms, that call down the moon from out her sphere, 

On this sick youth work your enchantments here : 

Bind up his senses with your numbers, so, 

As to entrance his paine, or cure his woe. 

Fall gently, gently, and a while him keep 5 

Lost in the civill Wildernesse of sleep : 

That done, then let him, dispossest of paine, 

Like to a slumbring Bride, awake againe. 

To the High and Noble Prince, GEORGE, 

Duke, Marquesse, and Eark of 

Buckingham. 

Never my Book's perfection did appeare, 

Til I had got the name of Villars here. 

Now 'lis so full, that when therein I look, 

I see a Cloud of Glory fills my Book. 

Here stand it stil to dignifie our Muse, 5 

Your sober Hand-maid ; who doth wisely chuse, 

Your Name to be a Laureat Wreathe to Hir, 

Who doth both love and feare you Honour'd Sir. 

His Recantation. 

Love, I recant. 
And pardon crave. 
That lately I offended. 
But 'twas, 

Alas, 6 

To make a brave. 
But no disdaine intended. 

No more He vaunt. 
For now I see. 
Thou onely hast the power, lo 

To find. 
And bind 
A heart that's free. 
And slave it in an houre. 



1 o o Hesperides . 

The camming of good luck. 

So Good-luck came, and on my roofe did light, 
Like noyse-lesse Snow ; or as the dew of night : 
Not all at once, but gently, as the trees 
Are, by the Sun-beams, tickel'd by degrees. 

The Present : or, The Bag of the Bee. 

Fly to my Mistresse, pretty pilfring Bee, 
And say, thou bring'st this Hony-bag from me : 
When on her lip, thou hast thy sweet dew plac't, 
Mark, if her tongue, but slily, steale a taste. 
If so, we live ; if not, with mournfull humme, 
Tole forth my death ; next, to my buryall come. 



On Love. 

Love bade me aske a gift, 

And I no more did move, 
But this, that I might shift 

Still with my clothes, my Love : 
That favour granted was ; 

Since which, though I love many. 
Yet so it comes to passe, 

That long I love not any. 

The Hock-Cart, or Harvest Home : 

To the Right Honourable, 

Mildmay, Earle of 

Westmorland. 

Come Sons of Summer, by whose toile. 
We are the Lords of Wine and Oile : 
By whose tough labours, and rough hands, 
We rio up first, then reap our lands. 
Crown'd with the eares of corne, now come, 
And, to the Pipe, sing Harvest home. 
Come forth, my Lord, and see the Cart 
Drest up with all the Country Art. 



Hesperides. i o i 

See, here a Maukin, there a sheet, 

As spotlesse pure, as it is sweet : lo 

The Horses, Mares, and frisking Fillies, 

(Clad, all, in Linnen, white as Lillies.) 

The Harvest Swaines, and Wenches bound 

For joy, to see the Hock-cari crown'd. 

About the Cart, heare, how the Rout 15 

Of Rurall Younglings raise the shout ; 

Pressing before, some coming after. 

Those with a shout, and these with laughter. 

Some blesse the Cart ; some kisse the sheaves ; 

Some prank them up with Oaken leaves : 20 

Some crosse the Fill-horse ; some with great 

Devotion, stroak the home-borne wheat : 

While other Rusticks, lesse attent 

To Prayers, then to Merryment, 

Run after with their breeches rent. 25 

Well, on, brave boyes, to your Lords Hearth, 

Glitt'ring with fire ; where, for your mirth, 

Ye shall see first the large and cheefe 

Foundation of your Feast, Fat Beefe : 

With Upper Stories, Mutton, Veale 30 

And Bacon, (which makes full the meale) 

With sev'rall dishes standing by. 

As here a Custard, there a Pie, 

And here all tempting Frumentie. 

And for to make the merry cheere, 35 

If smirking Wine be wanting here. 

There's that, which drowns all care, stout Beere ; 

Which freely drink to your Lords health, 

Then to the Plough, (the Common-wealth) 

Next to your Flailes, your Fanes, your Fatts ; 40 

Then to the Maids with Wheaten Hats : 

To the rough Sickle, and crookt Sythe, 

Drink frollick boyes, till all be blythe. 

Feed, and grow fat ; and as ye eat, 

Be mindfull, that the lab'ring Neat 45 

(As you) may have their fill of meat. 

And know, besides, ye must revoke 

The patient Oxe unto the Yoke, 

And all goe back unto the Plough 

And Harrow, (though they'r hang'd up now.) 50 



I02 Hesperides. 



And, you must know, your Lords word's true, 

Feed him ye must, whose food fils you. 

And that this pleasure is hke raine, 

Not sent ye for to drowne your paine. 

But for to make it spring againe. 55 



The Perfume. 

To-morrow, Julia, I betimes must rise, 

For some small fault, to offer sacrifice : 

The Altar's ready ; Fire to consume 

The fat ; breathe thou, and there's the rich perfume. 



Upon her Voice. 

Let but thy voice engender with the string, 
And Angels will be borne, while thou dost sing. 



Not to love. 

He that will not love, must be 

My Scholar, and learn this of me : 

There be in Love as many feares, 

As the Summers Come has eares : 

Sighs, and sobs, and sorrowes more S 

Then the sand, that makes the shore : 

Freezing cold, and firie heats, 

Fainting swoones, and deadly sweats ; 

Now an Ague, then a Fever, 

Both tormenting Lovers ever. lo 

Wods't thou know, besides all these. 

How hard a woman 'tis to please ? 

How crosse, how sullen, and how soone 

She shifts and changes like the Moone. 

How false, how hollow she's in heart ; 15 

And how she is her owne least part : 

How high she's priz'd, and worth but small ; 

Little thou't love, or not at all. 



Hesperides. 103 

To Mustek. A Song. 

Musick, thou Queen of Heaven, Care-charming-spel, 

That strik'st a stilnesse into hell : 
Thou that tam'st Tygers, and fierce storms (that rise) 

With thy soule-melting Lullabies : 
Fall down, down, down, from those thy chiming spheres, 5 
To charme our soules, as thou enchant'st our eares. 



To the Western wind. 

Sweet Western Wind, whose luck it is, 
(Made rivall with the aire) 

To give Ferenn'as lip a kisse, 
And fan her wanton haire. 

Bring me but one. He promise thee, 
Instead of common showers. 

Thy wings shall be embalm'd by me, 
And all beset with flowers. 



Upon the death of his Sparrow. 
An Elegie. 

Why doe not all fresh maids appeare 

To work Love's Sampler onely here, 

Where spring-time smiles throughout the yeare? 

Are not here Rose-buds, Finks, all flowers. 

Nature begets by th' Sun and showers, 

Met in one Hearce-cloth, to ore-spred 

The body of the under-dead ? 

Phill, the late dead, the late dead Deare, 

O 1 may no eye distill a Teare 

For you once lost, who weep not here ! 

Had Lesbia (too-too-kind) but known 

This Sparrow, she had scorn'd her own : 

And for this dead which under-lies. 

Wept out her heart, as well as eyes. 



ID4 Hesperides. 



But endlesse Peace, sit here, and keep 15 

My Phill, the time he has to sleep, 

And thousand Virgins come and weep. 

To make these flowrie Carpets show 

Fresh, as their blood ; and ever grow. 

Till passengers shall spend their doome, 20 

Not Virgil's Gnat had such a Tomb. 



To Primroses fiUd with morning-dew. 

I. Why doe ye weep, sweet Babes ? can Tears 
Speak griefe in you. 
Who were but borne 
Just as the modest Morne 

Teem'd her refreshing dew ? 5 

Alas you have not known that shower, 
That marres a flower ; 
Nor felt th'unkind 
Breath of a blasting wind ; 
Nor are ye worne with yeares ; 10 

Or warpt, as we, 
Who think it strange to see, 
Such pretty flowers, (like to Orphans young) 
To speak by Teares, before ye have a Tongue. 

2. Speak, whimp'ring Younglings, and make known 15 

The reason, why 
Ye droop, and weep ; 
Is it for want of sleep ? 
Or childish Lullabie ? 
Or that ye have not seen as yet ao 

The Violet i 
Or brought a kisse 
From that Sweet-heart, to this ? 
No, no, this sorrow shown 

By your teares shed, aj 

Wo'd have this Lecture read, 
That things of greatest, so of meanest worth, 
Conceiv'd with grief are, and with teares brought forth. 



Hesperides. 105 



How Roses came red. 

Roses at first were white, 
Till they co'd not agree, 

Whether my Sapho's breast, 
Or they more white sho'd be. 

But being vanquisht quite, 
A blush their cheeks bespred ; 

Since which (beleeve the rest) 
The Roses first came red. 



Comfort to a Lady upon the Death 
of her Husband. 

Dry your sweet cheek, long drown'd with sorrows raine ; 

Since Clouds disperst. Suns guild the Aire again. 

Seas chafe and fret, and beat, and over-boile ; 

But turne soone after calme, as Balme, or Oile. 

Winds have their time to rage ; but when they cease, 

The leavie-trees nod in a still-born peace. 

Your storme is over ; Lady, now appeare 

Like to the peeping spring-time of the yeare. 

Off then with grave clothes ; put fresh colours on ; 

And flow, and flame, in your Vermillion. 

Upon your cheek sate Ysicles awhile ; 

Now let the Rose raigne like a Queene, and smile. 



How Violets came blew. 

Love on a day (wise Poets tell) 
Some time in wrangling spent, 

Whether the Violets sho'd excell. 
Or she, in sweetest scent. 

But Venus having lost the day, 
Poore Girles, she fell on you 

And beat ye so, (as some dare say) 
Her blowes did make ye blew. 



1 o 6 Hesperides. 



I'd the Willow-tree. 

1 . Thou art to all lost love the best, 

The onely true plant found, 
Wherewith young men and maids distrest. 
And left of love, are crown'd. 

2. When once the Lovers Rose is dead, g 

Or laid aside forlorne j 
Then Willow-garlands, 'bout the head, 
Bedew'd with teares, are worne. 

3. When with Neglect, (the Lovers bane) 

Poore Maids rewarded be, 10 

For their love lost ; their onely gaine 
Is but a Wreathe from thee. 

4. And underneath thy cooling shade, 

(When weary of the light) 
The love-spent Youth, and love-sick Maid, 15 

Come to weep out the night. 



M.rs. Eliz. Wheeler, under the name of the 
lost Shepardesse. 

Among the Mirtles, as I walkt, 

Love and my sighs thus intertalkt : 

Tell me, said I, in deep distresse. 

Where I may find my Shepardesse. 

Thou foole, said Love, know'st thou not this ? 5 

In every thing that's sweet, she is. 

In yond' Carnation goe and seek, 

There thou shalt find her lip and cheek : 

In that ennamel'd Pansie by, 

There thou shalt have her curious eye : 10 

In bloome of Peach, and Roses bud, 

There waves the Streamer of her blood. 

'Tis true, said I, and thereupon 

I went to pluck them one by one, 

To make of parts an union ; 15 

But on a sudden all were gone. 



Hesperides. 107 



At which I stopt ; Said Love, these be 

The true resemblances of thee ; 

For as these flowers, thy joyes must die. 

And in the turning of an eye ; 

And all thy hopes of her must wither, 

Like those short sweets ere knit together. 

TO THE KING. 

If when these Lyricks (Cesar) You shall heare. 
And that Apollo shall so touch Your eare, 
As for to make this, that, or any one 
Number, Your owne, by free Adoption ; 
That Verse, of all the Verses here, shall be 
The Heire to This great Realme of Poetry. 

TO THE QUEENE. 

Goddesse of Youth, and Lady of the Spring, 

[Most fit to be the Consort to a King) 

Be pleas'd to rest you in This Sacred Grove, 

Beset with Mirtles ; whose each leafe drops Love. 

Many a sweet-fac't Wood-Nymph here is seene, 

Of which chast Order You are now the Queene : 

Witnesse their Homage, when they come and strew 

Your Walks with Flowers, and give their Crowns to you. 

Your Leavie-Throne (with Lilly-vork) possesse ; 

And be both Princesse here, and Poetresse. 

T'he Poets good wishes for the most 

hopefull and handsome Prince., 

the Duke of Yorke. 

May his pretty Duke-ship grow 
Like t' a Rose oi Jericho : 
Sweeter far, then ever yet 
Showrs or Sun-shines co'd beget. 
May the Graces, and the Howers 
Strew his hopes, and Him with flowers : 



I o 8 Hesperides. 



And so dresse him up with Love, 

As to be the Chick oljove. 

May the thrice-three-Sisters sing 

Him the Soveraigne of their Spring : lo 

And entitle none to be 

Prince of Hellicon, but He. 

May his soft foot, where it treads, 

Gardens thence produce and Meads : 

And those Meddowes full be set ij 

With the Rose, and Violet. 

May his ample Name be knowne 

To the last succession : 

And his actions high be told 

Through the world, but writ in gold. ao 



To Anthea, who may command him any thing. 

1. Bid me to live, and I will live 

Thy Protestant to be : 
Or bid me love, and I will give 
A loving heart to thee. 

2. A heart as soft, a heart as kind, 5 

A heart as sound and free. 
As in the whole world thou canst find, 
That heart He give to thee. 

3. Bid that heart stay, and it will stay, 

To honour thy Decree : 10 

Or bid it languish quite away, 
And't shall doe so for thee. 

4. Bid me to weep, and I will weep. 

While I have eyes to see : 
And having none, yet I will keep 15 

A heart to weep for thee. 

5. Bid me despaire, and He despaire. 

Under that Cypresse tree : 
Or bid me die, and I will dare 
E'en Death, to die for thee. ao 



Hesperides. 109 



6. Thou art my life, my love, my heart, 
The very eyes of me : 
And hast command of every part. 
To live and die for thee. 

Prevision, or Provision. 

That Prince takes soone enough the Victors roome, 
Who first provides, not to be overcome. 

Obedience in Subjects. 

The Gods to Kings the Judgement give to sway : 
The Subjects onely glory to obay. 

More potent, lesse peccant. 

He that may sin, sins least ; Leave to transgresse 
Enfeebles m-uch the seeds of wickednesse. 

Upon a maid that dyed the day 
she was marryed. 

That Morne which saw me made a Bride, 
The Ev'ning witnest that I dy'd. 
Those holy lights, wherewith they guide 
Unto the bed the bashfull Bride ; 
Serv'd, but as Tapers, for to burne. 
And light my Reliques to their Urne. 
This Epitaph, which here you see, 
Supply'd the Epithalamie. 

To Meddowes. 

1. Ye have been fresh and green. 

Ye have been fill'd with flowers : 
And ye the Walks have been 

Where Maids have spent their houres. 

2. You have beheld, how they 

With Wicker Arks did come 
To kisse, and beare away 
The richer Couslips home. 



no Hesperides. 



3. Y'ave heard them sweetly sing, 

And seen them in a Round : 10 

Each Virgin, like a Spring, 
With Hony-succles crown'd. 

4. But now, we see, none here. 

Whose silv'rie feet did tread, 
And with dishevell'd Haire, 15 

Adorn'd this smoother Mead. 

5. Like Unthrifts, having spent, 

Your stock, and needy grown, 
Y'are left here to lament 

Your poore estates, alone. 20 

Crosses. 

Though good things answer many good intents ; 
Crosses doe still bring forth the best events. 



Miseries. 

Though hourely comforts from the Gods we see. 
No life is yet life-proof e from miserie. 



Laugh and lie downe. 

Y'ave laught enough (sweet) vary now your Text ; 
And laugh no more ; or laugh, and lie down next. 



To his Houshold gods. 

Rise, Houshold-gods, and let us goe ; 
But whither, I my selfe not know. 
First, let us dwell on rudest seas ; 
Next, with severest Salvages ; 
Last, let us make our best abode. 
Where humane foot, as yet, n'er trod : 
Search worlds of Ice ; and rather there 
Dwell, then in lothed Devonshire. 



Hesperides. 1 1 1 

To the Nightingale, and Robin-Red-brest. 

When I departed am, ring thou my knell, 
Thou pittifull, and pretty Fhilomel : 
And when I'm laid out for a Corse ; then be 
Thou Sexton {Red-bresi) for to cover me. 



To the Tew and Cypresse to grace his 
Funerall. 

Both you two have 
Relation to the grave : 
And where 
The Fun' rail- Trump sounds, you are there. 

I shall be made 
Ere long a fleeting shade : 
Pray come, 
And doe some honour to my Tomb. 

Do not deny 
My last request ; for I 
Will be 
ThankfuU to you, or friends, for me. 



/ call and I call. 

I call, I call, who doe ye call ? 

The Maids to catch this Cowslip-ball : 

But since these Cowslips fading be, 

Troth, leave the flowers, and Maids, take me. 

Yet, if that neither you will doe. 

Speak but the word, and He take you. 



On a perfunHd Lady. 

You say y'are sweet ; how sho'd we know 
Whether that you be sweet or no ? 
From Fmvders and Perfumes keep free j 
Then we shall smell how sweet you be. 



112 Hesperides. 

A Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on Sir 
Clipseby Crew and his Lady. 

1. What's that we see from far? the spring of Day 
Bloom'd from the East, or faire Injewel'd May 

Blowne out of April ; or some New- 
Star fill'd with glory to our view, 

Reaching at heaven, 5 

To adde a nobler Planet to the seven ? 

Say, or doe we not descrie 
Some Goddesse, in a cloud of TifTanie 
To move, or rather the 
Emergent Venus from the Sea? lo 

2. 'Tis she ! 'tis she ! or else some more Divine 
Enlightned substance ; mark how from the Shrine 

Of holy Saints she paces on, 
Treading upon Vermilion 

And Amber ; Spice- 15 

ing the Chafte Aire with fumes of Paradise. 

Then come on, come on, and yeeld 
A savour like unto a blessed field, 

When the bedabled Morne 
Washes the golden eares of come. ao 

3. See where she comes ; and smell how all the street 
Breathes Vine-yards and Pomgranats : O how sweet ! 

As a fir'd Altar, is each stone, 
Perspiring pounded Cynamon. 

The Phenix nest, 25 

Built up of odours, burneth in her breast. 

Who therein wo'd not consume 
His soule to Ash-heaps in that rich perfume ? 
Bestroaking Fate the while 
He burnes to Embers on the Pile. 30 

4. Himen, O Himen I Tread the sacred ground ; 

Shew thy white feet, and head with Marjoram crown'd : 
Mount up thy flames, and let thy Torch 
Display the Bridegroom in the porch, 

In his desires 3g 

More towring, more disparkling then thy fires : 



Hesperides. 113 

Shew her how his eyes do turne 
A.nd roule about, and in their motions burne 
Their balls to Cindars : haste, 
Or else to ashes he will waste. 40 



Ghde by the banks of Virgins then, and passe 
The Shewers of Roses, lucky-foure-leav'd grasse : 

The while the cloud of younglings sing. 

And drown yee with a flowrie Spring : 

While some repeat 45 

Yodr praise, and bless you, sprinkling you with Wheat : 

While that others doe divine ; 
Blest is the Bride, on whom the Sun doth shine ; 
And thousands gladly wish 

You multiply, as doth a Fish. 50 



6. And beautious Bride we do confess y'are wise. 
In dealing forth these bashfull jealousies : 
In Lov's name do so ; and a price 
Set on your selfe, by being nice : 

But yet take heed ; 55 

What now you seem, be not the same indeed. 

And turne Apostate : Love will 
Part of the way be met ; or sit stone-still. 

On then, and though you slow- 
ly go, yet, howsoever, go. 60 



And now y'are enter'd ; see the Codled Cook 
Runs from his Torrid Zone, to prie, and look. 

And blesse his dainty Mistresse : see, 

The Aged point out. This is she. 

Who now must sway 65 

The House (Love shield her) with her Yea and Nay : 

And the smirk Butler thinks it 
Sin, in's Nap'rie, not to express his wit ; 
Each striving to devise 

Some gin, wherewith to catch your eyes. 70 



114 Hesperides. 



8. To bed, to bed, kind Turtles, now, and write 
This the short'st day, and this the longest night ; 
But yet too short for you : 'tis we, 
Who count this night as long as three, 

Lying alone, 7S 

Telling the Clock strike Ten, Eleven, Twelve, One. 

Quickly, quickly then prepare ; 
And let the Young-men and the Bride-maids share 
Your Garters ; and their joynts 
Encircle with the Bride-grooms Points. 80 



By the Brides eyes, and by the teeming life 
Of her green hopes, we charge ye, that no strife, 

(Farther then Gentlenes tends) gets place 

Among ye, striving for her lace : 

O doe not fall 85 

Foule in these noble pastimes, lest ye call 

Discord in, and so divide 
The youthfuU Bride-groom, and the fragrant Bride : 
Which Love fore-fend ; but spoken 

Be't to your praise, no peace was broken. 90 



10. Strip her of Spring-time, tender-whimpring-maids. 
Now Autumne's come, when all those flowrie aids 
Of her Delayes must end ; Dispose 
That Lady-smock, that Pansie, and that Rose 

Neatly apart ; 95 

But for Prick-madam, and for Gentle-heart ; 

And soit-Maidens-blush, the Bride 
Makes holy these, all others lay aside : 

Then strip her, or unto her 
Let him come, who dares undo her. 100 



1 1. And to enchant yea more, see every where 
About the Roofe a Syren in a Sphere ; 
(As we think) singing to the dinne 
Of many a warbling Cherubim : 

104 Cherubifii] Probably a mistake for Cheruliin 



Hesperides. 115 



O marke yee how 
The soule of Nature melts in numbers : now 

See, a thousand Cupids flye, 
To light their Tapers at the Brides bright eye. 
To Bed ; or her they'l tire, 
Were she an Element of fire. 



. And to your more bewitching, see, the proud 
Plumpe Bed beare up, and swelling like a cloud, 
Tempting the two too modest ; can 
Yee see it brusle like a Swan, 

And you be cold 115 

To meet it, when it woo's and seemes to fold 
The Armes to hugge it ? throw, throw 
Your selves into the mighty over-flow 

Of that white Pride, and Drowne 
The night, with you, in floods of Downe. no 



13. The bed is ready, and the maze of Love 
Lookes for the treaders ; every where is wove 
Wit and new misterie ; read, and 
Put in practise, to understand 

And know each wile, 125 

Each hieroglyphick of a kisse or smile ; 

And do it to the full ; reach 
High in your own conceipt, and some way teach 
Nature and Art, one more 
Play then they ever knew before. 130 



14. If needs we must for Ceremonies-sake, 
Blesse a Sack-posset ; Luck go with it ; take 

The Night-Charme quickly ; you have spells. 
And magicks for to end, and hells, 

To passe; but such 135 

And of such Torture as no one would grutch 

To live therein for ever : Erie 
And consume, and grow again to die, 

And live, and in that case, 
Love the confusion of the place. 140 



1 6 Hesperides. 



15. But since It must be done, dispatch, and sowe 
Up in a sheet your Bride, and what if so 

It be with Rock, or walles of Brasse, 
Ye Towre her up, as Danae was ; 

Thinke you that this, 145 

Or hell it selfe a powerfull Bulwarke is ? 

I tell yee no ; but like a 
Bold bolt of thunder he will make his way, 

And rend the cloud, and throw 
The sheet about, like flakes of snow. 150 

16. All now is husht in silence; Midivife-moone, 
With all her Owle-ey'd issue begs a boon 

Which you must grant ; that's entrance ; with 
Which extract, all we can call pith 

And quintiscence 155 

Of Planetary bodies ; so commence 

All faire Constellations 
Looking upon yee. That two Nations 

Springing from two such Fires, 
May blaze the vertue of their Sires. 160 



The silken Snake. 

For sport my Julia threw a Lace 
Of silke and silver at my face : 
Watchet the silke was ; and did make 
A shew, as if 't 'ad been a snake : 
The suddenness did me affright ; 
But though it scar'd, it did not bite. 



Upon himselfe. 

I am Sive-like, and can hold 
Nothing hot, or nothing cold. 
Put in Love, and put in too 
Jealousie, and both will through : 
Put in Feare, and hope, and doubt ; 
What comes in, runnes quickly out : 

Z58 That two Nations] that, That Nations Some copies 0/1648 



Hesperides. 117 



Put in secrecies withall, 
What ere enters, out it shall : 
But if you can stop the Sive, 
For mine own part I'de as Have, 
Maides sho'd say, or Virgins sing, 
Herrick keeps, as holds nothing. 



Upon Love. 

Love's a thing, (as I do heare) 

Ever full of pensive feare ; 

Rather then to which I'le fall, 

Trust me, I'le not like at all : 

If to love I should entend. 

Let my haire then stand an end : 

And that terrour likewise prove, 

Fatall to me in my love. 

But if horrour cannot slake 

Flames, which wo'd an entrance make ; 

Then the next thing I desire, 

Is to love, and live i'th fire. 



Reverence to Riches. 

Like to the Income must be our expence ; 
Mans Fortune must be had in reverence. 



Devotion makes the 'Deity. 

Who formes a Godhead out of Gold or Stone, 
Makes not a God ; but he that prayes to one. 



To all young men that love. 

I could wish you all, who love. 
That ye could your thoughts remove 
From your Mistresses, and be, 
Wisely wanton (like to me.) 



1 1 8 Hesperides. 



I could wish you dispossest 

Of that Fiend that marres your rest; 

And with Tapers comes to fright 

Your weake senses in the night. 

I co'd wish, ye all, who frie 

Cold as Ice, or coole as I. 

But if flames best like ye, then 

Much good do't ye Gentlemen. 

I a merry heart will keep. 

While you wring your hands and weep. 



^he Eyes. 

'Tis a known principle in War, 
The eies be first, that conquer'd are. 



No fault in women. 

No fault in women to refuse 

The offer, which they most wo'd chuse. 

No fault in women, to confesse 

How tedious they are in their dresse. 

No fault in women, to lay on 5 

The tincture of Vermillion : 

And there to give the cheek a die 

Of white, where nature doth deny. 

No fault in women, to make show 

Of largeness, when th'are nothing so : lo 

(When true it is, the out-side swels 

With inward Buckram, little else.) 

No fault in women, though they be 

But seldome from suspition free : 

No fault in womankind, at all, 15 

If they but slip, and never fall. 



Hesperides. 119 

Oberons Feast. 

Shapcot I To thee the Fairy State 

I with discretion, dedicate. 

Because thou prizest things that are 

Curious, and un-familiar. 

Take first the feast ; these dishes gone ; 5 

Wee'i see the Fairy-Court anon. 

A little mushroome table spred, 

After short prayers, they set on bread ; 

A Moon-parcht grain of purest wheat, 

With some small glit'ring gritt, to eate lo 

His choyce bitts with ; then in a trice 

They make a feast lesse great then nice. 

But all this while his eye is serv'd, 

We must not thinke his eare was sterv'd : 

But that there was in place to stir 15 

His Spleen, the chirring Grasshopper ; 

The merry Cricket, puling Flie, 

The piping Gnat for minstralcy. 

And now, we must imagine first, 

The Elves present to quench his thirst ao 

A pure seed-Pearle of Infant dew. 

Brought and besweetned in a blew 

And pregnant violet ; which done, 

His kitling eyes begin to runne 

Quite through the table, where he spies 25 

The homes of paperie Butterflies, 

Of which he eates, and tastes a little 

Of that we call the Cuckoes spittle. 

A little Fuz-ball-pudding stands 

By, yet not blessed by his hands, 30 

That was too coorse ; but then forthwith 

He ventures boldly on the pith 

Of sugred Rush, and eates the sagge 

And well bestrutted Bees sweet bagge : 

Gladding his pallat with some store 35 

Of Emits eggs ; what wo'd he more ? 

But Beards of Mice, a Newt's stew'd thigh, 

A bloated Earewig, and a Flie ; 

I the] om. J648 : corr. in Qrig. Errata, 



1 2 o Hesperides. 



With the Red-capt worme, that's shut 

Within the concave of a Nut, ^o 

Browne as his Tooth. A little Moth, 

Late fatned in a piece of cloth : 

With withered cherries ; Mandrakes eares ; 

Moles eyes ; to these, the slain-Stags teares : 

The unctuous dewlaps of a Snaile ; 45 

The broke-heart of a Nightingale 

Ore-come in musicke ; with a wine, 

Ne're ravight from the flattering Vine, 

But gently prest from the soft side 

Of the most sweet and dainty Bride, 50 

Brought in a dainty daizie, which 

He fully quaiiFs up to bewitch 

His blood to height ; this done, commended 

Grace by his Priest ; The feast is ended. 

Event of things not in our power. 

By Time, and Counsell, doe the best we can, 
Th'event is never in the power of man. 

Upon her blush. 

When Julia blushes, she do's show 
Cheeks like to Roses, when they blow. 

Merits make the man. 

Our Honours, and our Commendations be 
Due to the Merits, not Authoritie. 

To Virgins. 

Heare ye Virgins, and He teach, 

What the times of old did preach. 

Rosamond was in a Bower 

Kept, as Danae in a Tower : 

But yet Love (who subtile is) e 

Crept to that, and came to this. 

Be ye lockt up like to these, 

Or the rich Hesperides ; 



Hesperides. 121 



Or those Babies in your eyes, 
In their Christall Nunneries ; 
Notwithstanding Love will win, 
Or else force a passage in : 
And as coy be, as you can, 
Gifts will get ye, or the man. 

Venue. 

Each must, in vertue, strive for to excell ; 
Tliat man lives twice, that lives the first life well. 



The Bell-man. 

From noise of Scare-fires rest ye free. 
From Murders Benedicitie. 
From all mischances, that may fright 
Your pleasing slumbers in the night : 
Mercie secure ye all, and keep 
The Goblin from ye, while ye sleep. 
Past one aclock, and almost two, 
My Masters all. Good day to you. 



Bashfulnesse. 

Of all our parts, the eyes expresse 
The sweetest kind of bashfulnesse. 



To the most accomplisht Gentleman, 

Master Edward Norgate, 

Clark of the Signet to His 

Majesty. Epig. 

For one so rarely tun'd to fit all parts ; 
For one to whom espous'd are all the Arts ; 
Long have I sought for : but co'd never see 
Them all concenter'd in one man, but Thee. 
Thus, thou, that man art, whom the Fates conspir'd 
To make but One (an<J th9,t's thy selfe) admir'd. 



122 Hesperides. 

Upon Prudence Baldwin her sicknesse. 

Prue, my dearest Maid, is sick, 
Almost to be Lunatick : 
JEsculapius 1 come and bring 
Means for her recovering ; 
And a gallant Cock shall be 
Oiifer'd up by Her, to Thee. 



To Apollo. A short Hymne. 

Phxbus / when that I a Verse, 
Or some numbers more rehearse ; 
Tune my words, that they may fall, 
Each way smoothly Musical! : 
For which favour, there shall be 
Swans devoted unto thee. 



A Hymne to Bacchus. 

Bacchus, let me drink no more ; 
Wild are Seas, that want a shore. 
When our drinking has no stint, 
There is no one pleasure in't. 
I have drank up for to please 
Thee, that great cup Hercules : 
Urge no more ; and there shall be 
Daffadills g'en up to Thee. 



On himselfe. 

Here down my wearyed limbs He lay ; 
My Pilgrims staffe ; my weed of grey : 
My Palmers hat ; my Scallops shell ; 
My Crosse ; my Cord ; and all farewell. 

Upon Prudence Baldwin. Prudence] Brudence 164S (jnisprinfj 
To Afollo. 2 Or] In Grosart's copy 0/1648, Or, he says, is misfrit^^d Qi 



Hesperides. 123 



For having now my journey done, 5 

(Just at the setting of the Sun) 

Here I have found a Chamber fit, 

(God and good friends be thankt for it) 

Where if I can a lodger be 

A little while from Tramplers free ; lo 

At my up-rising next, I shall, 

If not requite, yet thank ye all. 

Meane while, the Holy-Hood hence fright 

The fouler Fiend, and evill Spright, 

From scaring you or yours this night. 15 



Casualties. 

Good things, that come of course, far lesse doe please. 
Then those, which come by sweet contingences. 



Bribes and Gifts get all. 

Dead falls the Cause, if once the Hand be mute ; 
But let that speak, the Client gets the suit. 



T^he end. 

If well thou hast begun, goe on fore-right ; 
It is the End that crownes us, not the Fight. 



Upon a child that dyed. 

Here she lies, a pretty bud, 
Lately made of flesh and blood : 
Who, as soone, fell fast asleep. 
As her little eyes did peep. 
Give her strewings ; but not stir 
The earth, that lightly covers her. 



124 Hesperides . 

Content, not cates. 

'Tis not the food, but the content 
That makes the Tables merriment. 
Where Trouble serves the board, we eate 
The Platters there, as soone as meat. 
A little Pipkin with a bit 
Of Mutton, or of Veale in it, 
Set on my Table, (Trouble-free) 
More then a Feast contenteth me. 



The Entertainment : or, Porch-verse, at the 

Marriage of Mr. Hen. Northly, and 

the most witty Mrs. Lettice Yard. 

Weelcome ! but yet no entrance, till we blesse 
First you, then you, and both for white successe. 
Profane no Porch young man and maid, for fear 
Ye wrong the Threshold-god, that keeps peace here : 
Please him, and then all good-luck will betide 
You, the brisk Bridegroome, you the dainty Bride. 
Do all things sweetly, and in comely wise ; 
Put on your Garlands first, then Sacrifice : 
That done ; when both of you have seemly fed, 
We'll call on Night, to bring ye both to Bed : 
Where being laid, all Faire signes looking on. 
Fish-like, encrease then to a million : 
And millions of spring-times may ye have, 
Which spent, one death, bring to ye both one Grave. 



The good-night or Blessing. 

Blessings, in abundance come. 
To the Bride, and to her Groome j 
May the Bed, and this short night. 
Know the fulness of delight ! 

The Entertainment. 14 one death] on death. j(5.^<S 



Hesperides, 125 



Pleasures, many here attend ye, 
And ere long, a Boy Love send ye 
Curld and comely, and so trimme, 
Maides (in time) may ravish him. 
Thus a dew of Graces fall 
On ye both ; Goodnight to all. 



To Daffadills. 

Faire Daffadills, we weep to see 

You haste away so soone : 
As yet the early-rising Sun 
Has not attain'd his Noone. 
Stay, stay, 
Untill the hasting day 

Has run 
But to the Even-song ; 
And, having pray'd together, we 
Will goe with you along. 



We have short time to stay, as you, 

We have as short a Spring ; 
As quick a growth to meet Decay, 
As you, or any thing. 

We die, 15 

As your hours doe, and drie 

Away, 
Like to the Summers raine ; 
Or as the pearles of Mornings dew 

Ne'r to be found againe. ao 



To a Maid, 

You say, you love me ; that I thus nmst prove ; 
If that you lye, then I will sweare you love. 



12 6 Hesperides. 

Upon a Lady that dyed in child-bed, and left 
a daughter behind her. 

As Gilly flowers do but stay 

To blow, and seed, and so away ; 

So you sweet Lady (sweet as May) 

The gardens-glory liv'd a while, 

To lend the world your scent and smile. 5 

But when your own faire print was set 

Once in a Virgin JFloscukt, 

(Sweet as your selfe, and newly blown) 

To give that life, resign'd your own : 

But so, as still the mothers power lo 

Lives in the pretty Lady-flower. 

A New-yeares gift sent to Sir Simeon 
Steward 

No newes of Navies burnt at Seas ; 

No noise of late spawn'd Tittyries : 

No closset plot, or open vent. 

That frights men with a Parliament : 

No new devise, or late found trick, S 

To read by th' Starres, the Kingdoms sick : 

No ginne to catch the State, or wring 

The free-born Nosthrills of the King, 

We send to you ; but here a jolly 

Verse crown'd with JTvie, and with Holly : lo 

That tels of Winters Tales and Mirth, 

That Milk-maids make about the hearth, 

Of Christmas sports, the Wassell-boule, 

That tost up, after Fox-i'tKhole : 

Of Blind-man-buffe, and of the care 15 

That young men have to shooe the Mare : 

Of Twelf-tide Cakes, of Pease, and Beanes 

Wherewith ye make those merry Sceanes, 

When as ye chuse your King and Queen, 

And cry out. Hey, for our town green. 30 

A New-yeares gift, 8 Nosthrills] Nosthrill Some copies of 164S 



Hesperides. 12 J 

Of Ash-heapes, in the which ye use 

Husbands and Wives by streakes to chuse : 

Of crackling Laurell, which fore-sounds, 

A Plentious harvest to your grounds : 

Of these, and such like things, for shift, 25 

We send in stead of New-yeares gift. 

Read then, and when your faces shine 

With bucksome meat and capring Wine : 

Remember us in Cups full crown'd, 

And let our Citie-health go round, 30 

Quite through the young maids and the men, 

To the ninth number, if not tenne ; 

Untill the fired Chesnuts leape 

For joy, to see the fruits ye reape. 

From the plumpe Challice, and the Cup, 35 

That tempts till it be tossed up : 

Then as ye sit about your embers, 

Call not to mind those fled Decembers ; 

But think on these, that are t'appeare. 

As Daughters to the instant yeare : 40 

Sit crown'd with Rose-buds, and carouse. 

Till Liber Pater twirles the house 

About your eares ; and lay upon 

The yeare (your cares) that's fled and gon. 

And let the russet Swaines the Plough 45 

And Harrow hang up resting now ; 

And to the Bag-pipe all addresse ; 

Till sleep takes place of wearinesse. 

And thus, throughout, with Christmas playes 

Frolick the full twelve Holy-dayes. 50 



Mattens, or morning Prayer. 

When with the Virgin morning thou do'st rise, 
Crossing thy selfe ; come thus to sacrifice : 
First wash thy heart in innocence, then bring 
Pure hands, pure habits, pure, pure every thing. 
Next to the Altar humbly kneele, and thence, 
Give up thy soule in clouds of frankinsence. 
Thy golden Censors fil'd with odours sweet. 
Shall make thy actions with their ends to meet. 



12 8 Hesperides. 



Evensong. 

Beginne with Jove ; then is the worke halfe done ; 
And runnes most smoothly, when tis well begunne. 
Jov^s is the first and last : The Morn's his due, 
The midst is thine; \m.iJoves the Evening too ; 
As sure as Mattins do's to him belong, 
So sure he layes claime to the Evensong. 



The Braclet to Julia. 

Why I tye about thy wrist, 
Julia, this my silken twist ; 
For what other reason is't, 
But to shew thee how in part, 
Thou my pretty Captive art ? 
But thy Bondslave is my heart : 
'Tis but silke that bindeth thee. 
Knap the thread, and thou art free : 
But 'tis otherwise with me ; 
I am bound, and fast bound so. 
That from thee I cannot go ; 
If I co'd, I we'd not so. 



The Christian Militant. 

A man prepar'd against all ills to come. 

That dares to dead the fire of martirdome : 

That sleeps at home ; and sayling there at ease, 

Feares not the fierce sedition of the Seas : 

That's counter-proofe against the Farms mishaps, 

UndreadfuU too of courtly thunderclaps : 

That weares one face (like heaven) and never showes 

A change, when Fortune either comes, or goes : 

That keepes his own strong guard, in the despight 

Of what can hurt by day, or harme by night : 

That takes and re-delivers every stroake 

Of Chance, (as made up all of rock, and oake :) 



Hesperides, 129 

That sighs at others death ; smiles at his own 

Most dire and horrid crucifixion. 

Who for true glory suffers thus ; we grant rs 

Him to be here our Christian militant. 



A short Hymne to Larr. 

Though I cannot give thee fires 
Glit'ring to my free desires : 
These accept, and He be free, 
Offering Poppy unto thee. 



Another to Neptune. 

Mighty Neptune, may it please 
Thee, the Rector of the Seas, 
That my Barque may safely runne 
Through thy watrie-region ; 
And a Tunnie-fish shall be 
Offer'd up, with thanks to thee. 



His embalming to Julia. 

For my embalming, Julia, do but this. 

Give thou my lips but their supreamest kiss : 

Or else trans-fuse thy breath into the chest, 

Where my small reliques must for ever rest : 

That breath the Balm, the myrrh, the Nard shal be, 

To give an incorruption unto me. 



Gold^ before Goodnesse. 

How rich a man is, all desire to know ; 
But none enquires if good he be, or no. 



130 Hesperides. 



The Kisse. A Dialogue. 

1. Among thy Fancies, tell me this, 
What is the thing we call a kisse ? 

2. I shall resolve ye, what it is. 

It is a creature born and bred 

Between the lips, (all cherrie-red,) 5 

By love and warme desires fed, 
Chor. And makes more soft the Bridall Bed. 

2. It is an active flame, that flies, 
First, to the Babies of the eyes ; 

And charmes them there with lullabies ; 10 

Chor. And stils the Bride too, when she cries. 

2. Then to the chin, the cheek, the eare, 
It frisks, and flyes, now here, now there, 
'Tis now farre off, and then tis nere ; 
Chor. And here, and there, and every where. 15 

I. Ha's it a speaking virtue? 2. Yes ; 
I. How speaks it, say ? 2. Do you but this, 
Part your joyn'd lips, then speaks your kisse ; 
Chor. And this loves sweetest language is. 

I. Has it a body ? 2. I, and wings ao 

With thousand rare encolourings : 
And as it flyes, it gently sings, 
Chor. Love, honie yeelds ; but never stings. 



The admonition. 

Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares 

In that rich Carkanet ; 
Or those on her dishevel'd haires, 

Faire Pearles in order set i 



Hesperides. 131 

Beleeve young man all those were teares 5 

By wretched Wooers sent, 
In mournfull Hyacinths and Rue, 

That figure discontent ; 
Which when not warmed by her view, 

By cold neglect, each one, lo 

Congeal'd to Pearle and stone ; 

Which precious spoiles upon her, 
She weares as trophees of her honour. 
Ah then consider ! What all this implies ; 
She that will weare thy teares, wo'd weare thine eyes. 15 



To hh honoured kinsman Sir William 
Soame. Epig. 

I can but name thee, and methinks I call 

All that have been, or are canonicall 

For love and bountie, to come neare, and see. 

Their many vertues volum'd up in thee ; 

In thee Brave Man ! Whose incorrupted fame. 

Casts forth a light hke to a Virgin flame : 

And as it shines, it throwes a scent about, 

As when a Rain-bow in perfumes goes out. 

So vanish hence, but leave a name, as sweet. 

As Benjamin, and Storax, when they meet. 

On himselfe. 

Aske me, why I do not sing 

To the tension of the string, 

As I did, not long ago, 

When my numbers full did flow ? 

Griefe (ay me !) hath struck my Lute, 

And my tongue at one time mute. 

To Larr. 

No more shall I, since I am driven hence, 
Devote to thee my graines of Frankinsence : 
No more shall I from mantle-trees hang downe, 
To honour thee, my little Parsly crown : 



132 Hesperides. 



No more shall I (I feare me) to thee bring 

My chives of Garlick for an offering : 

No more shall I, from henceforth, heare a quire 

Of merry Crickets by my Country fire, 

Go where I will, thou luckie Larr stay here, 

Warme by a glit'ring chimnie all the yeare. 



The departure of the good Daemon. 

What can I do in Poetry, 
Now the good Spirit's gone from me ? 
Why nothing now, but lonely sit. 
And over-read what I have writ. 



Clemency. 

For punishment in warre, it will suffice. 

If the chiefe Author of the faction dyes ; 

Let but few smart, but strike a feare through all : 

Where the fault springs, there let the judgement fall. 



His age, dedicated to his peculiar friend, M. John 
WickeSj under the name of Posthumus. 

r. Ah Posthumus ! Our yeares hence flye, 
And leave no sound ; nor piety. 

Or prayers, or vow 
Can keepe the wrinkle from the brow : 

But we must on, 5 

As Fate do's lead or draw us ; none, 
None, Posthumus, co'd ere decline 
The doome of cruell Proserpine. 

2. The pleasing wife, the house, the ground 
Must all be left, no one plant found 10 

To follow thee. 
Save only the Curst-Cipresse tree : 

The departure. Sec. Dsemon] TAe Malone copy of 164& in Bodleian reads 
Demon. Clemency. 2 Author] author Malone copy 



Hesperides. 133 

A merry mind 
Looks forward, scornes what's left behind : 
Let's live, my IVickes, then, while we may, 15 

And here enjoy our Holiday. 



,. Wave seen the past-best Times, and these 
Will nere return, we see the Seas, 

And Moons to wain ; 
But they fill up their Ebbs again : ao 

But vanisht man, 
Like to a Lilly-lost, nere can, 
Nere can repullulate, or bring 
His dayes to see a second Spring. 

. But on we must, and thither tend, 25 

Where Anchus and rich Tullus blend 

Their sacred seed : 
Thus has Infernall Jove decreed ; 

We must be made, 
Ere long, a song, ere long, a shade. 30 

Why then, since life to us is short. 
Lets make it full up, by our sport. 

. Crown we our Heads with Roses then, 
And 'noint with Tirian Balme ; for when 

We two are dead, 35 

The world with us is buried. 

Then live we free. 
As is the Air, and let us be 
Our own fair wind, and mark each one 
Day with the white and Luckie stone. 40 

. We are not poore ; although we have 
No roofs of Cedar, nor our brave 

Baice, nor keep 
Account of such a flock of sheep ; 

Nor Bullocks fed 45 

To lard the shambles : Barbels bred 
To kisse our hands, nor do we wish 
For Poinds Lampries in our 4ish, 



134 Hesperides. 



If we can meet, and so conferre. 

Both by a shining Salt-seller ; fio 

And have our Roofe, 
Although not archt, yet weather proofe. 

And seeling free. 
From that cheape Candle baudery : 

We'le eate our Beane with that full mirth, 55 

As we were Lords of all the earth. 



8. Well then, on what Seas we are tost, 
Our comfort is, we can't be lost. 

Let the winds drive 
Our Barke ; yet she will keepe alive 60 

Amidst the deepes ; 
Tis constancy (my Wickes) which keepes 
The Pinnace up ; which though she erres 
I'th' Seas, she saves her passengers. 

9. Say, we must part (sweet mercy blesse 65 
Us both i'th' Sea, Camp, WUdemesse) 

Can we so farre 
Stray, to become lesse circular, 

Then we are now ? 
No, no, that selfe same heart, that vow, 70 

\Vhich made us one, shall ne'r undoe ; 
Or ravell so, to make us two. 

10. Live in thy peace ; as for my selfe, 
When I am bruised on the Shelfe 

Of Time, and show 75 

My locks behung with frost and snow : 

When with the reume. 
The cough, the ptisick, I consume 
Unto an almost nothing ; then. 
The Ages fled. He call agen : 80 

I r. And with a teare comjKire these last 

Lame, and bad times, with those are past, 

While Baucis by. 
My old leane wife, shall kisse it dry : 



Hesperides. 135 

And so wel sit *5 

By'th'fire, foretelling snow and slit. 
And weather by our aches, grown 
Now old enough to be our own 



12. True Calenders, as Pusses eare 

Washt ore 's to tell what change is neare : 9° 

Then to asswage 
The gripings of the chine by age ; 

lie call my young 
liilus to sing such a song 

I made upon my Julia's brest; 95 

And of her blush at such a feast. 



13. Then shall he read that flowre of mine 
Enclos'd within a christall shrine : 

A Primrose next ; 
A piece, then of a higher text : 

For to beget 
In me a more transcendant heate. 
Then that insinuating fire. 
Which crept into each aged Sire, 



14. When the faire Hellen, firom her eyes, 10= 
Shot forth her loving Sorceries : 

At which rie reare 
Mine aged limbs above my chaire : 

And hearing it, 
Flutter and crow, as in a fit iic 

Of fresh concupiscence, and cry, 
No lust theres like to Poetry. 

15. Thus frantick crazie man (God wot) 
lie call to mind things half forgot : 

And oft between, 1T5 

Repeat the Times that I have seen ! 

90 Washt o're, to tell 1648 : Washt or 's to tell Errata neare : Douce 
cofy 0/1648 in Bodleian ; also Heber co^ : rxazt other copies 



136 Hesperides, 

Thus ripe with tears. 
And twisting my lulus hairs ; 
Doting, He weep and say (In Truth) 
Baucis, these were my sins of youth. 120 

16. Then next He cause my hopefull Lad 
(If a wild Apple can be had) 

To crown the Hearth, 
(Larr thus conspiring with our mirth) 

. Then to infuse 125 

Our browner Ale into the cruse : 
Which sweetly spic't, we'l first carouse 
Unto the Genius of the house. 

17. Then the next health to friends of mine 

(Loving the brave Burgundian wine) 130 

High sons of Pith, 
Whose fortunes I have frolickt with : 

Such as co'd well 
Bear up the Magick bough, and spel : 
And dancing 'bout the Mystick Thyrse, 135 

Give up the just applause to verse : 

18. To those, and then agen to thee 
We'l drink, my Wickes, untill we be 

Plump as the cherry. 
Though not so fresh, yet full as merry 140 

As the crickit; 
The untam'd Heifer, or the Pricket, 
Untill our tongues shall tell our ears. 
Ware younger by a score of years. 

19. Thus, till we see the fire lesse shine 145 
From th' embers, then the kitlings eyne, 

We'l still sit up. 
Sphering about the wassail cup, 

To all those times, 
Which gave me honour for my Rhimes, 150 

The cole once spent, we'l then to bed, 
Farre more then night bewearied. 



Hesperides. 137 



A short hymne to Venus. 



Goddesse, I do love a Girle 

Jiubie-\vpt, and tooth'd with Pearl: 

If so be, I may but prove 

Luckie in this Maide I love : 

I will promise there shall be 5 

Mirths offer'd up to Thee. 

To a Gentlewoman on just dealing. 

True to your self, and sheets, you'l have me swear. 
You shall ; if righteous dealing I find there. 
Do not you fall through frailty ; He be sure 
To keep my Bond still free from forfeiture. 

The hand and tongue. 

Two parts of us successively command ; 

The tongue in peace ; but then in warre the hand. 

Vpon a delaying Lady. 

1. Come come away. 
Or let me go ; 
Must I here stay, 
Because y'are slow ; 

And will continue so ? 5 

Troth Lady, no. 

2. I scorne to be 
A slave to state ; 
And since I'm free, 

I will not wait, 10 

Henceforth at such a rate. 
For needy Fate. 

3. If you desire 

My spark sho'd glow. 

The peeping fire 15 

You must blow ; 

Or I shall quickly grow, 

To Frost or Snow, 



138 Hesperides. 



To the Lady Mary Villars, Govemesse to 

the Princesse Henretta 

When I of Villars doe but heare the name, 

It calls to mind, that mighty Buckingham, 

Who was your brave exalted Uncle here, 

(Binding the wheele of Fortune to his Sphere) 

Who spurn'd at Envie ; and co'd bring, with ease, 

An end to all his stately purposes. 

For his love then, whose sacred Reliques show 

Their Resurrection, and their growth in you : 

And for my sake, who ever did prefer 

You, above all Those Sweets of Westminster : 

Permit my Book to have a free accesse 

To kisse your hand, most Dainty Govemesse. 

Upon his Julia. 

Will ye heare, what I can say 
Briefly of my Julia} 
Black and rowling is her eye, 
Double chinn'd, and forehead high : 
Lips she has, all Rubie red. 
Cheeks like Creame Enclarited : 
And a nose that is the grace 
And Proscenium of her face. 
So that we may guesse by these, 
The other parts will richly please. 

To Flowers. 

In time of life, I grac't ye with my Verse ; 
Doe now your flowrie honours to my Herse. 
You shall not languish, trust me : Virgins here 
Weeping, shall make ye flourish all the yeere. 

To my ill Reader. 

Thou say'st my lines are hard ; 

And I the truth will tell ; 
They are both hard, and marr'd, 

If tbpu not read'st them well. 



Hesperides. 139 

'The power in the people. 

Let Kings Command, and doe the best they may, 
The saucie Subjects still will beare the sway. 

A Hymne to Venus, and Cupid. 

Sea-born Goddesse, let me be, 

By thy sonne thus grac't, and thee ; 

That when ere I wooe, I find 

Virgins coy, but not unkind. 

Let me when I kisse a maid, 5 

Taste her lips, so over-laid 

With Loves-sirrop ; that I may, 

In your Temple, when I pray, 

Kisse the Altar, and confess 

Ther's in love, no bitterness. 10 

On Julia's Picture. 

How am I ravisht ! When I do but see. 
The Painters art in thy Sciagraphy ? 
If so, how much more shall I dote thereon, 
When once he gives it incarnation ? 

Her Bed. 

See'st thou that Cloud as silver cleare. 
Plump, soft, & swelling every where ? 
Tis Ju/ta's Bed, and she sleeps there. 

Her Legs. 

Fain would I kiss ray Julias dainty Leg, 
Which is as white and hair-less as an egge. 

Upon her Almes. 

See how the poore do waiting stand. 
For the expansion of thy hand. 
A wafer Dol'd by thee, will swell 
Thousands to feed by miracle, 



140 Hesperides. 



Rewards. 

Still to our gains our chief respect is had ; 
Reward it is, that makes us good or bad. 



Nothing new. 

Nothing is New : we walk where others went. 
Ther's no vice now, but has his president 



'The Rainbow. 

Look, how the Rainbow doth appeare 

But in one onely Hemisphere : 

So likewise after our disseace, 

No more is seen the Arch of Peace. 

That Cov'nant's here ; The under-bow, 

That nothing shoots, but war and woe. 



The meddow verse or Aniversary to 
Mistris Bridget Lowman. 

Come with the Spring-time, forth Fair Maid, and be 

This year again, the medows Deity. 

Yet ere ye enter, give us leave to set 

Upon your Head this flowry Coronet : 

To make this neat distinction from the rest : 

You are the Prime, and Princesse of the Feast : 

To which, with silver feet lead you the way, 

While sweet-breath Nimphs, attend on you this Day. 

This is your houre ; and best you may command, 

Since you are Lady of this Fairie land. 

Full mirth wait on you ; and such mirth as shall 

Cherrish the cheek, but make none blush £it all, 



Hesperides. 141 



"The parting verse, the feast there 
ended. 

Loth to depart, but yet at last, each one 

Back must now go to's habitation : 

Not knowing thus much, when we once do sever. 

Whether or no, that we shall meet here ever. 

As for my self, since time a thousand cares 

And griefs hath fil'de upon my silver hairs ; 

'Tis to be doubted whether I next yeer, 

Or no, shall give ye a re-meeting here. 

If die I must, then my last vow shall be, 

You'l with a tear or two, remember me. 

Your sometime Poet ; but if fates do give 

Me longer date, and more fresh springs to live : 

Oft as your field, shall her old age renew, 

Herrick shall make the meddow-verse for you. 



Long and lazie. 

That was the Proverb. Let my mistresse be 
Lasie to others, but be long to me. 



'To the right honourable, Philip, Earle of Pembroke, 
and Montgomerie. 

How dull and dead are books, that cannot show 

A Prince or Pembroke, and that Pembroke, you ! 

You, who are High born, and a Lord no lesse 

Free by your fate, then Fortunes mightinesse, 

Who hug our Poems (Honourd Sir) and then 5 

The paper gild, and Laureat the pen. 

Nor suffer you the Poets to sit cold. 

But warm their wits, and turn their lines to gold. 

Others there be, who righteously will swear 

Those smooth-pac't Numbers, amble every where ; lo 

To the right honourable Fhilip, &c. 2 or] of HazHtt, Grosart, and others 
{^probably rightly) 



142 Hesperides. 



And these brave Measures go a stately trot ; 

Love those, like these ; regard, reward them not. 

But you, my Lord, are One, whose hand along 

Goes with your mouth, or do's outrun your tongue ; 

Paying before you praise ; and cockring wit, 15 

Give both the Gold and Garland unto it. 



An hymne to Juno. 

Stately Goddesse, do thou please, 
Who art chief at marriages, 
But to dresse the Bridall-Bed, 
When my Love and I shall wed : 
And a Peacock proud shall be 
Offerd up by us, to thee. 



TJpon Sapho, sweetly playing, and 
sweetly singing. 

When thou do'st play, and sweetly sing, 
Whether it be the voice or string, 
Or both of them, that do agree 
Thus to en-trance and ravish me : 
This, this I know, I'm oft struck mute ; 
And dye away upon thy Lute. 



Chop-Cherry. 

Thou gav'st me leave to kisse ; 
Thou gav'st me leave to wooe ; 
Thou mad'st me thinke by this. 
And that, thou lov'dst me too. 

But I shall ne'r forget. 
How for to make thee merry ; 
Thou mad'st me chop, but yet, 
Another snapt the Cherry. 



Hesperides. 143 

To the most learned, wise, and Arch- Anti- 
quary, M. John Selden. 

I who have favour'd many, come to be 

Grac't (now at last) or glorifi'd by thee. 

Loe, I, the Lyrick Prophet, who have set 

On many a head the Delphick Coronet, 

Come unto thee for Laurell, having spent, 5 

My wreaths on those, who Uttle gave or lent. 

Give me the Daphne, that the world may know it. 

Whom they neglected, thou hast crown'd a Poet. 

A City here of Heroes I have made. 

Upon the rock, whose firm foundation laid, lo 

Shall never shrink, where making thine abode. 

Live thou a Selden, that's a Demi-god. 



Upon himself. 

Thou shalt not All die ; for while Love's fire shines 
Upon his Altar, men shall read thy lines ; 
And learn'd Musicians shall to honour Herricks 
Fame, and his Name, both set, and sing his Lyricks. 



Upon wrinkles. 

Wrinkles no more are, or no lesse, 
Then beauty turn'd to sowernesse. 



Fray and prosper. 

First offer Incense, then thy field and meads 
Shall smile and smell the better by thy beads. 
The spangling Dew dreg'd o're the grasse shall be 
Turn'd all to Mell, and Manna there for thee. 



144 Hesperides. 



Butter of Amber, Cream, and Wine, and Oile 
Shall run, as rivers, all throughout thy soyl. 
Wod'st thou to sincere-silver turn thy mold ? 
Pray once, twice pray ; and turn thy ground to gold. 



His Lachrimne or Mirth, turn'd 
to mourning. 

1. Call me no more, 
As heretofore, 

The musick of a Feast ; 

Since now (alas) 

The mirth, that was 6 

In me, is dead or ceast. 

2. Before I went 
To banishment 

Into the loathed West ; 

I co'd rehearse lo 

A Lyrick verse, 
And speak it with the best. 

But time (Ai me) 

Has laid, I see 
My Organ fast asleep ; 15 

And turn'd my voice 

Into the noise 
Of those that sit and weep. 



Gain and Getting^. 

When others gain much by the present cast, 
The coblers getting time, is at the Last. 



Lachrimce] Lacrime 164& : corr. in orig. Errata 



Hesperides. 145 



To the most fair and lovely Mistris, 
Anne Soame, now Lady Abdie. 

So smell those odours that do rise 

From out the wealthy spiceries : 

So smels the flowre of blooming Clove ; 

Or Roses smother'd in the stove : 

So smells the Aire of spiced wine ; 5 

Or Essences o{ Jessimine : 

So smells the Breath about the hives, 

When well the work of hony thrives ; 

And all the busie Fadours come 

Laden with wax and hony home : lo 

So smell those neat and woven Bowers, 

All over-archt with Oringe flowers ; 

And Almond blossoms, that do mix 

To make rich these Aromatikes : 

So smell those bracelets, and those bands 15 

Of Amber chaf 't between the hands, 

When thus enkindled they transpire 

A noble perfume from the fire. 

The wine of cherries, and to these, 

The cooling breath of Respasses ; 20 

The smell of mornings milk, and cream ; 

Butter of Cowslips mixt with them ; 

Of rosted warden, or bak'd peare. 

These are not to be reckon'd here ; 

When as the meanest part of her, 25 

Smells like the maiden-Pomander. 

Thus sweet she smells, or what can be 

More lik'd by her, or lov'd by mee. 



146 Hesperides, 

Upon his kinswoman Mistris 
Elizabeth Herrick. 

Sweet virgin, that I do not set 

The pillars up of weeping _/«^, 

Or mournfull Marble; let thy shade 

Not wrathfull seem, or fright the Maide, 

Who hither at her wonted howers 

Shall come to strew thy earth with flowers. 

No, know (Blest Maide) when there's not one 

Remainder left of Brasse or stone, 

Thy living Epitaph shall be, 

Though lost in them, yet found in me. 

Dear, in thy bed of Roses, then. 

Till this world shall dissolve as men, 

Sleep, while we hide thee from the light. 

Drawing thy curtains round : Good night. 



A Panegerick to Sir Lewis Pemberton. 

Till I shall come again, let this suffice, 

I send my salt, my sacrifice 
To Thee, thy Lady, younglings, and as farre 

As to thy Genius and thy Larre ', 
To the worn Threshold, Porch, Hall, Parlour, Kitchin, 5 

The fat-fed smoking Temple, which in 
The wholsome savour of thy mighty Chines 

Invites to supper him who dines. 
Where laden spits, warp't with large Ribbs of Beefe, 

Not represent, but give reliefe 10 

To the lanke-Stranger, and the sowre Swain ; 

Where both may feed, and come againe : 
For no black-bearded Vigil from thy doore 

Beats with a button'd-staffe the poore : 
But from thy warm-love-hatching gates each may 15 

Take friendly morsels, and there stay 
To Sun his thin-clad members, if he likes. 

For thou no Porter keep'st who strikes. 
No commer to thy Roofe his Guest-rite wants ; 

Or staying there, is scourg'd with taunts 20 



Hesperides. 147 

Of some rough Groom, who (yirkt with Corns) sayes, Sir 

Y'ave dipt too long i'th' Vinegar ; 
And with our Broth and bread, and bits ; Sir, friend, 

Y'ave farced well, pray make an end ; 
Two dayes y'ave larded here ; a third, yee know, 25 

Makes guests and fish smell strong ; pray go 
You to some other chimney, and there take 

Essay of other giblets ; make 
Merry at anothers hearth ; y'are here 

Welcome as thunder to our beere : 30 

Manners knowes distance, and a man unrude 

Wo'd soon recoile, and not intrude 
His Stomach to a second Meale. No, no, 

Thy house, well fed and taught, can show 
No such crab'd vizard : Thou hast learnt thy Train, 35 

With heart and hand to entertain : 
And by the Armes-full (with a Brest unhid) 

As the old Race of mankind did, 
When eithers heart, and cithers hand did strive 

To be the nearer Relative : 40 

Thou do'st redeeme those times ; and what was lost 

Of antient honesty, may boast 
It keeps a growth in thee ; and so will runne 

A course in thy Fames-pledge, thy Sonne. 
Thus, like a Roman Tribune, thou thy gate 45 

Early setts ope to feast, and late : 
Keeping no currish Waiter to affright, 

With blasting eye, the appetite, 
Which fain would waste upon thy Gates, but that 

The Trencher-creature marketh what , go 

Best and more suppling piece he cuts, and by 

Some private pinch tels danger's nie 
A hand too desp'rate, or a knife that bites 

Skin deepe into the Porke, or lights 
Upon some part of Kid, as if mistooke, 55 

When checked by the Butlers look. 
No, no, thy bread, thy wine, thy jocund Beere 

Is not reserv'd for Trebius here, 
But all, who at thy table seated are, 

Find equall freedome, equall fare ; 60 

29 Merry] Grosart, Hazlitt and other modern editors read You meriy 



l^S Hesperides. 

And Thou, like to that Hospitable God, 

Jove, joy'st when guests make their abode 
To eate thy Bullocks thighs, thy Veales, thy fat 

Weathers, and never grudged at. 
The Phesant, Partridge, Gotwit, Reeve, Ruffe, Raile, 65 

The Cock, the Curlew, and the quaile ; 
These, and thy choicest viands do extend 

Their taste unto the lov^er end 
Of thy glad table : not a dish more known 

To thee, then unto any one : 70 

But as thy meate, so thy immortall wine 

Makes the smirk face of each to shine, 
And spring fresh Rose-buds, while the salt, the wit 

Flowes from the Wine, and graces it : 
While Reverence, waiting at the bashfull board, 76 

Honours my Lady and my Lord. 
No scurrile jest; no open Sceane is laid 

Here, for to make the face affraid ; 
But temp'rate mirth dealt forth, and so discreet- 
ly that it makes the meate more sweet ; 80 
And adds perfumes unto the Wine, which thou 

Do'st rather poure forth, then allow 
By cruse and measure ; thus devoting Wine, 

As the Canary Isles were thine : 
But with that wisdome, and that method, as 85 

No One that's there his guilty glasse 
Drinks of distemper, or ha's cause to cry 

Repentance to his liberty. 
No, thou know'st order, Ethicks, and ha's read 

All Oeconomicks, know'st to lead 90 

A House-dance neatly, and can'st truly show. 

How farre a Figure ought to go, 
Forward, or backward, side-ward, and what pace 

Can give, and what retract a grace ; 
What Gesture, Courtship ; Comliness agrees, 95 

With those thy primitive decrees. 
To give subsistance to thy house, and proofe, 

What (?f«/? support thy roofe, 
Goodnes and Greatnes ; not the oaken Piles ; 

jFor these, and marbles have their whiles 100 

To last, but not their ever: Vertues Hand 

It is, which builds, 'gainst Fate to stand. 



Hesperides. 149 

Such is thy house, whose firme foundations trust 

Is more in thee, then in her dust, 
Or depth, these last may yeeld, and yearly shrinke, 105 

When what is strongly built, no chinke 
Or yawning rupture can the same devoure, 

But fixt it stands, by her own power, 
And well-laid bottome, on the iron and rock. 

Which tryes, and counter-stands the shock, no 

And Ramme of time and by vexation growes 

The stronger : Vertiie dies when foes 
Are wanting to her exenise, but great 

And large she spreads by dust, and sweat 
Safe stand thy Walls, and Thee, and so both will, 115 

Since neithers height was rais'd by th'ill 
Of others ; since no Stud, no Stone, no Piece, 

Was rear'd up by the Poore-mans fleece : 
No Widowes Tenement was rackt to guild 

Or fret thy Seeling, or to build 120 

A Sweating- Closset, to annoint the silke- 

soft-skin, or bath in Asses milke : 
No Orphans pittance, left him, serv'd to set 

The Pillars up of lasting Jet, 
For which their cryes might beate against thine eares, 125 

Or in the dampe Jet read their Teares. 
No Planke from Hallmved Altar, do's appeale 

To yond' Star-chamber, or do's scale 
A curse to Thee, or Thine ; but all things even 

Make for thy peace, and pace to heaven. 130 

Go on directly so, as just men may 

A thousand times, more sweare, then say. 
This is that Princely Pemberton, who can 

Teach man to keepe a God in man : 
And when wise Poets shall search out to see 135 

Good men. They find them all in Thee. 



To his Valentine, on S. Valentines c^ay 

Oft have I heard both Youths and Virgins say. 
Birds chuse their Mates, and couple too, this day : 
But by their flight I never can divine. 
When I shall couple with my Valentine. 



150 Hesperides, 

Upon M. Ben. Johnson. Epig. 

After the rare Arch-Poet Johnson dy'd, 

The Sock grew loathsome, and the Buskins pride, 

Together with the Stages glory stood 

Each like a poore and pitied widowhood. 

The Cirque prophan'd was ; and all postures rackt : 5 

For men did strut, and stride, and stare, not act 

Then temper flew from words ; and men did squeake, 

Looke red, and blow, and bluster, but not speake : 

No Holy-Rage, or frantick-fires did stirre, 

Or flash about the spacious Theater. 10 

No clap of hands, or shout, or praises-proofe 

Did crack the Play-house sides, or cleave her roofe. 

Arllesse tke Sceane was ; and that monstrous sin 

Of deep and arrant ignorance came in ; 

Such ignorance as theirs was, who once hist 15 

At thy unequal'd Play, the Alchymist : 

Oh fie upon 'em ! Lastly too, all witt 

In utter darkenes did, and still will sit 

Sleeping the lucklesse Age out, till that she 

Her Resurrection ha's again with Thee. ao 



Another. 

Thou had'st the wreath before, now take the Tree ; 
That henceforth none be Laurel crown' d but Thee. 



To his Nephew, to he prosperous in his 
art of Fainting. 

On, as thou hast begunne, brave youth, and get 
The Palme from Urbin, Titian, Tiniarrei, 
Brugel and Coxu, and the workes out-doe, 
Of Holben, and That mighty Ruben too. 
So draw, and paint, as none may do the like 
No, not the glory of the World, Vandike. 



Hesperides. 



A Vow to Mars. 

Store of courage to me grant, 
Now I'm turn'd a combatant : 
Helpe me so, that I my shield, 
(Fighting) lose not in the field. 
That's the greatest shame of all 
That in warfare can befall. 
Do but this ; and there shall be 
OfFer'd up a Wolfe to thee. 



To his maid Prew. 

These Summer-Birds did with thy Master stay 
The times of warmth ; but then they fiew away 
Leaving their Poet (being now grown old) 
Expos'd to all the comming Winters cold. 
But thou kind Frew did'st with my Fates abide. 
As well the Winters, as the Summers Tide : 
For which thy Love, live with thy Master here, 
Not two, but all the seasons of the yeare. 



A Canticle to Apollo, 

1. Play Phmbus on thy Lute ; 
And we will, all sit mute 
By listning to thy Lire, 
That sets all eares on fire. 

2. Hark, harke, the God do's play ! 
And as he leads the way 
Through heaven, the very Spheres, 
As men, turne all to eares. 



A just man. 

A Just man's like a Rock that turnes the wroth 
Of all the raging Waves, into a froth 

To his maid Frew. ' Maid' Douce and Mdlone copies, which also read — 

master 5 fates 7 love . . master jS Not one 

A Canticle, i Poehbus Douce ap,d_ Malone^ y Speres Po^'ce 9«d Malojit 



152 Hesperides. 

Upon a hoarse Singer. 

Sing me to death ; for till thy voice be cleare, 
'Twill never please the pallate of mine eare. 

How Pansies or Heart-ease came first. 

Frollick Virgins once these were, 

Overloving, (living here :) 

Being here their ends deny'd 

Ran for Sweet-hearts mad, and dy'd. 

Love in pitie of their teares, 5 

And their losse in blooming yeares ; 

For their restlesse here-spent-houres. 

Gave them Hearts-ease turn'd to Flow'rs. 

To his peculiar friend Sir Edward Fish, 
Knight Baronet. 

Since for thy full deserts (with all the rest 

Of these chaste spirits, that are here possest 

Of Life eternall) Time has made thee one. 

For growth in this my rich Plantation : 

Live here : But know 'twas vertue, & not chance, 5 

That gave thee this so high inheritance. 

Keepe it for ever ; grounded with the good. 

Who hold fast here an endlesse lively-hood. 

Larr's portion, or the Poets part. 

At my homely Country-seat, 

I have there a little wheat ; 

Which I worke to Meale, and make 

Therewithall a Holy-cake : 

Part of which I give to Larr, 5 

Part is my peculiar. 

How Pansies or Heart-ease, &c. Heart-ease] Some copies of 164S read 
Hearts-ease : Douce and Malone copies Hart-ease 4 di'd Doiue arul Malone 

To his peculiar friend, &c. .S &] and Douce and Malone 7 forever 

Douce and Malone 8 lively-hood] lively food Douce and Malone copies 

(a misprint) Larr s portion. Title. oi'\ snA Douce and Malone 



Hesperides. 153 

Upon man. 



Man is compos'd here of a two-foid part ; 
The first of Nature, and the next of Art : 
Art presupposes Nature ; Nature shee 
Prepares the way for mans docihty. 

Liberty. 

Those ills that mortall men endure, 
So long are capable of cure, 
As they of freedome may be sure : 
But that deni'd ; a griefe, though small, 
Shakes the whole Roofe, or ruines all. 



Lots to be liked. 

Learn this of me, where e'r thy Lot doth fall ; 
Short lot, or not, to be content with all. 



Griefes. 

Jove may afford us thousands of reliefs ; 
Since man expos'd is to a world of griefs. 



The Dreame. 

By Dream I saw, one of the three 

Sisters of Fate appeare to me. 

Close to my Beds side she did stand 

Shewing me there a fire brand ; 

She told me too, as that did spend, 6 

So drew my life unto an end. 

Three quarters were consum'd of it ; 

Onely remaind a little bit, 

Which will be burnt up by and by, 

Ihexijuha weep, for I must dy. lo 

Upon man. i twofold Douce and Malone copies 4 for] to Some copies 0/164^1 
The Dreame. 10 ']v!a2i\ probably a misprint for Jnlia 



154 Hesperides. 



Clothes do but cheat and 
cousen us. 

Away with silks, away with Lawn, 
He have no Sceans, or Curtains drawn : 
Give me my Mistresse, as she is, 
Drest in her nak't simplicities : 
For as my Heart, ene so mine Eye 
Is wone with flesh, not Drapery. 



Upon Electra. 

When out of bed my Love doth spring, 

'Tis but as day a kindling: 

But when She's up and fully drest, 

'Tis then broad Day throughout the East. 



To his Booke. 

Have I not blest Thee ? Then go forth ; nor fear 

Or spice, or fish, or fire, or close-stools here. 

But with thy fair Fates leading thee. Go on 

With thy most white Predestination. 

Nor thinke these Ages that do hoarcely sing 5 

Th& farting Tanner, and familiar Xing; 

The dancing Frier, tatter'd in the bush ; 

Those monstrous lies of little Robin Mush : 

Tom Chipperfeild, and pritty-lisping Ned, 

That doted on a Maide of Gingerbred: lo 

1\i& flying Fikher, and \h& frisking Dace, 

With all the rabble of Tim- Trundells race, 

(Bred from the dung-hils, and adulterous rhimes,) 

Shall live, and thou not superlast all times ? 

No, no, thy Stars have destin'd Thee to see ij; 

The whole world die, and turn to dust with thee, 

He's greedie of his life, who will not fall. 

When as a publick ruine bears down All 



Hesperides. 155 

OfLove. 

I do not love, nor can it be 
Love will in vain spend shafts on me : 
I did this God-head once defie ; 
Since which I freeze, but cannot frie. 
Yet out alas ! the deaths the same, 
Kil'd by a frost or by a flame. 

Upon himself, 

I dislikt but even now ; 
Now I love I know not how. 
Was I idle, and that while 
Was I fier'd with a smile ? 
He too work, or pray ; and then 
I shall quite dislike agen. 



Another. 

Love he that will ; it best likes me. 
To have my neck from Loves yoke-free. 



'The mad Maids song, 

1. Good morrow to the Day so fair ; 

Good morning Sir to you : 
Good morrow to mine own torn hair 
Bedabled with the dew. 

2. Good morning to this Prim-rose too ; ; 

Good morrow to each maid ; 
That will with flowers the Tomb bestrew, 
Wherein my Love is laid. 

3. Ah woe is me, woe, woe is me, 

Alack and welladay ! n 

For pitty. Sir, find out that Bee, 
Which bore my Love away. 

The mad Maids song. 9 Ah woe . . .] Ah ! woe woe woe woe woe is me 
1648 : corr, in orig. Errata 



156 Hesperides. 



4. I'le seek him in your Bonnet brave ; 

lie seek him in your eyes ; 
Nay, now I think th'ave made his grave 15 

I'th'bed of strawburies. 

5. He seek him there ; I know, ere this. 

The cold, cold Earth doth shake him ; 
But I will go, or send a kisse 

By you. Sir, to awake him. 20 

6. Pray hurt him not ; though he be dead. 

He knowes well who do love him, 
And who with green-turfes reare his head. 
And who do rudely move him. 

7. He's soft and tender (Pray take heed) 25 

With bands of Cow-slips bind him ; 
And bring him home, but 'tis decreed, 
That I shall never find him. 

To Springs and Fountains. 

I heard ye co'd coole heat ; and came 

With hope you would allay the same : 

Thrice I have washt, but feel no cold, 

Nor find that true, which was foretold. 

Me thinks like mine, your pulses beat ; 5 

And labour with unequall heat : 

Cure, cure your selves, for I discrie, 

Ye boil with Love, as well as I. 

Upon Julia's unlacing her self. 

Tell, if thou canst, (^and truly) whence doth come 

This Camphire, Storax, Spiknard, Galbanum : 

These Musks, these Ambers, and those other smells 

(Sweet as the Veshie of the Oracles!) 

lie tell thee ; while xo.^ Julia did unlace 5 

Her silken bodies, but a breathing space : 

The passive Aire such odour then assum'd. 

As when to Jove Great Juno goes perfum'd. 

Whose pure-Immortall body doth transmit 

A scent, that fills both Heaven and Earth with it. 10 



Hesperides. 157 

To Bacchus, a Canticle. 

Whither dost thou whorry me, 

Bacchus, being full of Thee ? 

This way, that way, that way, this, 

Here, and there a fresh Love is. 

That doth like me, this doth please ; 5 

Thus a thousand Mistresses, 

I have now ; yet I alone, 

Having All, injoy not One. 



The Lawne. 

Wo'd I see Lawn, clear as the Heaven, and thin ? 
It she'd be onely in vay Julia's skin : 
Which so betrayes her blood, as we discover 
The blush of cherries, when a Lawn's cast over. 



The Frankincense. 

When my off'ring next I make. 
Be thy hand the hallowed Cake : 
And thy brest the Altar, whence 
Love may smell the Frankincense. 



To Sycamores. 

I'm sick of Love ; O let me lie 
Under your shades, to sleep or die ! 
Either is welcome ; so I have 
Or here my Bed, or here my Grave. 
Why do you sigh, and sob, and keep 
Time with the tears, that I do weep? 
Say, have ye sence, or do you prove 
What Crucifixions are in Love? 
I know ye do ; and that's the why. 
You sigh for Love, as well as I. 

T'he Frankincense. 3 brest] bed 1648 : corr. in orig. Errata 



158 Hesperides. 

A Pastorall sung to the King : Montano, 
Silvio, and Mirtillo, Shepheards. 

Mon. Bad are the times. Sil. And wors then they are we. 

Mon. Troth, bad are both ; worse fruit, and ill the tree : 

The feast of Shepheards fail. Sil. None crowns the cup 

Of Wassaile now, or sets the quintell up : 

And He, who us'd to leade the Country-round, 6 

Youthfull Mirtillo, Here he comes, Griefdrownd. 

Ambo. Lets cheer him up. Sil. Behold him weeping ripe. 

Mirt. Ah ! Amarillis, farewell mirth and pipe ; 

Since thou art gone, no more I mean to play, 

To these smooth Lawns, my mirthfull Roundelay. 10 

Dear Amarillis ! Mon. Hark ! Sil. mark : Mir. this earth 

grew sweet 
Where, Amarillis, Thou didst set thy feet. 
Ambo. Poor pittied youth ! Mir. And here the breth of kine 
And sheep, grew more sweet, by that brfeth of Thine. 
This flock of wooll, and this rich lock of hair, 15 

This ball of Cow-slips, these she gave me here. 
Sil. Words sweet as Love it self. Montano, Hark. 
Mirt. This way she came, and this way too she went ; 
How each thing smells divinely redolent ! 

Like to a field of beans, when newly blown ; 20 

Or like a medow being lately mown. 
Mont. A sweet-sad passion.— — ■ 
Mirt. In dewie-mornings when she came this way, 
Sweet Bents wode bow, to give my Love the day : 
And when at night, she folded had her sheep, as 

Daysies wo'd shut, and closing, sigh and weep. 
Besides (Ai me !) since she went hence to dwell. 
The voices Daughter nea'r spake syllable. 
But she is gone. Sil. Mirtillo, tell us whether, 
Mirt. Where she and I shall never meet together. 30 

Mont. Fore-fend it Pan, and Pales do thou please 
To give an end : Mir. To what ? Scil. such griefs as these. 
Mirt. Never, O never ! Still I may endure 
The wound I suffer, never find a cure. 

Mont. Love for thy sake will bring her to these hills 36 

And dales again : Mir. No I will languish still ; 

A Pastorall. 6 Griefdrownd] Grief drownd Z64& 



Hesperides. 159 

And all the while my part shall be to weepe ; 

And with my sighs, call home my bleating sheep : 

And in the Rind of every comely tree 

He carve thy name, and in that name kisse thee : 40 

Mont. Set with the Sunne, thy woes : Scil. The day grows old : 

And time it is our full-fed flocks to fold. 

Chor. The shades grow great j but greater growes our sorrow, 

But lets go steepe 

Our eyes in sleepe ; 45 

And meet to weepe 
To morrow. 



The Poet loves a Mistresse, but not 
to marry. 

1. I do not love to wed, 
Though I do like to wooe ; 
And for a maidenhead 

He beg, and buy it too. 

2. He praise, and He approve 6 
Those maids that never vary ; 

And fervently He love ; 
But yet I would not marry. 

3. He hug. He kisse, He play. 

And Cock-like Hens He tread : 10 

And sport it any way ; 
But in the Bridall Bed : 

4. For why ? that man is poore. 
Who hath but one of many ; 

But crown'd he is with store, 15 

That single may have any. 

5. Why then, say, what is he 
(To freedome so unknown) 
Who having two or three, 

Will be content with one ? ao 



l6o Hesperides. 



The Willow Garland. 

A willow Garland thou did'st send 
Perfum'd (last day) to me : 

Which did but only this portend, 
I was forsooke by thee. 

Since so it is ; He tell thee what, 
To morrow thou shalt see 

Me weare the Willow ; after that, 
To dye upon the Tree. 

As Beasts unto the Altars go 
With Garlands drest, so I 

Will, with my Willow-wreath also. 
Come forth and sweetly dye. 



A Hymne to Sir Clipseby Crew. 

'Twas not Lov's Dart : 
Or any blow 
Of want, or foe, 
Did wound my heart 
With an eternall smart : 

But only you, 
My sometimes known 
Companion, 
(My dearest Crew,) 
That me unkindly slew. 

May your fault dye, 
And have no name 
In Bookes of fame ; 
Or let it lye 
Forgotten now, as I. 



Mespertdes. 1 6 1 

We parted are, 
And now no more, 
As heretofore, 
By jocund Larr, 
Shall be familiar. ao 

But though we Sever 
My Crew shall see, 
That I will be 
Here faithlesse never ; 
But love my Clipseby ever. 35 



Observation. 

Who to the North, or South, doth set 
His Bed, Male children shall beget. 



Empires. 

Empires of Kings, are now, and ever were, 
(As Salust saith) co-incident to feare. 



Felicity, quick of flight. 

Every time seemes short to be. 
That's measur'd by felicity : 
But one halfe houre, that's made up here 
With griefe ; seemes longer then a yeare. 



Putrefaction. 

Putrefaction is the end 

Of all that Nature doth entend. 



Passion. 

Were there not a Matter known, 
There wo'd be no Passion. 



1 62 Hesperides. 

Jack and Jill. 

Since yafy^ 3.nd Jill both wicked be ; 
It seems a wonder unto me, 
That they no better do agree. 

Upon Parson Beanes. 

Old Parson Beanes hunts six dayes of the week, 
And on the seaventh, he has his Notes to seek. 
Six dayes he hollows so much breath away, 
That on the seaventh, he can nor preach, or pray 

The crowd and company. 

In holy meetings, there a man may be 
One of the crowd, not of the companie. 

Short and long both likes. 

This Lady's short, that Mistresse she is tall ; 
But long or short, I'm well content with all. 

Pollicie in Princes. 

That Princes may possesse a surer seat, 

'Tis fit they make no One with them too great. 

Upon the Nipples o/" Julia's Breast. 

Have ye beheld (with much delight) 

A red-Rose peeping through a white ? 

Or else a Cherrie (double grac't) 

Within a Lillie ? Center plac't ? 

Or ever mark't the pretty beam, 

A Strawberry shewes halfe drown'd in Creame ? 

Or seen rich Rubies blushing through 

A pure smooth Pearle, and Orient too ? 

So like to this, nay all the rest. 

Is each neate Niplet of her breast. 



HesperideSa 163 



To Daisies, not to shut so soone. 

1. Shut not so soon ; the dull-ey'd night 

Ha's not as yet begunne 

To make a seisure on the light, 

Or to scale up the Sun. 

2. No Marigolds yet closed are; 

No shadowes great appeare ; 
Nor doth the early Shepheards Starre 
Shine like a spangle here. 

3. Stay but till raj Julia close 

Her life-begetting eye ; 
And let the whole world then dispose 
It selfe to live or dye. 



To the little Spinners. 

Yee pretty Huswives, wo'd ye know 

The worke that I wo'd put ye to ? 

This, this it sho'd be, for to spin, 

A Lawn for me, so fine and thin. 

As it might serve me for my skin. 5 

For cruell Love ha's me so whipt. 

That of my skin, I all am stript ; 

And shall dispaire, that any art 

Can ease the rawnesse, or the smart ; 

Unlesse you skin again each part. 10 

Which mercy if you will but do, 

I call all Maids to witnesse too 

What here I promise, that no Broom 

Shall now, or ever after come 

To wrong a Spinner or her Loome. 15 

To the little Spinners. 10 Unlesse] Misprint edV 



1 64 Hesperides. 



Oberons Palace. 

After the Feast (my Shapcot) see, 

The Fairie Court I give to thee : 

Where we'le present our Oberon led 

Halfe tipsie to the Fairie Bed, 

Where Mab he finds ; who there doth lie 5 

Not without mickle majesty. 

Which, done ; and thence remov'd the light, 

We'l wish both Them and Thee, good night. 

Full as a Bee with Thyme, and Red, 

As Cherry harvest, now high fed 10 

For Lust and action ; on he'l go, 

To lye with Mab, though all say no. 

Lust ha's no eares ; He's sharpe as thorn ; 

And fretfull, carries Hay in's home, 

And lightning in his eyes ; and flings 15 

Among the Elves, (if mov'd) the stings 

Of peltish wasps ; we'l know his Guard 

Kings though tKare hated, will befear'd. 

Wine lead him on. Thus to a Grove 

(Sometimes devoted urto Love) ao 

Tinseld with Twil'ght, He, and They 

Lead by the shine of Snails ; a way 

Beat with their num'rous feet, which by 

Many a neat perplexity, 

Many a turn, and man' a crosse- aS 

Track they redeem a bank of mosse 

Spungie and swelling, and farre more 

Soft then the finest Lemster Ore. 

Mildly disparkling, like those fiers. 

Which break from the Injeweld tyres 30 

Of curious Brides ; or like those mites 

Of Candi'd dew in Moony nights. 

Upon this Convex, all the flowers 

(Nature begets by th' Sun, and showers,) 

Are to a wilde digestion brought, 35 

As if Loves Sampler here was wrought : 

Or Citherea's Ceston, which 

All with temptation doth bewitch. 



Hesperides. 165 



Sweet Aires move here ; and more divine 
Made by the breath of great-ey'd kine, 40 

Who as they lowe empearl with milk 
The four-leav'd grasse, or mosse-like silk. 
The breath of Munkies met to mix 
With Musk-flies, are th' Aromaiicks, 

Which cense this Arch ; and here and there, 45 

And farther off, and every where. 
Throughout that Brave Mosaick yard 
Those Picks or Diamonds in the Card : 
With peeps of Harts, of Club and Spade 
Are here most neatly inter-laid. 50 

Many a Counter, many a Die, 
Half rotten, and without an eye, 
Lies here abouts ; and for to pave 
The excellency of this Cave, 

Squirrils and childrens teeth late shed, 55 

Are neatly here enchequered. 
With brownest Toadsiones, and the Gum 
That shines upon the blewer Plum. 
The nails fain off by Whit-flawes : Art's 

Wise hand enchasing here those warts, 60 

Which we to others Cfrom our selves) 
Sell, and brought hither by the Elves. 
The tempting Mole, stoln from the neck 
Of the shie Virgin, seems to deck 

The holy Entrance ; where within 65 

The roome is hung with the blew skin 
Of shifted Snake : enfreez'd throughout 
With eyes of Peacocks Trains, & Trout- 
flies curious wings ; and these among 

Those silver-pence, that cut the tongue 70 

Of the red infant, neatly hung. 
The glow-wormes eyes ; the shining scales 
Of silv'rie fish ; wheat-strawes, the snailes 
Soft Candle-light; the Kitling's eyne; 

Corrupted wood ; serve here for shine. 75 

No glaring light of bold-fac't Day, 
Or other over radiant Ray 
Ransacks this roome ; but what weak beams 
Can make reflected from these jems, 

40 great-ey'd kine] Misprinted great ey'd-kine 42 mosse-like] mosse, 

like Crosart and some others {unnecessarily) 



1 6 6 Hesperides. 



And multiply ; Such is the light, 80 

But ever doubtfull Day, or night. 
By this quaint Taper-light he winds 
His Errours up ; and now he finds 
His Moon-tann'd Mab, as somewhat sick, 
And (Love knowes) tender as a chick. 85 

Upon six plump Dandillions, high- 
Rear'd, lyes her Elvish-majestie : 
Whose wooUie-bubbles seem'd to drowne 
Hir Mab-ship in obedient Downe. 

For either sheet, was spread the Caule 90 

That doth the Infants face enthrall, 
When it is born : (by some enstyl'd 
The luckie Omen of the child) 
And next to these two blankets ore- 
Cast of the finest Gossamore. 96 
And then a Rug of carded wooll, 
Which, Spunge-like drinking in the dull- 
Light of the Moon, seem'd to comply, 
Cloud-like, the daintie Deitie. 

Thus soft she lies : and over-head 100 

A Spinners circle is bespread. 
With Cob-web-curtains : from the roof 
So neatly sunck, as that no proof 
Of any tackling can declare 

What gives it hanging in the Aire. 105 

The Fringe about this, are those Threds 
Broke at the Losse of Maiden-heads : 
And all behung with these pure Pearls, 
Dropt from the eyes of ravisht Girles 

Or writhing Brides ; when, (panting) they no 

Give unto Love the straiter way. 
For Musick now ; He has the cries 
Of fained-lost- Virginities ; 
The which the Elves make to excite 

A more unconquer'd appetite. 115 

The Kings undrest ; and now upon 
The Gnats-watch-word the Elves are gone. 
And now the bed, and Mab possest 
Of this great-little-kingly-Guest. 

We'll nobly think, what's to be done, lao 

He'll do no doubt ; This flax is spun. 



Hesperides. 167 

To his peculiar friend Master Thomas 
Shapcott, Lawyer. 

I've paid Thee, what I promis'd ; that's not All ; 

Besides I give Thee here a Verse that shall 

(When hence thy Circum-mortall-part is gon) 

Arch-like, hold up, Thy Name's Inscription. 

Brave men can^t die ; whose Candid Actions are 5 

Writ in the Poets Endlesse-Kalendar : 

Whose velome, and whose volumne is the Skie, 

And the pure Starres the praising Poetrie. 

Farewell. 



To Julia in the Temple. 

Besides us two, i' th' Temple here's not one 

To make up now a Congregation. 

Let's to the Altar of perfumes then go. 

And say short Prayers ; and when we have done so, 

Then we shall see, how in a little space, 

Saints will come in to fill each Pew and Place. 



To Oenone. 

1. What Conscience, say, is it in thee 

When I a Heart had one, 
To Take away that Heart from me. 
And to retain thy own? 

2. For shame or pitty now encline 5 

To play a loving part ; 
Either to send me kindly thine, 
Or give me back my heart. 

3. Covet not both ; but if thou dost 

Resolve to part with neither ; 10 

Why ! yet to shew that thou art just, 
Take me and mine together. 



1 6 8 Hesperides. 



His weaknesse in woes. 

I cannot suffer ; And in this, my part 

Of Patience wants. Grief breaks the stoutest Heart. 



Fame makes us forward. 

To Print our Poems, the propulsive cause 
Is Fame, (the breath of popular applause.) 



jTo Groves. 

Yee silent shades, whose each tree here 

Some Relique of a Saint doth weare : 

Who for some sweet-hearts sake, did prove 

The fire, and martyrdome of love. 

Here is the Legend of those Saints 5 

Thatdi'd for love ; and their complaints : 

Their wounded hearts ; and names we find 

Encarv'd upon the Leaves and Rind. 

Give way, give way to me, who come 

Scorch't with the selfe-same martyrdome : 10 

And have deserv'd as much (Love knowes) 

As to be canoniz'd 'mongst those, 

Whose deeds, and deaths here written are 

Within your Greenie-Kalendar : 

By all those Virgins Fillets hung 15 

Upon your Boughs, and Requiems sung 

For Saints and Soules departed hence, 

(Here honour'd still with Frankincense) 

]3y all those teares that have been shed, 

As a Drink-offering, to the dead : 20 

By all those True-love-knots, that be 

With Motto's carv'd on every tree 

By sweet S. Phillis ; pitie me : 

By deare S. Iphis; and the rest. 

Of all those other Saints now blest ; 25 

Me, me, forsaken, here admit 

Among your Mirtles to be writ : 

That my poore name may have the glory 

To live remembred in your story. 



Hesperides. 169 

An 'Epitaph upon a Virgin. 

Here a solemne Fast we keepe, 

While all beauty lyes asleep 

Husht be all things ; (no noyse here) 

But the toning of a teare : 

Or a sigh of such as bring 5 

Cowslips for her covering. 



To the right gratious Prince, Lodwick, Duke 
of Richmond and Lenox. 

Of all those three-brave-brothers, fain i' th' Warre, 

(Not without glory) Noble Sir, you are. 

Despite of all concussions left the Stem 

To shoot forth Generations like to them. 

Which may be done, if (Sir) you can beget 5 

Men in their substance, not in counterfeit. 

Such Essences as those Three Brothers ; known 

Eternall by their own production. 

Of whom, from Fam's white Trumpet, This He Tell, 

Worthy their everlasting Chronicle, 10 

Never since first Bellona us'd a Shield, 

Such Three brave Brothers fell in Mars his Field. 

These were those Three Horatii Rome did boast, 

Rom's were these Three Horatii we have lost. 

One Cordelion had that Age long since ; 15 

This, Three; which Three, you make up Foure Brave Frince. 



"To Jeahusie. 

I. O Jealousie, that art 

The Canker of the heart : 

And mak'st all hell 

Where thou do'st dwell ; 

For pitie be 
No Furie, or no Fire-brand to me. 

To the right gratious Prince, Lodwick, &c. 14 were] Misprinted vthere 



I 7 o Hesperides. 

2. Farre from me He remove 
All thoughts of irksome Love : 

And turn to snow, 

Or Christall grow ; 

To keep still free 
(O ! Soul-tormenting Jealousie,) from Thee. 

To live Freely. 

Let's live in hast ; use pleasures while we may ; 
Co'd life return, 'twod never lose a day. 



His Almes. 

Here, here I live, 
And somewhat give, 
Of what I have. 
To those, who crave. 
Little or much. 
My Almnes is such : 
But if my deal 
Of Oyl and Meal 
Shall fuller grow, 
More He bestow: 
Mean time be it 
E'en but a bit, 
Or else a crum. 
The scrip hath some. 

Upon himself. 

Come, leave this loathed Country-life, and then 
Grow up to be a Roman Citizen. 
Those mites of Time, which yet remain unspent, 
Waste thou in that most Civill Government. 
Get their comportment, and the gliding tongue 
Of those mild Men, thou art to live among : 
Then being seated in that smoother Sphere, 
Decree thy everlasting Topick there. 
And to the Farm-house nere return at all ; 
Though Granges do not love thee, Cities shall. 



Hesperides. 1 7 1 

To enjoy the Time. 

While Fates permits us, let's be merry ; 
Passe all we must the fatall Ferry : 
And this our life too whirles away, 
With the Rotation of the Day. 



Upon Love. 

Love, I have broke 

Thy yoke ; 
The neck is free : 
But when I'm next 

Love vext, 
Then shackell me. 

'Tis better yet 

To fret 
The feet or hands ; 
Then to enthrall. 

Or gall 
The neck with bands. 



To the right Honourable Mildmay, Eark 
of Westmorland. 

You are a Lord, an Earle, nay more, a Man, 
Who writes sweet Numbers well as any can : 
If so, why then are not These Verses hurld, 
Like Sybels Leaves, throughout the ample world ? 
What is a Jewell if it be not set 
Forth by a Ring, or some rich Carkanet ? 
But being so ; then the beholders cry. 
See, see a Jemme (as rare as BcbIus eye.) 
Then publick praise do's runne upon the Stone, 
For a most rich, a rare, a precious One. 
Expose your jewels then unto the view^ 
That we may praise Them, or themselves prize You. 
Vertue conceaFd (with Horace you'l confesse) 
Differs not much from drowzie slothfullnesse. 



I y 2 Hesperides. 



'The Plunder. 

I am of all bereft ; 
Save but some few Beanes left, 
Whereof (at last) to make 
For me, and mine a Cake : 
Which eaten, they and I 
Will say our grace, and die 



Littlenesse no cause of Leannesse. 

One feeds on Lard, and yet is leane ; 
And I but feasting with a Beane, 
Grow fat and smooth : The reason is, 
Jove prospers my meat, more then his. 

The Jimmall Ring, or True-love-knot. 

Thou sent'st to me a True-love-knot ; but I 
Return'd a Ring of Jimmals, to imply 
Thy Love had one knot, mine a triple tye. 

The parting Verse, or charge to his supposed 
JVife when he travelled. 

Go hence, and with this parting kisse, 

Which joyns two souls, remember this ; 

Though thou beest young, kind, soft, and faire, 

And may'st draw thousands with a haire : 

Yet let these glib temptations be 

Furies to others, Friends to me. 

Looke upon all j and though on fire 

Thou set'st their hearts, let chaste desire 

Steere Thee to me ; and thinke (me gone) 

In having all, that thou hast none. 

Nor so immured wo'd I have 

Thee live, as dead and in thy grave ; 

But walke abroad, yet wisely well 

Stand for my comming, Sentinell. 

The farting Verse. 8, let] yet 164& : corr. in orig. Errata 



Hesperides. 173 

And think (as thou do'st walke the street) 15 

Me, or my shadow thou do'st meet. 

I know a thousand greedy eyes 

Will on thy Feature tirannize, 

In my short absence ; yet behold 

Them like some Picture, or some Mould 20 

Fashion'd like Thee ; which though 'tave eares 

And eyes, it neither sees or heares. 

Gifts will be sent, and Letters, which 

Are the expressions of that itch. 

And salt, which frets thy Suters ; fly 25 

Both, lest thou lose thy liberty : 

For that once lost, thou't fall to one, 

Then prostrate to a million. 

But if they wooe thee, do thou say, 

(As that chaste Queen of Ithaca 30 

Did to her suitors) this web done 

(Undone as oft as done) I'm wonne ; 

I will not urge Thee, for I know. 

Though thou art young, thou canst say no. 

And no again, and so deny, 35 

Those thy Lust-burning Incubi. 

Let them enstile Thee Fairest faire. 

The Pearle of Princes, yet despaire 

That so thou art, because thou must 

Believe, Love speaks it not, but Lust ; 40 

And this their Flatt'rie do's commend 

Thee chiefly for their pleasures end. 

I am not jealous of thy Faith, 

Or will be ; for the Axiome saith, 

He that doth suspect, do's haste 45 

A gentle mind to be unchaste. 

No, live thee to thy selfe, and keep 

Thy thoughts as cold, as is thy sleep : 

And let thy dreames be only fed 

With this, that I am in thy bed. 50 

And thou then turning in that Sphere, 

Waking shalt find me sleeping there. 

But yet if boundlesse Lust must skaile 

Thy Fortress, and will needs prevaile ; 

<f5 doth suspect] doth still suspect Some copies of 1648 



174 Hesperides. 



And wildly force a passage in, 55 

Banish consent, and 'tis no sinne 

Of Thine ; so Lucrece fell, and the 

Chaste Syracusian Cyane. 

So Medullina fell, yet none 

Of these had imputation 60 

For the least trespasse ; 'cause the mind 

Here was not with the act combin'd. 

The body sins not, 'tis the Will 

That makes the Action, good, or ill. 

And if thy fall sho'd this way come, 65 

Triumph in such a Martirdome. 

I will not over-long enlarge 

To thee, this my religious charge. 

Take this compression, so by this 

Means, I shall know what other kisse 70 

Is mixt with mine ; and truly know, 

Returning, if 't be mine or no : 

Keepe it till then ; and now my Spouse, 

For my wisht safety pay thy vowes, 

And prayers to Venus ; if it please 75 

The Great-blew-ruler of the seas ; 

Not many full-fac't-moons shall waine, 

Lean-horn'd, before I come again 

As one triumphant ; when I find 

In thee, all faith of Woman-kind. 80 

Nor wo'd I have thee thinke, that Thou 

Had'st power thy selfe to keep this vow ; 

But having scapt temptations shelfe, 

Know vertue taught thee, not thy selfe. 



To his Kinsman^ Sir Tho. Soame. 

Seeing thee Soame, I see a Goodly man, 

And in that Good, a great Patrician. 

Next to which Two ; among the City-Powers, 

And Thrones, thy selfe one of Those Senatours : 

Not wearing Purple only for the show ; 

(As many Conscripts of the Citie do) 

But for True Service, worthy of that Gowne, 

The Golden chain too, and the Civick Crown. 



Hesperides. 175 



To Blossoms. 

Faire pledges of a fruitfull Tree, 

Why do yee fall so fast ? 

Your date is not so past ; 
But you may stay yet here a while, 

To blush and gently smile ; 5 

And go at last. 

What, were yee borne to be 

An houre or half's delight ; 

And so to bid goodnight? 
'Twas pitie Nature brought yee forth 10 

Meerly to shew your worth, 
And lose you quite. 

But you are lovely Leaves, where we 

May read how soon things have 

Their end, though ne'r so brave : 15 

And after they have shown their pride, 

Like you a while : They glide 
Into the Grave. 



Mans dying-place uncertain. 

Man knowes where first he ships himselfe ; but he 
Never can tellj where shall his Landing be. 



Nothing Free-cost. 

Nothing comes Free-cost here ; Jove will not let 
His gifts go from him ; if not bought with sweat. 



Few fortunate. 

Many we are, and yet but few possesse 
Those Fields of everlasting happinesse. 



176 Hesperides, 



To Perenna. 

How long, Perenna, wilt thou see 
Me languish for the love of Thee ? 
Consent and play a friendly part 
To save ; when thou may'st kill a heart. 

To the Ladyes. 

Trust me Ladies, I will do 
Nothing to distemper you ; 
If I any fret or vex, 
Men they shall be, not your sex. 

The old Wives Prayer. 

Holy-Rood come forth and shield 
Us i'th' Citie, and the Field : 
Safely guard us, now and aye, 
From the blast that burns by day ; 
And those sounds that us affright 
In the dead of dampish night. 
Drive all hurtful! Feinds us fro, 
By the Time the Cocks first crow. 

Upon his departure hence. 

Thus I 
Passe by, 
And die : 
As One, 
Unknown, 
And gon : 
I'm made 
A shade. 
And laid 
I'th grave. 
There have 
My Cave. 
Where tell 
I dwell. 
Farewell. 



Hesperides. 177 



The Wassaik. 

. Give way, give way ye Gates, and win 
An easie blessing to your Bin, 
And Basket, by our entring in. 

2. May both with manchet stand repleat ; 

Your Larders too so hung with meat, 5 

That though a thousand, thousand eat ; 

3. Yet, ere twelve Moones shall whirl about 
Their silv'rie Spheres, ther's none may doubt, 
But more's sent in, then was serv'd out. 

4. Next, may your Dairies Prosper so, 10 
As that your pans no Ebbe may know ; 

But if they do, the more to flow. 

5. Like to a solemne sober Stream 
Bankt all with Lillies, and the Cream 

Of sweetest Cow-slips filling Them. 15 

6. Then, may your Plants be prest with Fruit, 
Nor Bee, or Hive you have be mute ; 

But sweetly sounding like a Lute. 

7. Next may your Duck and teeming Hen 

Both to the Cocks-tread say Amen ; so 

And for their two egs render ten. 

8. Last, may your Harrows, Shares and Ploughes, 
Your Stacks, your Stocks, your sweetest Mowes, 
All prosper by your Virgin-vowes. 

9. Alas ! we blesse, but see none here, as 
That brings us either Ale or Beere ; 

In a drie-house all things are neere. 

10. Let's leave a longer time to wait, 

Where Rust and Cobwebs bind the gate ; 

And all live here with needy Fate. 30 

17 yon] ye Some copies 0/1648 24 your] our Some copies 0/1648 



178 Hesperides. 

11. Where Chimneys do for ever weepe, 

For want of warmth, and Stomachs keepe 
With noise, the servants eyes from sleep. 

12. It is in vain to sing, or sta;y 

Our free-feet here ; but we'l away : 35 

Yet to the Lares this we'l say, 

13. The time will come, when you'l be sad, 
And reckon this for fortune bad, 
T'ave lost the good ye might have had. 

Upon a Lady f aire, but fruitlesse. 

Twice has Pudica been a Bride, and led 

By holy Himen to the Nuptiall Bed. 

Two Youths sha's known, thrice two, and twice 3. yeares ; 

Yet not a Lillie from the Bed appeares ; 

Nor will ; for why, Pudica, this may know, 5 

Trees never beare, unlesse they first do blow. 

How Springs came first. 

These Springs were Maidens once that lov'd. 

But lost to that they most approv'd : 

My Story tells, by Love they were 

Turn'd to these Springs, which wee see here : 

The pretty whimpering that they make, 6 

When of the Banks their leave they take ; 

Tels ye but this, they are the same. 

In nothing chang'd but in their name. 

To Rosemary and Baies. 

My wooing's ended : now my wedding's neere ; 
When Gloves are giving, Guilded be you there. 

Upon a Scarre in a Virgins Face. 

'Tis Heresie in others : In your face 

That Scarr's no Schisme, but the sign of grace. 

31-33 omitted in some copies of 164S, with the exception of the initial word 
Where 



Hesperides. 179 

Upon his eye-sight failing him. 

I beginne to waine in sight ; 
Shortly I shall bid goodnight : 
Then no gazing more about, 
When the Tapers once are out. 



To his worthy Friend, M. Tho. Falconbirge. 

Stand with thy Graces forth, Brave man, and rise 

High with thine own Auspitious Destinies : 

Nor leave the search, and proofe, till Thou canst find 

These, or those ends, to which Thou wast design'd. 

Thy lucky Genius, and thy guiding Starre, 5 

Have made Thee prosperous in thy wayes, thus farre : 

Nor will they leave Thee, till they both have shown 

Thee to the World a Prime and Publique One. 

Then, when Thou see'st thine Age all turn'd to gold. 

Remember what thy Herrick Thee foretold, 10 

When at the holy Threshold of -thine house, 

He Boded good-luck to thy Selfe and Spouse. 

Lastly, be mindfull (when thou art grown great) 

That Towrs high reared dread most the lightnings threat : 

When as the humble Cottages notfeare 15 

The cleaving Bolt of]ove the Thunderer. 



Upon Julia's haire filTd with Dew. 

Dew sate on Julians haire, 

And spangled too, 
Like Leaves that laden are 

With trembling Dew : 
Or glitter'd to my sight. 

As when the Beames 
Have their reflected light, 

Daunc't by the Streames. 

To M. Tho, Falconbirge 8 Prime'] Misprinted Prime 



1 8 o Mesperides. 



Another on her. 

How can I choose but love, and follow her, 
Whose shadow smels like milder Pomander ! 
How can I chuse but kisse her, whence do's come 
The Storax, Spiknard, Myrrhe, and Ladanum. 



Losse from the least. 

Great men by small meanes oft are overthrown : 
He's Lord of thy life, who contemnes his own. 



Reward and punishments. 

All things are open to these two events, 
Or to Rewards, or else to Punishments. 



Shame, no Statist. 

Shame is a bad attendant to a State : 

He rents his Crown, Thatfeares th^ Peoples hate. 



To Sir Clisebie Crew. 

Since to th' Country first I came, 
I have lost my former flame : 
And, methinks, I not inherit, 
As I did, my ravisht spirit. 
If I write a Verse, or two, 
'Tis with very much ado ; 
In regard I want that Wine, 
Which sho'd conjure up a line. 
Yet, though now of Muse bereft 
I have still the manners left 
For to thanke you (Noble Sir) 
For those gifts you do conferre 
Upon him, who only can 
Be in Prose a gratefull man. 



Hesperides. 1 8 1 



Upon himselfe. 

1. I co'd never love indeed; 
Never see mine own heart bleed : 
Never crucifie my life ; 

Or for Widow, Maid, or Wife. 

2. I co'd never seeke to please 5 
One, or many Mistresses : 

Never like their lips, to sweare 
Oyle of Roses still smelt there. 

3. I co'd never breake my sleepe. 

Fold mine Armes, sob, sigh, or weep : 10 

Never beg, or humbly wooe 

With oatlies, and lyes, (as others do.) 

4. 1 co'd never walke alone ; 
Put a shirt of sackcloth on : 

Never keep a fast, or pray 15 

For good luck in love (that day.) 

5. But have hitherto liv'd free. 
As the aire that circles me : 
And kept credit with my heart. 

Neither broke i'th whole, or part. ao 



Fresh Cheese and Cream. 

Wo'd yee have fresh Cheese and Cream ? 
Julia! s Breast can give you them : 
And if more ; Each Nipple cries, 
To your Cream, her's Strawberries. 



An Eclogue, or Pastorall between Endimion Por- 
ter and Lycidas Herrick, set and sung. 

I. Endym. Ah ! Lycidas, come tell me why 
Thy whilome merry Gate 
By thee doth so neglected lye ; 
And never purls a Note ? 



1 8 2 Hesperides, 



2. I prithee speake : Lye. I will. End. Say on : j 
Lye. 'Tis thou, and only thou, 

That art the cause Endimion ; 
End. For Loves-sake, tell me how. 

3. Lye. In this regard, that thou do'st play 

Upon an other Plain : 10 

And for a Rurall Roundelay, 

Strik'st now a Courtly strain. 

4. Thou leav'st our Hills, our Dales, our Bowers, 

Our finer fleeced sheep : 
(Unkind to us) to spend thine houres, 15 

Where Shepheards sho'd not keep. 

5. I meane the Court : Let Latmos be 

My lov'd Endymions Court ; 
End. But I the Courtly State wo'd see : 
Lye. Then see it in report. ao 

6. What ha's the Court to do with Swaines, 

Where Phillis is not known ? 
Nor do's it mind the Ruslick straines 
Of us, or Condon. 

7. Breake, if thou lov'st us, this delay ; aj 
End. Dear Lyeidas, e're long, 

I vow by Pan. to come away 

And Pipe unto thy Song. 

8. "Vci&w Jessimine, ■^'I'Ca. Florabell ; 

And dainty Amarillis, 30 

With handsome-handed Drosomell 

Shall pranke thy Hooke with Lillies. 

9. Lye. Then Tityrus, and Coridon, 

And Thyrsis, they shall follow 
With all the rest ; while thou alone 36 

Shalt lead, like young Apollo. 

to. And till thou com'st, thy Lyeidas, 

In every Geniall Cup, 
Shall write in Spice, Endimion 'twas 

That kept his Piping up. 40 

And my most liickie Swain, when I shall live to see 
Endimions Moon to fill up full, remember me : 
Mean time, let Lyeidas have leave to Pipe to thee. 



Hesperides. 183 

To a Bed of Tulips. 



1. Bright Tulips, we do know, 
You had your comming hither ; 
And Pading-time do's show. 
That Ye must quickly wither. 

2. Your Sister-hoods may stay, 
And smile here for your houre ; 
But dye ye must away : 

Even as the meanest Flower. 

3. Come Virgins then, and see 
Your frailties ; and bemone ye ; 
For lost like these, 'twill be, 
As Time had never known ye. 

A Caution. 

That Love last long ; let it thy first care be 
To find a Wife, that is most fit for Thee. 
Be She too wealthy, or too poore ; be sure. 
Love in extreames, can never long endure. 



To the Water Nymphs, drinking at the Fountain. 

1. Reach, with your whiter hands, to me. 

Some Christall of the Spring ; 
And I, about the Cup shall see 
Fresh Lillies flourishing. 

2. Or else sweet Nimphs do you but this ; 

To'th' Glasse your lips encline ; 
And I shall see by that one kisse, 
The Water turn'd to Wine. 



To his Honoured Kinsman, Sir Richard Stone. 

To this white Temple of my Heroes, here 
Beset with stately Figures (every where) 
Of such rare Saint-ships, who did here consume 
Their lives in sweets, and left in death perfume. 



184 Hesperides. 



Come thou Brave man ! And bring with Thee a Stone 5 

Unto thine own Edification. 

High are These Statues here, besides no lesse 

Strong then the Heavens for everlastingnesse ; 

Where build aloft ; and being fixt by These, 

Set up Thine own eternall Images. 10 

Upon a Flie. 

A golden Flie one shew'd to me 

Clos'd in a Box of Yvorie : 

Where both seem'd proud ; the Flie to have 

His buriall in an yvory grave : 

The yvorie tooke State to hold 5 

A Corps as bright as burnisht gold. 

One Fate had both ; both equall Grace ; 

The Buried, and the Burying-place. 

Not Virgils Gnat, to whom the Spring 

All Flowers sent to'is burying. 10 

Not Marshals Bee, which in a Bead 

Of Amber quick was buried. 

Nor that fine Worme that do's interre 

Her self i'th' silken Sepulchre. 

Nor my rare *Phil, that lately was * Sparrow. 15 

With Lillies Tomb'd up in a Glasse ; 

More honour had, then this same Flie ; 

Dead, and closed up in Yvorie. 

To Julia. 

Julia, when thy Herrick dies, 
Close thou up thy Poets eyes : 
And his last breath, let it be 
Taken in by none but Thee. 

To Mistresse Dorothy Parsons. 

If thou aske me (Deare) wherefore 
I do write of thee no more : 
I must answer (Sweet) thy part 
Lesse is here, then in my heart. 



Hesperides. 185 



How he would drinke his Wine. 

Fill me my Wine in Christall ; thus, and thus 

I see't in's/Km naturalibus : 

Unmixt. I love to have it smirke and shine, 

' Tis sin I know, 'tis sin to throtle Wine. 

What Mad-man's he, that when it sparkles so, 

Will code his flames, or quench his fires with snow ? 



How Marigolds came yellow. 

Jeaious Girles these sometimes were. 
While they liv'd, or lasted here : 
Turn'd to Flowers, still they be 
Yellow, markt for Jealousie. 

The broken Christall. 

To Fetch me Wine my Lucia went. 
Bearing a Christall continent : 
But making haste, it came to passe. 
She brake in two the purer Glasse, 
Then smil'd, and sweetly chid her speed ; 
So with a blush, beshrew'd the deed. 

Vrecepts. 

Good Precepts we must firmly hold. 
By daily Learning we wax old. 

To the right Honourable Edward Earle of 

Dorset. 

If I dare write to You, my Lord, who are, 

Of your own selfe, a Publick Theater. 

And sitting, see the wiles, wayes, walksof wit. 

And give a righteous judgement upon it. 

What need I care, though some dislike me sho'd. 

If Dorset say, what Herrick writes, is good ? 

We know y'are learn'd i'th' Muses, and no lesse 

In our State-sawtipns, deep, gr bottomlesse. 



1 8 6 Hesperides. 

Whose smile can make a Poet ; and your glance 
Dash all bad Poems out of countenance. 
So, that an Author needs no other Bayes 
For Coronation, then Your onely Praise. 
And no one mischief greater then your frown, 
To null his Numbers, and to blast his Crowne. 
JFew live the life iminortall. He ensures 
His Faints long life, who strives to set up Yours. 



Upon himself. 

Th'art hence removing, (like a Shepherds Tent) 
And walk thou must the way that others went : 
Fall thou must first, then rise to life with These, 
Markt in thy Book for faithfull Witnesses. 



Hope well and Have well : or, 
Faire after Foule weather. 

What though the Heaven be lowring now, 

And look with a contracted brow ? 

We shall discover, by and by, 

A Repurgation of the Skie : 

And when those clouds away are driven, 

Then will appeare a cheerfull Heaven. 



Upon Love. 

I . I held Love's head while it did ake ; 
But so it chanc't to be ; 
The cruell paine did his forsake, 
And forthwith came to me. 

z. Ai me ! Hov/ shal my griefe be stil'd? 
Or where else shall we find 
One like to me, who must be kill'd 
For being too-too-kind ? 



Hesperides. 187 

To his Kinswoman, Mrs. Penelope AVheeler. 

Next is your lot (Faire) to be number'd one, 
Here, in my Book's Canonization : 
Late you come in ; but you a Saint shall be. 
In Chiefe, in this Poetick Liturgie. 



Another upon her. 

First, for your shape, the curious cannot shew 

Any one part that's dissonant in you : 

And 'gainst your chast behaviour there's no Plea, 

Since you are knowne to be Penelope. 

Thus faire and cleane you are, although there be 

A mighty strife 'twixt Forme and Chastitie. 



Kissing and bussing. 

Kissing and bussing differ both in this ; 

We busse our Wantons, but our Wives we kisse. 



Crosse and Pile. 

Faire and foule dayes trip Crosse and Pile ; The faire 
Far lesse in number, then our foule dayes are. 



To the Lady Crew, upon the death 
of her Child. 

Why, Madam, will ye longer weep. 
When as your Baby's lull'd asleep ? 
And (pretty Child ) feeles now no more 
Those paines it lately felt before. 
All now is silent ; groanes are fled : 
Your Child lyes still, yet is not dead : 
But rather like a flower hid here 
To spring againe another yeare. 



1 8 S Hesperides. 

His Winding-sheet. 

Come thou, who art the Wine, and wit 

Of all I've writ : 
The Grace, the Glorie, and the best 

Piece of the rest. 
Thou art of what I did intend 5 

The All, and End. 
And what was made, was made to meet 

Thee, thee my sheet. 
Come then, and be to my chast side 

Both Bed, and Bride. lo 

We two (as Reliques left) will have 

One Rest, one Grave. 
And, hugging close, we will not feare 

Lust entring here : 
Where all Desires are dead, or cold 15 

As is the mould : 
And all Affections are forgot, 

Or Trouble not. 
Here, here the Slaves and Pris'ners be 

From Shackles free : ao 

And weeping Widowes long opprest 

Doe here find rest. 
The wronged Client ends his Lawes 

Here, and his Cause. 
Here those long suits of Chancery lie aS 

Quiet, or die : 
And all Star-chamber-Bils doe cease, 

Or hold their peace. 
Here needs no Court for our Request, 

Where all are best ; 30 

All wise ; all equall ; and all just 

Alike i'th' dust. 
Nor need we here to feare the frowne 

Of Court, or Crown. 
Where Fortune bears no sway oWe things 35 

There all are Kings. 
In this securer place we'l keep. 

As lull'd asleep ; 
Or for a little time we'l lye, 

As Robes laid by ; 40 



Hesperides. 189 

To be another day re-worne, 

Turn'd, but not torn : 
Or like old Testaments ingrost, 

Lockt up, not lost : 
And for a while lye here conceal'd, 45 

To be reveal'd 
Next, at that great Platonick yeere. 

And then meet here. 



To Mistresse Mary Willand. 

One more by Thee, Love, and Desert have sent, 
T' enspangle this expansive Firmament. 
O Flame of Beauty ! come, appeare, appeare 
A Virgin Taper, ever shining here. 



Change gives content. 

What now we like, arton we disapprove ; 
The rew successor drives away old Love. 



On himselfe. 

Borne I was to meet with Age, 
And to walke Life's pilgrimage. 
Much I know of Time is spent, 
Tell I can't, what's Resident. 
Howsoever, cares, adue; 
He have nought to say to you ; 
But He spend my comming houres, 
Drinking wine, & crown'd with flowres. 



Fortune favours. 

Fortune did never favour one 

Fully, without exception ; 

Though free she be, ther's something yet 

Still wanting to her Favourite 



190 Hesperides, 

'To Phillls to love, and live with him. 

Live, live with me, and thou shalt see 

The pleasures He prepare for thee : 

What sweets the Country can afford 

Shall blesse thy Bed, and blesse thy Board. 

The soft sweet Mosse shall be thy bed, 5 

With crawling Woodbine over-spread : 

By which the silver shedding streames 

Shall gently melt thee into dreames. 

Thy clothing next, shall be a Gowne 

Made of the Fleeces purest Downe. 10 

The tongues of Kids shall be thy meate ; 

Their Milke thy drinke ; and thou shalt eate 

The Paste of Filberts for thy bread 

With Cream of Cowslips buttered : 

Thy Feasting-Tables shall be Hills 15 

With Daisies spread, and Daffadils ; 

Where thou shalt sit, and Red-brest by. 

For meat, shall give thee melody. 

He give thee Chaines and Carkanets 

Of Primroses and Violets. ao 

A Bag and Bottle thou shalt have ; 

That richly wrought, and This as brave ; 

So that as either shall expresse 

The Wearer's no meane Shepheardesse. 

At Sheering-times, and yearely Wakes, 25 

When Themilis his pastime makes, 

There thou shalt be ; and be the wit. 

Nay more, the Feast, and grace of it. 

On Holy-dayes, when Virgins meet 

To dance the Heyes with nimble feet ; 30 

Thou shalt come forth, and then appeare 

The Queen of Roses for that yeere. 

And having danc't ('bove all the best) 

Carry the Garland from the rest. 

In Wicker-baskets Maids shal bring 35 

To thee, (my dearest Shepharling) 

The blushing Apple, bashfull Peare, 

And shame-fac't Plum, (all simp'ring there). 

Walk in the Groves, and thou shalt find 

The name of Phillis in the Rind 40 



HesperideS. 1 9 1 

Of every straight, and smooth-skin tree ; 

Where kissing that, He twice kisse thee. 

To thee a Sheep-hook I will send, 

Be-pranckt with Ribbands, to this end, 

This, this alluring Hook might be f5 

Lesse for to catch a sheep, then me. 

Thou shalt have Possets, Wassails fine, 

Not made of Ale, but spiced Wine ; 

To make thy Maids and selfe free mirth, 

All sitting neer the glitt'ring Hearth. 50 

Thou sha't have Ribbands, Roses, Rings, 

Gloves, Garters, Stockings, Shooes, and Strings 

Of winning Colours, that shall move 

Others to Lust, but me to Love. 

These (nay) and more, thine own shal be, 55 

If thou wilt love, and live with me. 



To his Kinswoman, Mistresse 
Susanna Herrick. 

When I consider (Dearest) thou dost stay 
But here awhile, to languish and decay ; 
Like to these Garden-glories, which here be 
The Flowrie-sweet resemblances of Thee : 
With griefe of heart, methinks, I thus doe cry, 
Wo'd thou hast ne'r been born, or might'st not die. 

Upon Mistresse Susanna Southwell 

her cheeks. 

Rare are thy cheeks Susanna, which do show 
Ripe Cherries smiling, while that others blow. 

Upon her Eyes. 

Cleere are her eyes, 

Like purest Skies. 
Discovering from thence 

A Babie there 

That turns each Sphere, 
Like an Intelligence. 



1 9 2 Hesperides. 

Upon her feet. 

Her pretty feet 

Like snailes did creep 
A little out, and then, 
As if they started at Bo-peep, 

Did soon draw in agen. 5 

To his honoured friend. Sir John Mynts. 

For civill, cleane, and circumcised wit, 

And for the comely carriage of it ; 

Thou art The Man, the onely Man best known, 

Markt for the True-wit of a Million : 

From whom we'l reckon. Wit came in, but since 5 

The Calculation of thy Birth, Brave Mince. 

Upon his gray haires. 

Fly me not, though I be gray, 

Lady, this I know you'l say ; 

Better look the Roses red, 

When with white commingled. 

Black your haires are ; mine are white ; e 

This begets the more delight, 

When things meet most opposite : 

As in Pictures we descry, 

Venus standing Vulcan by. 

Accusation. 

If Accusation onely can draw blood. 

None shall be guiltlesse, be he n'er so good. 

Pride allowable in Poets. 

As thou deserv'st, be proud ; then gladly let 
The Muse give thee the Delphick Coronet. 

Upon her feet. 4 started] played Douce and Malone copies 0/1648 
To his honoured friend. Title Mynts] Mince Douce and Malone coiies of 
1648. 



Hesperides. 193 



A Vow to Minerva, 

Goddesse, I begin an Art ; 

Come thou in, with thy best part, 

For to make the Texture lye 

Each way smooth and civilly : 

And a broad-fac't Owle shall be t, 

Offer'd up with Vows to Thee. 

To Electra. 

1. 'Tis Ev'ning, my Sweet, 
And dark ; let us meet ; 

Long time w'ave here been a toying : 

And never, as yet, 

That season co'd get, 5 

Wherein t'ave had an enjoying. 

2. For pitty or shame, 
Then let not Love's flame, 

Be ever and ever a spending ; 

Since now to the Port 10 

The path is but short ; 
And yet our way has no ending. 

3. Time flyes away fast ;' 
Our houres doe waste : 

The while we never remember, 15 

How soone our life, here, 

Growes old with the yeere, 
That dyes with the next December. 



'Discord not disadvantageous. 

Fortune no higher Project can devise, 
Then to sow Discord 'mongst the Enemies. 

/// Government. 

Preposterous is that Government, (and rude) 
When Kings obey the wilder Multitude. 



194 Hesperides. 

To Marygolds. 

Give way, and be ye ravisht by the Sun, 
(And hang the head when as the Act is done) 
Spread as He spreads ; wax lesse as He do's wane ; 
And as Ho shuts, close up to Maids again. 

To Dianeme. 

Give me one kisse, 

And no more ; 
If so be, this 

Makes you poore ; 
To enrich you, 5 

He restore 
For that one, two 

Thousand score. 

To Julia, the Flaminica Dialis, or Queen-Priest. 

Thou know'st, ray Julia, that it is thy turne 

This Mornings Incense to prepare, and bume. 

The Chaplet, and * Inaradum here be, 

With the white Vestures, all attending Thee. 

This day, the Queen-Priest, thou art made t'appease 5 

Love for our very-many Trespasses. 

One chiefe transgression is among the rest, 

Because with Flowers her Temple was not drest : 

The next, because her Altars did not shine 

With daily Fyers : The last, neglect of Wine : 10 

For which, her wrath is gone forth to consume 

Us all, unlesse preserv'd by thy Perfume. 

Take then thy Censer ; Put in Fire, and thus, 

O Pious- Priestres se ! make a Peace for us. 

For our neglect, Love did our Death decree, 15 

That we escape. Redemption comes by Thee. 

* A twig of a Pomgranat, which the queen-priest did use to weare on her 
head at sacrificing. (Herrick) 



Hesperides. 195 



Anacreontike. 

Born I was to be old, 

And for to die here . 
After that, in the mould 

Long for to lye here. 
But before that day conies, 

Still I be Bousing ; 
For I know, in the Tombs 

There's no Carousing. 

Meat without mirth. 

Eaten I have ; and though I had good cheere, 
I did not sup, because no friends were there. 
Where Mirth and Friends are absent when we Dine 
Or Sup, there wants the Incense and the Wine. 

Large Bounds doe but bury us. 

All things o'r-rul'd are here by Chance ; 
The greatest mans Inheritance. 
Where ere the luckie Lot doth fall, 
Serves but for place of Buriall. 

An Ode to Sir Clipseble Crew. 

1. Here we securely live, and eate 

The Creame of meat ; 
And keep eternal fires. 
By which we sit, and doe Divine 
As Wine 
And Rage inspires. 

2. If full we charme ; then call upon 

Anacreon 
To grace the f ran tick Thyrse : 
And having drunk, we raise a shout 
Throughout 
To praise his Verse. 

10 having] havink 164S: corr. in orig. Errata 



196 Hesperides. 



Then cause we Horace to be read, 
Which sung, or seyd, 
A Goblet, to the brim, ij 

Of Lyrick Wine, both swell'd and crown'd, 
A Round 
We quaffe to him. 

Thus, thus, we live, and spend the houres 

In Wine and Flowers : ao 

And make the frollick yeere. 
The Month, the Week, the instant Day 
To stay 
The longer here. 

Come then, brave Knight, and see the Cell 35 

Wherein I dwell ; 
And my Enchantments too ; 
Which Love and noble freedome is ; 
And this 
Shall fetter you. 3° 

Take Horse, and come ; or be so kind, 
To send your mind 
(Though but in Numbers few) 
And I shall think I have the heart, 

Or part 35 

Of Clipseby Crew. 



To his worthy Kinsman^ Mr. 
Stephen Soame. 

Nor is my Number full, till I inscribe 

Thee sprightly Soame, one of my righteous Tribe : 

A Tribe of one Lip ; Leven, and of One 

Civil Behaviour, and Religion. 

A Stock of Saints ; where ev'ry one doth weare 

A stole of white, (and Canonized here) 

Among which Holies, be Thou ever known, 

Brave Kinsman, markt out with the whiter stone : 

Which seals Thy Glorie ; since I doe prefer 

Tiiee here in my eternall Calender. 



Hesperides. i g 7 



To his Tomb-maker. 

Go I must ; when I am gone, 
Write but this upon my Stone ; 
Chaste I liv'd, without a wife, 
That's the Story of my life. 
Strewings need none, every flower 
Is in this word, Batchelour. 

Great Spirits supervive. 

Our mortall parts may wrapt in Seare-cloths lye : 
Great Spirits never with their bodies dye. 

None free from fault. 

Out of the world he must, who once comes in : 
No man exempted is from Death, or sinne. 

Upon himself e being buried. 

Let me sleep this night away. 
Till the Dawning of the day : 
Then at th' opening of mine eyes, 
I, and all the world shall rise. 

Vitie to the prostrate. 

Tis worse then barbarous cruelty to show 
No part of pitie on a conquer'd foe. 

His content in the Country. 

Here, here I live with what my Board, 
Can with the smallest cost afford. 
Though ne'r so mean the Viands be, 
They well content my Frew and me. 
Or Pea, or Bean, or Wort, or Beet, 
What ever comes, content makes sweet : 
Here we rejoyce, because no Rent 
We pay for our poore Tenement : 
Wherein we rest, and never feare 
The Landlord, or the Usurer. 



198 Hesperides. 



The Quarter-day do's ne'r affright 

Our Peaceful! slumbers in the night. 

We eate our own, and batten more, 

Because we feed on no mans score : 

But pitie those, whose flanks grow great, 15 

Swel'd with the Lard of others meat. 

We blesse our Fortunes, when we see 

Our own beloved privacie : 

And like our living, where w'are known 

To very few, or else to none. 20 



The credit of the Conquer er. 

He who commends the vanquisht, speaks the Power, 
And glorifies the worthy Conquerer. 



On himselfe. 

Some parts may perish ; dye thou canst not all ; 
The most of Thee shall scape the funerall. 



The Fairies. 

If ye will with Mab find grace, 

Set each Platter in his place : 

Rake the Fier up, and get 

Water in, ere Sun be set. 

Wash your Pailes, and dense your Dairies ; 

Sluts are loathsome to the Fairies : 

Sweep your house : Who doth not so, 

Mab will pinch her by the toe. 



To his honoured friend, M. John Weare, 

Councellour. 

Did I or love, or could I others draw 
To the indulgence of the rugged Law : 
The first foundation of that zeale sho'd be 
By Reading all her Paragraphs in Thee. 



Hesperides. i g 9 



Who dost so fitly with the Lawes unite, a 

As if You Two, were one Hermophrodite : 

Nor courts thou Her because she's well attended 

With wealth, but for those ends she was entended : 

Which were, (and still her offices are known) 

Law is to give to ev'ry one his owne. lo 

To shore the Feeble up, against the strong ; 

To shield the Stranger, and the Poore from wrong : 

This was the Founders grave and good intent. 

To keepe the out-cast in his Tenement : 

To free the Orphan from that Wolfe-like-man, 15 

Who is his Butcher more then Guardian. 

To drye the Widowes teares ; and stop her Swoones, 

By pouring Balme and Oyle into her wounds. 

This was the old way ; and 'tis yet thy course. 

To keep those pious Principles in force. ao 

Modest I will be ; but one word He say 

(Like to a sound that's vanishing away) 

Sooner the in-side of thy hand shall grow 

Hisped, and hairie, ere thy Palm shall know 

A Postern-bribe tooke, or a Forked- Fee 35 

To fetter Justice, when She might be free. 

Eggs Ik not shave : But yet brave man, if I 

Was destin'd forth to golden Soveraignty : 

A Prince I'de be, that I might Thee preferre 

To be my Counsell both, and Chanceller, 30 



The Watch. 

Man is a Watch, wound up at first, but never 
Wound up again : Once down. He's down for ever. 
The Watch once downe, all motions then do cease ; 
And Mans Pulse stopt. All Passions sleep in Peace. 



Lines have their Linings, and Bookes their 
Buckram. 

As in our clothes, so likewise he who lookes. 
Shall find much farcing Buckram in our Books. 



2 o o Hesperides. 

Art above Nature, to Julia. 

When I behold a Forrest spread 

With silken trees upon thy head ; 

And when I see that other Dresse 

Of flowers set in comlinesse : 

When I behold another grace 5 

In the ascent of curious Lace, 

Which like a Pinacle doth shew 

The top, and the top-gallant too. 

Then, when I see thy Tresses bound 

Into an Ovall, square, or round ; lo 

And knit in knots far more then I 

Can tell by tongue ; or true-love tie : 

Next, when those Lawnie Filmes I see 

Play with a wild civility : 

And all those airie silks to flow, le 

Alluring me, and tempting so : 

I must confesse, mine eye and heart 

Dotes less on Nature, then on Art 



Upon his kinswoman Mistresse Bridget Herrick. 

Sweet Bridget blusht, & therewithall, 
Fresh blossoms from her cheekes did fall. 
I thought at first 'twas but a dream. 
Till after I had handled them ; 
And smelt them, then they smelt to me. 
As Blossomes of the Almond Tree. 



Upon Love. 

1. I plaid with Love, as with the fire 

The wanton Satyre did ; 
Nor did I know, or co'd descry 

What under there was hid. 

2. That Satyre he but burnt his lips ; 

(But min's the greater smart) 
For kissing Loves dissembling chips, 
The fire scortcht my heart. 



Hesperides. 2 o i 

Upon a comely^ and curious Maide. 

If Men can say that beauty dyes ; 

Marbles will sweare that here it lyes. 

If Reader then thou canst forbeare, 

In publique loss to shed a Teare : 

The Dew of griefe upon this stone S 

Will tell thee Pitie thou hast none. 

Upon the losse of his Finger. 

One of the five stifaight branches of my hand 
Is lopt already ; and the rest but stand 
Expecting when to fall : which soon will be ; 
First dyes the Leafe, the Bough next, next the Tree. 

Upon Irene. 

Angry if Irene be 

But a Minutes life with me : 

Such a fire I espie 

Walking in and out her eye, 

As at once I freeze, and frie. 5 

Upon Electra's 'Teares. 

Upon her cheekes she wept, and from those showers 
Sprang up a sweet Nativity of Flowres. 

A Hymne to the Graces. 

When I love, (as some have told. 

Love I shall when I am old) 

O ye Graces ! Make me fit 

For the welcoming of it. 

Clean my Roomes, as Temples be, 5 

T' entertain that Deity. 

Give me words wherewith to wooe. 

Suppling and successefull too : 

Winning postures ; and withall, 

Manners each way musicall : lo 

Sweetnesse to allay my sowre 

And unsmooth behaviour. 



2 o 2 Hesperides. 

For I know you have the skill 
Vines to prune, though not to kill, 
And of any wood ye see, 
You can make a Mercury. 



To Silvia. 

No more my Silvia, do I mean to pray 

For those good dayes that ne'r will come away. 

I want beliefe ; O gentle Silvia, be 

The patient Saint, and send up vowes for me. 



The Poet hath lost his pipe. 

I cannot pipe as I was wont to do, 
Broke is my Reed, hoarse is my singing too : 
My wearied Oat He hang upon the Tree, 
And sive it to the Silvan Deiiie. 



True Friendship. 

Wilt thou my true Friend be ? 
Then love not mine, but me. 



The Apparition of his Mistresse 
calling him to Elizium. 

Desunt nonnulla 

Come then, and like two Doves with silv'rie wings, 
Let our soules flie to' th' shades, where ever springs 
Sit smiling in the Meads ; where Balme and Oile, 
Roses and Cassia crown the untill'd soyle. 
Where no disease raignes, or infection comes 
To blast the Aire, but Amber-greece and Gums. 



Hesperides. 203 



This, that, and ev'ry Thicket doth transpire 

More sweet, then Storax from the hallowed fire : 

Where ev'ry tree a wealthy issue beares 

Of fragrant Apples, blushing Plums, or Peares : lo 

And all the shrubs, with sparkling spangles, shew 

Like Mornlng-Sun-shine tinsilling the dew. 

Here in green Meddowes sits eternall May, 

Purfling the Margents, while perpetuall Day 

So double gilds the Aire, as that no night 15 

Can ever rust th'Enamel of the light. 

Here, naked Younglings, handsome Striplings run 

Their Goales for Virgins kisses ; which when done, 

Then unto Dancing forth the learned Round 

Commixt they meet, with endlesse Roses crown'd. 20 

And here we'l sit on Primrose-banks, and see 

Love's Chorus led by Cupid ; and we'l be 

Two loving followers too unto the Grove, 

Where Poets sing the stories of our love. 

There thou shalt hear Divine Musmus sing 25 

Of Hero, and Leander ; then He bring 

Thee to the Stand, where honour'd HoTner reades 

His Odisees, and his high Iliads. 

About whose Throne the crowd of Poets throng 

To heare the incantation of his tongue : 30 

To Linus, then to Pindar; and that done, 

He bring thee Herrick to Anacreon, 

Quaffing his full-crown'd bowles of burning Wine, 

And in his Raptures speaking Lines of Thine, 

Like to His subject ; and as his Frantick- 36 

Looks, shew him truly Bacchanalian like, 

Besmear'd with Grapes ; welcome he shall thee thither, 

Where both may rage, both drink and dance together. 

Then stately Virgil, witty Ovid, by 

Whom faire Corinna sits, and doth comply 4° 

With Yvorie wrists, his Laureat head, and steeps 

His eye in dew of kisses, while he sleeps. 

Then soft Catullus, sharp-fang'd Martial, 

And towring Lucan, Horace, Juvenal, 

And Snakie Perseus, these, and those, whom Rage 45 

(Dropt for the jarres of heaven) fill'd t'engage 

All times unto their frenzies ; Thou shalt there 

Behold thero in a spacious Theater. 



2 ©4 Hesperides. 



Among which glories, (crown'd with sacred Bayes, 

And flatt'ring Ivie) Two recite their Plaies, 50 

Beumont and Fletcher, Swans, to whom all eares 

Listen, while they (like Syrens in their Spheres) 

Sing their Evadne ; and still more for thee 

There yet remaines to know, then thou can'st see 

By glim'ring of a fancie : Doe but come, 55 

And there lie shew thee that capacious roome 

In which thy Y^.'Ca.&c Johnson now is plac't, 

As in a Globe of Radiant fire, and grac't 

To be in that Orbe crown'd (that doth include 

Those Prophets of the former Magnitude) 60 

And he one chiefe ; But harke, I heare the Cock, 

(The Bell-man of the night) proclaime the clock 

Of late struck one ; and now I see the prime 

Of Day break from the pregnant East, 'tis time 

I vanish ; more I had to say ; 65 

But Night determines here, Away. 



Life is the Bodies Light. 

Life is the Bodies light ; which once declining, 

Those crimson clouds i'th'cheeks & lips leave shining. 

Those counter-changed Tabbies in the ayre, 

(The Sun once set) all of one colour are. 

So, when Death comes, Fresh tinctures lose their place, 

And dismall Darknesse then doth smutch the face. 



Tjove lightly pleased. 

Let faire or foule my Mistresse be. 
Or low, or tall, she pleaseth me : 
Or let her walk, or stand, or sit, 
The posture hers, I'm pleas'd with it. 
Or let her tongue be still, or stir, 
Gracefull is ev'ry thing from her. 
Or let her Grant, or else Deny, 
My Love will fit each Historie. 



Hesperides. 205 



The Primrose. 

Aske me why I send you here 
This sweet Infanta of the yeere ? 

Aske me why I send to you 
This Primrose, thus bepearl'd with dew ? 

I will whisper to your eares, 
The sweets of Love are mixt with tears. 

Ask me why this flower do's show 
So yellow-green, and sickly too ? 

Ask me why the stalk is weak 
And bending, (yet it doth not break ?) 

I will answer, These discover 
What fainting hopes are in a Lover. 



The Tythe. To the Bride. 

If nine times you your Bride-groome kisse ; 
The tenth you know the Parsons is. 
Pay then your Tythe ; and doing thus. 
Prove in your Bride-bed numerous. 
If children you have ten, 'Sax John 
Won't for his tenth part ask you one. 



A Frolick. 

Bring me my Rose-buds, Drawer come j 
So, while I thus sit crown'd ; 

He drink the aged Cecubum, 

Untill the roofe turne round. 



Change common to all. 

All things subjected are to Fate ; 
Whom this Morne sees most fortunate, 
The Ev'ning sees in poore estate. 



2o6 Hesperides. 

To Julia. 

The Saints-bell calls ; and, Julia, I must read 
The Proper Lessons for the Saints now dead : 
To grace which Service, Julia, there shall be 
One Holy Collect, said or sung for Thee. 
Dead when thou art, Desxe Julia, thou shalt have 
A Tentrall sung by Virgins o're thy Grave : 
Meane time we two will sing the Dirge of these ; 
Who dead, deserve our best remembrances. 



No luck in hove. • 

1. I doe love I know not what; 
Sometimes this, & sometimes that : 
All conditions I aime at. 

2. But, as lucklesse, I have yet 
Many shrewd disasters met, 
To gaine her whom I wo'd get. 

3. Therefore now He love no more, 
As I've doted heretofore : 

He who must be, shall be poore. 



In the darke none dainty. 

Night hides our thefts ; all faults then pardon'd be : 

All are alike faire, when no spots we see. 

Lais and Lucrece, in the night time are 

Pleasing alike ; alike both singular : 

Jone, and my Lady have at that time one, 5 

One and the selfe-same priz'd complexion. 

Then please alike the Pewter and the Plate ; 

The chosen Ruble, and the Reprobate. 

To Julia. 6 Tentrall] A misprint, it seems, fnr Trentall, which I's Herrick's 
usual spelling of the word; cf. On himselfe, 1. 8 (^p. 225), and Ihe l-unerall 
Kites of Hie kose, 1. 10 (p. 233) 



Hesperides. 207 



A charme, or an allay for Love, 

If so be a Toad be laid 
In a Sheeps-skin newly flaid, 
And that ty'd to man 'twil sever 
Him and his affections ever. 



To his Brother in Law Master John Wingfield 

For being comely, consonant, and free 
To most of men, but most of all to me : 
For so decreeing, that thy clothes expence 
Keepes still within a just circumference : 
Then for contriving so to loade thy Board, 
As that the Messes ne'r o'r-laid the Lord : 
Next for Ordaining, that thy words not swell 
To any one unsober syllable. 
These I co'd praise thee for beyond another, 
Wert thou a Winckfield onely, not a Brother, 



The Head-ake. 

I. My head doth ake, 
O Sappho \ take 

Thy fillit, 
And bind the paine ; 
Or bring some bane 

To kill it. 

a. But lesse that part. 
Then my poore heart, 

Now is sick : 
One kisse from thee 
Will counsell be, 

And Physick, 



2o8 Hesperides. 

On himselfe. 

Live by thy Muse thou shalt ; when others die 
Leaving no Fame to long Posterity : 
When Monarchies trans-shifted are, and gone 
Here shall endure thy vast Dominion. 



Upon a Maide. 

Hence a blessed soule is fled, 
Leaving here the body dead : 
Which (since here they can't combine) 
For the Saint, we'l keep the Shrine. 



Upon the troublesome times. 

1. O ! Times most bad, 
Without the scope 

Of hope 
Of better to be had ! 

2. Where shall I goe, 5 
Or whither run 

To shun 
This publique overthrow? 

3. No places are 

(This I am sure) 10 

Secure 
In this our wasting Warre. 

4. Some storms w'ave past ; 
Yet we must all 

Down fall, 15 

And perish at the last. 



Cruelty base in Commanders. 

Nothing can be more loathsome, then to see 
Power conjoyn'd with Natures Crueltie. 



Hesperides. 209 



Upon Lucia. 

I askt my Lucia but a kisse ; 
And she with scorne deny'd me this : 
Say then, how ill sho'd I have sped, 
Had I then askt her Maidenhead ? 



Little and loud. 

Little you are ; for Wonians sake be proud ; 
For my sake next, (though little) be not loud. 



Ship-wrack. 

He, who has suffer'd Ship-wrack, feares to saile 
Upon the Seas, though with a gentle gale. 



Paines without profit. 

A long-lifes-day I've taken paines 
For very little, or no gaines : 
The Ev'ning's come ; here now lie stop. 
And work no more j but shut up Shop. 



To his Booke. 

Be bold my Booke, nor be abasht, or feare 
The cutting Thumb-naile, or the Brow severe. 
But by the Muses sweare, all here is good, 
If but well read ; or ill read, understood. 



His Prayer to Ben. Johnson. 

When I a Verse shall make. 
Know I have praid thee, 
For old Religions sake, 
Saint Ben to aide me. 



^16 Mesperides. 

2, Make the way smooth for me, 
When I, thy Herrick, 
Honouring thee, on my knee 
Offer my Lyrick. 

3. Candles He give to thee. 
And a new Altar ; 

And thou Saint Ben, shalt be 
Writ in my Psalter. 



Poverty and Riches. 

Give Want her welcome if she comes ; we find, 
Riches to be but burthens to the mind. 



Again. 

Who with a little cannot be content, 
Endures an everlasting punishment. 



The Covetous still Captives. 

Let's live with that smal pittance that we have ; 
Who covets more, is evermore a slave. 



Lawes. 

When Lawes full power have to sway, we see 
Little or no part there of Tyrannic. 



Of Love. 

He get me hence. 

Because no fence. 
Or Fort that I can make here 

But Love by charmes, 

Or else by Armes 
Will storme, or starving take here. 



Mesperides. :3 1 1 



To his Muse. 

Go wooe young Charles no more to looke. 
Then but to read this in my Booke : 
How Herrick beggs, if that he can- 
Not like the Muse ; to love the man, 
Who by the Shepheards, sung (long since) 
The Starre-led-birth of Charles the Prince. 



The bad season makes the Poet sad. 

Dull to my selfe, and almost dead to these 
My many fresh and fragrant Mistresses : 
Lost to all Musick now ; since every thing 
Puts on the semblance here of sorrowing. 
Sick is the Land to'th' heart ; and doth endure 
More dangerous faintings by her desp'rate cure. 
But if that golden Age wo'd come again, 
And Charles here Rule, as he before did Raign; 
If smooth and unperplext the Seasons were. 
As when the Szveet Maria lived here : 
I sho'd delight to have my Curies halfe drown'd 
In Tyrian JDewes, and Head with Roses crown'd. 
And once more yet (ere I am laid out dead) 
Knock at a Starre with my exalted Head. 



To Vulcan. 

Thy sooty Godhead, I desire 
Still to be ready with thy fire: 
That sho'd my Booke despised be, 
Acceptance it might find of thee. 



Like Pattern^ like People. 

This is the height of Justice, that to doe 
Thy selfe, which thou pufst other men unto. 
As great men lead ; the meaner follow on. 
Or to the good, or evill action. 



212 Hesperides. 



Purposes. 

No wrath of Men, or rage of Seas 
Can shake a just mans purposes : 
No threats of Tyrants, or the Grim 
Visage of them can alter him ; 
But what he doth at first entend, 
That he holds firmly to the end. 



To the Maids to zvalke abroad. 

Come sit we under yonder Tree, 

Where merry as the Maids we'l be. 

And as on Primroses we sit, 

We'l venter (if we can) aX. wit : 

If not, at Draw-gloves we will play ; 5 

So spend some minutes of the day : 

Or else spin out the thread of sands. 

Playing at Questions and Commands : 

Or tell what strange Tricks Love can do, 

By quickly making one of two. 10 

Thus we will sit and talke ; but tell 

No cruell truths of Philomell, 

Or Phyllis, whom hard Fate forc't on, 

To kill her selfe for Demophon. 

But Fables we'l relate ; hovf Jove 15 

Put on all shapes to get a Love : 

As now a Satyr, then a Swan ; 

A Pull but then ; and now a man. 

Next we will act, how young men wooe , 

And sigh, and kiss, as Lovers do : 30 

And talke of Brides ; & who shall make 

That wedding-smock, this Bridal-Cake ; 

That Dress, this Sprig, that Leaf, this Vine ; 

That smooth and silken Columbine. 

This done, we'l draw lots, who shall buy 25 

And guild the Baies and Rosemary : 

To the Maids :o walks abroad. 14 for] from some copies 0/1648 



Hesperides. 213 

What Posies for our Wedding Rings ; 

What Gloves we'l give, and Ribanings : 

And smiling at our selves, decree. 

Who then the joyning Priest shall be. 30 

What short sweet Prayers shall be said ; 

And how the Posset shall be made 

With Cream of Lillies (not of Kine) 

And Maidetf s-blush, for spiced wine. 

Thus, having talkt, we'l next commend 35 

A kiss to each ; and so we'l end. 



His own Epitaph. 

As wearied Pilgrims, once possest 
Of long'd-for lodging, go to rest : 
So I, now having rid my way ; 
Fix here my Button'd Staffe and stay. 
Youth (I confess) hath me mis-led ; 
But Age hath brought me right to Bed. 



A NupUall Verse to Mistresse Elizabeth Lee, 
now Lady Tracie. 

Spring with the Larke, most comely Bride, and meet 

Your eager Bridegroome with auspitious feet. 

The Morn's farre spent ; and the immortall Sunne 

Corrols his cheeke, to see those Rites not done. 

Fie, Lovely maid ! Indeed you are too slow, 5 

When to the Temple Love sho'd runne, not go. 

Dispatch your dressing then ; and quickly wed : 

Then feast, and coy't a little ; then to bed. 

This day is Loves day ; and this busie night 

Is yours, in which you challeng'd are to fight 10 

With such an arm'd, but such an easie Foe, 

As will if you yeeld, lye down conquer'd too. 

The Field is pitcht ; but such must be your warres. 

As that your kisses must out-vie the Starres. 

Fall down together vanquisht both, and lye if 

Drown'd in the bloud of Rubies there, not die. 



214 Hesperides 

The Night-piece, to Julia. 

r. Her Eyes the Glow-worme lend thee^ 
The Shooting Starres attend thee 

And the Elves also, 

Whose little eyes glow, 
Like the sparks of fire, befriend thee. 5 

2. No Will-dtM-Wispe mis-light thee ; 
Nor Snake, or Slow-worrae bite thee : 

But on, on thy way 
Not making a stay, 
Since Ghost ther's none to affright thee. 10 

3. Let not the darke thee cumber ; 
What though the Moon do's slumber ? 

The Starres of the night 
Will lend thee their light, 
Like Tapers cleare without number. 15 

4. Then Julia let me wooe thee, 
Thus, thus to come unto me : 

And when I shall meet 
Thy silv'ry feet. 
My soule He poure into thee. ao 



To Sir Clipseby Crew. 

Give me wine, and give me meate, 

To create in me a heate, 

That my pulses high may beate. 

Cold and hunger never yet 
Co'd a noble Verse beget ; 
But your Boules with Sack repleat. 

Give me these (my Knight) and try 
In a Minutes space how I 
Can runne mad, and Prophesie. 

Then if any Peece proves new, 
And rare, He say (my dearest Crew) 
It was full enspir'd by you. 



Mesperides, 215 

Good Luck not lasting. 

If well the Dice runne, lets applaud the cast : 
The happy fortune will not alwayes last. 

A Kisse. 

What is a Kisse ? Why this, as some approve ; 
The sure sweet-Sement, Glue, and Lime of Love. 

G/orie. 

I make no haste to have my Numbers read. 
Seldome comes Glorie till a man be dead. 

Poets. 

Wantons we are ; and though our words be such, 
Our Lives do differ from our Lines by much. 

No despight to the dead. 

Reproach we may the living ; not the dead : 
'Tis cowardice to bite the buried. 

To his Verses. 

What will ye (my poor Orphans) do 

When I must leave the World (and you) 

Who'l give ye then a sheltring shed, 

Or credit ye, when I am dead ? 

Who'l let ye by their fire sit ? 5 

Although ye have a stock of wit, 

Already coin'd to pay for it. 

I cannot tell ; unlesse there be 

Some Race of old humanitie 

Left (of the large heart, and long hand) 10 

Alive, as Noble IVestmorland ; 

Or gallant Newark ; which brave two 

May fost'ring fathers be to you. 

If not ; expect to be no less 

111 us'd, then Babes left fatherless. 15 



2 1 6 Hesperides. 



His charge to Julia at his death. 

Dearest of thousands, now the time drawes neere, 
That with my Lines, my Life must full-stop here. 
Cut off thy haires ; and let thy Teares be shed 
Over my Turfe, when I am buried. 
Then for effusions, let none wanting be, 
Or other Rites that doe belong to me ; 
As Love shall helpe thee, when thou do'st go hence 
Unto thy everlasting residence. 



Upon Love. 

In a Dreame, Love bad me go 
To the Gallies there to Rowe ; 
In the Vision I askt, why ? 
Love as briefly did reply ; 
'Twas better there to toyle, then prove 
The turmoiles they endure that love. 
I awoke, and then I knew 
What Love said was too too true : 
Henceforth therefore I will be 
As from Love, from trouble free. 
None pities him tliats in the snare. 
And warn'd before, wo'd not beware. 



'The Coblers Catch. 

Come sit we by the fires side ; 

And roundly drinke we here ; 
Till that we see our cheekes Ale-dy'd 

And noses tann'd with Beere. 



Hesperides. 2 1 *? 

Coiinubii Flores, or the well-iviskes at Weddings. 
Chorus Sacerdotum. 

1. From the Temple to your home 
May a thousand blessings come ! 
And a sweet concurring stream 
Of all joyes, to joyn with them. 

Chorus Juvenum. 

2. Happy day 5 
Make no long stay 

Here 
In thy Sphere ; 
But give thy place to night, 

That she, lo 

As Thee, 

May be 
Partaker of this sight. 
And since it was thy care 

To see the Younglings wed ; 15 

'Tis fit that Night, the Paire, 
Sho'd see safe brought to Bed. 

Chorus Senum. 

3. Go to your banquet then, but use delight, 
So as to rise still with an appetite. 

Love is a thing most nice ; and must be fed 20 

To such a height ; but never surfeited. 

AVhat is beyond the mean is ever ill : 

'Tis best to feed Love ; but not over- fill: 

Go then discreetly to the Bed of pleasure ; 

And this remember, Vertue keepes the measure. 25 

Chorus Virginutn. 

4. Luckie signes we have discri'd 
To encourage on the Bride ; 
And to these we have espi'd. 
Not a kissing Cupid flyes 

Here about, but has his eyes, 30 

To imply your Love is wise, 



2 1 8 Hesperides. 



Chorus Pastorum. 

5. Here we present a fleece 

To make a peece 
Of cloth ; 
Nor, Faire, must you be loth 35 

Your Finger to apply 
To huswiferie. 
Then, then begin 
To spin : 
And (Sweetling) marke you, what a Web will come 40 

Into your Chests, drawn by your painfull Thumb. 

Chorus Matronarum. 

6. Set you to your Wheele, and wax 
Rich, by the Ductile Wool and Flax. 

Yarne is an Income ; and the Huswives thread 

The Larder fills with meat ; the Bin with bread. 45 

Chorus Senum. 

7. Let wealth come in by comely thrift, 
And not by any sordid shift : 

'Tis haste 

Makes waste ; 
Extreames have still their fault ; 50 

TTie softest Fire makes the sweetest Mault. 
Who gripes too hard the dry and siip'rie sand. 
Holds none at all, or little in his hand. 

Chorus Virginum. 

8. Goddesse of Pleasure, Youth and Peace, 

Give them the blessing of encrease : 55 

And thou Lucina, that do'st heare 

The vowes of those, that children beare : 

When as her Aprill houre drawes neare, 

Be thou then propitious there. 

Chorus Juvenum. 

9. Farre hence be all speech, that may anger move : 60 
Sweet words must nourish soft and gentle Love. 

Chorus omnium. 

10. Live in the Love of Doves, and having told 

The Ravens yeares, go hence more Ripe then old. 



Hesperides. 219 

To his lovely Mistresses. 

One night i' th' yeaie my dearest Beauties, come 

And bring those dew-drink-offerings to my Tomb. 

When thence ye see my reverend Ghost to rise, 

And there to hck th' effused sacrifice : 

Though palenes be the Livery that I weare, S 

Looke ye not wan, or colourlesse for feare. 

Trust me I will not hurt ye ; or once shew 

The least grim looke, or cast a frown on you : 

Nor shall the Tapers when I'm there, burn blew. 

This I may do (perhaps) as I glide by, lo 

Cast on my Girles a glance, and loving eye : 

Or fold mine armes, and sigh, because I've lost 

The world so soon, and in it, you the most. 

Then these, no feares more on your Fancies fall, 

Though then I smile, and speake no words at all. 15 



Upon Love. 

1. A Christall Violl Ck/«(/ brought, 

Which had a juice in it : 
Of which who drank, he said no thought 
Of Love he sho'd admit. 

2. I greedy of the prize, did drinke, S 

And emptied soon the glasse ; 
Which burnt me so, that I do thinke 
The fire of hell it was. 

3. Give me my earthen Cups again, 

The Christall I contemne ; 10 

Which, though enchas'd with Pearls, contain 
A deadly draught in them. 

4. And thou O Cupid \ come not to 

My Threshold, since I see. 
For all I have, or else can do, 15 

Thou still wilt cozen me. 

To his lovely Mistresses. 3 rise] kisse j6^8 : cerr, in ori^. Errata 



2 2 o Hesperides. 

The Beggar to Mab, the Fairie Queen. 

Please your Grace, from out your Store, 

Give an Almes to one that's poore, 

That your mickle, may have more. 

Black I'm grown for want of meat ; 

Give me then an Ant to eate ; 5 

Or the cleft eare of a Mouse 

Over-sowr'd in drinke of Souce : 

Or sweet Lady reach to me 

The Abdomen of a Bee ; 

Or commend a Crickets-hip, lo 

Or his Huckson, to my Scrip. 

Give for bread, a little bit 

Of a Pease, that 'gins to chit, 

And my full thanks take for it. 

Floure of Fuz-balls, that's too good iS 

For a man in needy-hood : 

But the Meal of Mill-dust can 

Well content a craving man. 

Any Orts the Elves refuse 

Well will serve the Beggars use. ao 

But if this may seem too much 

For an Almes ; then give me such 

Little bits, that nestle there 

In the Pris'ners Fanier. 

So a blessing light upon 35 

You, and mighty Oberon : 

That your plenty last till when, 

I return your Almes agen. 



yf K end decreed. 

Let's be jocund while we may; 
All things have an ending day : 
And when once the Work is done ; 
Fates revolve no Flax t/iave spun. 



Hesperides. 221 

Upon a child. 



Here a pretty Baby lies 
Sung asleep with Lullabies : 
Pray be silent, and not stirre 
Th' easie earth that covers her. 



Painting sometimes permitted. 

If Nature do deny 
Colours, let Art supply. 



Farwell Frost, or welcome the Spring. 

Fled are the Frosts, and now the Fields appeare 

Re-cloth'd in fresh and verdant Diaper. 

Thaw'd are the snowes, and now the lusty Spring 

Gives to each Mead a neat enameling. 

The Palms put forth their Gemmes, and every Tree 5 

Now swaggers in her Leavy gallantry. 

The while the Dauliati Minstrell sweetly sings. 

With warbling Notes, her Tyrrean sufferings. 

What gentle Winds perspire ? As if here 

Never had been the Northern Plunderer 10 

To strip the Trees, and Fields, to their distresse, 

Leaving them to a pittied nakednesse. 

And look how when a frantick Storme doth tear 

A stubborn Oake, or Holme (long growing there) 

But lul'd to calmnesse, then succeeds a breeze 15 

That scarcely stirs the nodding leaves of Trees : 

So when this War (which tempest-like doth spoil 

Our saltj our Corn, our Honie, Wine, and Oile) 

Falls to a temper, and doth mildly cast 

His inconsiderate Frenzie off (at last) 20 

The gentle Dove may, when these turmoils cease. 

Bring in her Bill, once more, tJie Branch of Peace. 



22 2 Mesperides. 

The Hag. 

1. The Hag is astride, 
This night for to ride ; 

The Devill and shee together : 

Through thick, and through thin, 

Now out, and then in, 5 

Though ne'r so foule be the weather. 

2. A Thorn or a Burr 
She takes for a Spurre : 

With a lash of a Bramble she rides now. 

Through Brakes and through Bryars, 10 

O're Ditches, and Mires, 
She followes the Spirit that guides now. 

3. No Beast, for his food. 
Dares now range the wood ; 

But husht in his laire he lies lurking : 15 

While mischeifs, by these, 

On Land and on Seas, 
At noone of Night are a working. 

4. The storme will arise, 

And trouble the skies ; 30 

This night, and more for the wonder, 

The ghost from the Tomb 

Affrighted shall come, 
Cal'd out by the clap of the Thunder. 



Upon an old man a Residendarie. 

Tread, Sirs, as lightly as ye can 
Upon the grave of this old man. 
Twice fortie (bating but one year, 
And thrice three weekes) he lived here. 
Whom gentle fate translated hence 
To a more happy Residence. 
Yet, Reader, let me tell thee this 
(Which from his ghost a promise is) 
If here ye will some few teares shed, 
He'l never haunt ye now he's dead. 



MesperideU 523 



Upon Teares 

Teares, though th'are here below the sinners brine, 
Above they are the Angels spiced wine. 

Physitians. 

Physitians fight not against men ; but these 
Combate for men, by conquering the disease. 

The Primitise to Parents. 

Our Houshold-gods our Parents be ; 
And manners good requires, that we 
The first-Fruits give to them, who gave 
Us hands to get what here we have. 

To Silvia. 

I am holy, while I stand 
Circum-crost by thy pure hand : 
But when that is gone ; Again, 
I, as others, am Prophane. 



To his Closet-Gods. 

When I goe Hence ye Closet-Gods, I feare 
Never againe to have ingression here : 
Where I have had, what ever thing co'd be 
Pleasant, and precious to my Muse and me. 
Besides rare sweets, I had a Book which none 
Co'd reade the Intext but my selfe alone. 
About the Cover of this Book there went 
A curious-comely clean Compartlement : 
And, in the midst, to grace it more, was set 
A blushing-pretty-peeping Rubelet : 
But now 'tis clos'd ; and being shut, & seal'd, 
Be it, O be it, never more reveal'd ! 
Keep here still, Closet-Gods, 'fore whom I've set 
Oblations oft, of sweetest Marmelet. 



224 Hesperides. 

A Bacchanalian Verse. 

1. Fill me a mighty Bowie 

Up to the brim : 
That I may drink 
Unto vay Johnsons soule. 

2. Crowne it agen agen ; 

And thrice repeat 
That happy heat ; 
To drink to Thee my Ben. 

3. Well I can quaffe, I see, 

To th' number five, 
Or nine ; but thrive 
In frenzie ne'r like thee. 



Long looktfor comes at last. 

Though long it be, yeeres may repay the debt ; 
None loseth that, which he in time may get. 

To Youth. 

Drink Wine, and live here blithefull, while ye may : 
The morrowes life too late is. Live to-day. 

Never too late to dye. 

No man comes late unto that place from whence 
Never man yet had a regredience. 

A Hymne to the Muses. 

O ! you the Virgins nine ! 
That doe our soules encline 
To noble Discipline ! 
Nod to this vow of mine : 
Come then, and now enspire 
My violl and my lyre 

A Bacchanalian Verse. 2 brim] The rime requires brink 



Hesperides. 225 

With your eternall fire : 

And make me one entire 

Composer in your Quire. 

Then I'le your Altars strew lo 

With Roses sweet and new ; 

And ever live a true 

Acknowledger of you. 

On himselfe. 

He sing no more, nor will I longer write 

Of that sweet Lady, or that gallant Knight : 

He sing no more of Frosts, Snowes, Dews and Showers ; 

No more of Groves, Meades^ Springs, and wreaths of Flowers : 

He write no more, nor will I tell or sing 5 

Of Cupid, and his wittie coozning : 

He sing no more of death, or shall the grave 

No more my Dirges, and my Trentalls have. 

To Momus. 

Who read'st this Book that I have writ, 
And can'st not mend, but carpe at it : 
By all the muses ! thou shalt be 
Anathema to it, and me. 

Ambition. 

In wayes to greatnesse, think on this, 
That slippery all Ambition is. 

The Country life, to the honoured M. End. Porter, 
Groome of the Bed-Chamber to His Maj. 

Sweet Country life, to such unknown. 

Whose lives are others, not their own ! 

But serving Courts, and Cities, be 

Less happy, less enjoying thee. 

Thou never Plow'st the Oceans foame 5 

To seek, and bring rough Pepper home : 

A Hymns to the Muses. 7 eternall] Misprinted etetnall 

HERttICK Q 



2 26 Hesperides. 



Nor to the Eastern Ind dost rove 

To bring from thence the scorched Clove. 

Nor, with the losse of thy lov'd rest, 

Bring'st home the Ingot from the West lo 

No, thy Ambition's Master-piece 

Flies no thought higher then a fleece : 

Or how to pay thy Hinds, and cleere 

All scores ; and so to end the yeere : 

But walk'st about thine own dear bounds, 15 

Not envying others larger grounds : 

For well thou know'st, 'tis not th' extent 

Of Land makes life, but sweet content. 

When now the Cock (the Plow-mans Home) 

Calls forth the lilly-wristed Morne ; jo 

Then to thy corn-fields thou dost goe, 

Which though well soyl'd, yet thou dost know, 

That the best compost for the Lands 

Is the wise Masters Feet, and Hands. 

There at the Plough thou find'st thy Teame, 35 

With a Hind whistling there to them : 

And cheer'st them up, by singing how 

The Kingdoms portion is the Plow. 

This done, then to th' enameld Meads 

Thou go'st ; and as thy foot there treads, 30 

Thou seest a present God-like Power 

Imprinted in each Herbe and Flower : 

And smell'st the breath of great-ey'd Kine, 

Sweet as the blossomes of the Vine. 

Here thou behold'st thy large sleek Neat 36 

Unto the Dew-laps up in meat : 

And, as thou look'st, the wanton Steere, 

The Heifer, Cow, and Oxe draw neere 

To make a pleasing pastime there. 

These seen, thou go'st to view thy flocks 40 

Of sheep, (safe from the Wolfe and Fox) 

And find'st their bellies there as full 

Of short sweet grasse, as backs with wool. 

And leav'st them (as they feed and fill) 

A Shepherd piping on a hill. 45 

For Sports, for Pagentrie, and Playes, 

Thou hast thy Eves, and Holydayes : 



Hesperides. 227 

On which the young men and maids meet 
To exercise their dancing feet : 

Tripping the comely country round, 50 

With Daffadils and Daisies crown'd. 
Thy Wakes, thy Quintels, here thou hast, 
Thy May-poles too with Garlands grac't : 
Thy Morris-dance ; thy Whitsun-ale ; 

Thy Sheering-feast, which never faile. 55 

Thy Harvest home ; thy Wassaile bowle, 
That's tost up after Fox i' th' Hole. 
Thy Mummeries ; thy Twelfe-tide Kings 
And Queenes ; thy Christmas revellings : 
Thy Nut-browne mirth ; thy Russet wit ; 60 

And no man payes too deare for it. 
To these, thou hast thy times to goe 
And trace the Hare i' th' trecherous Snow : 
Thy witty wiles to draw, and get 

The Larke into the Trammell net : 65 

Thou hast thy Cockrood, and thy Glade 
To take the precious Phesant made : 
Thy Lime-twigs, Snares, and Pit-falls then 
To catch the pilfring Birds, not Men. 

O happy life ! if that their good 70 

The Husbandmen but understood ! 
Who all the day themselves doe please, 
And Younglings, with such sports as these. 
And, lying down, have nought t' affright 
Sweet sleep, that makes more short the night. 75 

CcBtera desuni 



To Electra. 

I dare not ask a kisse ; 

I dare not beg a smile ; 
Lest having that, or this, 

I might grow proud the while. 

No, no, the utmost share 
Of my desire, shall be 

Onely to kisse that Aire, 
That lately kissed thee. 



2 2 8 Hesperides. 

To his worthy friend, M. Arthur Bartly. 

When after many Lusters thou shalt be 

Wrapt up in Seare-cloth with thine Ancestrie : 

When of thy ragg'd Escutcheons shall be scene 

So little left, as if they ne'r had been : 

Thou shalt thy Name have, and thy Fames best trust, 

Here with the Generation of my Just. 



What kind ofMistresse he would have. 

Be the Mistresse of my choice, 

Cleane in manners, cleere in voice : 

Be she witty, more then wise ; 

Pure enough, though not Precise : 

Be she shewing in her dresse, 5 

Like a civill Wilderness ; 

That the curious may detect 

Order in a sweet neglect : 

Be she rowling in her eye, 

Tempting all the passers by : 10 

And each Ringlet of her haire, 

An Enchantment, or a Snare, 

For to catch the Lookers on ; 

But her self held fast by none. 

Let her Lucrece all day be, 15 

TTiais in the night, to me. 

Be she such, as neither will 

Famish me, nor over-fill. 



The Rosemarie branch. 

Grow for two ends, it matters not at all, 
Be't for my Bridall, or my Buriall. 



Hesperides. 229 

A Paranatkall, or Advisive Verse, to his 

friend, M. John Wicks. 

Is this a life, to break thy sleep ? 

To rise as soon as day doth peep ? 

To tire thy patient Oxe or Asse 

By noone, and let thy good dayes passe, 

Not knowing This, iiaXjove decrees 5 

Some mirth, t'adulce mans miseries? 

No ; 'tis a life, to have thine oyle. 

Without extortion, from thy soyle : 

Thy faithfull fields to yeeld thee Graine, 

Although with some, yet little paine : 10 

To have thy mind, and nuptiall bed. 

With feares, and cares uncumbered : 

A Pleasing Wife, that by thy side 

Lies softly panting like a Bride. 

This is to live, and to endeere 15 

Those minutes, Time has lent us here. 

Then, while Fates suffer, live thou free, 

(As is that ayre that circles thee) 

And crown thy temples too, and let 

Thy servant, not thy own self, sweat, 20 

To strut thy barnes with sheafs of Wheat. 

Time steals away like to a stream, 

And we glide hence away with them. 

No sound recalls the houres once fled. 

Or Roses, being withered: 25 

Nor us (my Friend) when we are lost. 

Like to a Deaw, or melted Frost. 

Then live we mirthfull, while we should. 

And turn the iron Age to Gold. 

Let's feast, and frolick, sing, and play, 30 

And thus lesse last, then live our Day. 

Whose life with care is overcast. 

That man's not said to live, but last : 

Nor is't a life, seven yeares to tell. 

But for to live that half seven well: 35 

And that wee'l do ; as men, who know, 

Some few sands spent, we hence must go. 

Both to be blended in the Urn, 

From whence there's never a return. 



230 Hesperides. 

Once seen, and no more. 

Thousands each day passe by, which wee, 
Once past and gone, no more shall see. 



Love. 

This Axiom I have often heard, 
Kings ought to be more knfd, then fear' d. 

To M. Denham, on his Prospective Poem. 

Or lookt I back unto the Times hence flown, 

To praise those Muses, and dislike our own ? 

Or did I walk those /'^a^-Gardens through. 

To kick the Flow'rs, and scorn their odours too ? 

I might (and justly) be reputed (here) 5 

One nicely mad, or peevishly severe. 

But by Apollo \ as I worship wit, 

(Where I have cause to burn perfumes to it :) 

So, I confesse, 'tis somwhat to do well 

In our high art, although we can't excell, 10 

Like thee ; or dare the Buskins to unloose 

Of thy brave, bold, and sweet Maronian Muse. 

But since I'm cal'd (rare Denham) to be gone. 

Take from thy Herrick this conclusion : 

'Tis dignity in others, if they be 15 

Crown'd Poets ; yet live Princes under thee : 

The while their wreaths and Purple Robes do shine, 

Lesse by their own jemms, then those beams of thine. 



A Hymne, to the Lares. 

It was, and still my care is. 
To worship ye, the Lares, 
With crowns of greenest Parsley, 
And Garlick chives not scarcely : 
For favours here to warme me, 
And not by fire to harme me. 
For gladding so my hearth here, 
With inoffensive mirth here ; 



Hesperides. 231 

That while the Wassaile Bowie here 

With North-down Ale doth troule here, lo 

No sillable doth fall here, 

To marre the mirth at all here. 

For which, 6 Chimney-keepers I 

(I dare not call ye Sweepers) 

So long as I am able 15 

To keep a countrey-table, 

Great be my fare, or small cheere, 

I'le eat and drink up all here. 

Deniall in women no disheartning to men. 

Women, although they ne're so goodly make it, 
Their fashion is, but to say no, to take it. 

Adversity. 

Love is maintained by wealth ; when all is spent. 
Adversity then breeds the discontent. 

To Fortune. 

Tumble me down, and I will sit 

Upon my ruines (smiling yet :) 

Teare me to tatters ; yet I'le be 

Patient in my necessitie. 

Laugh at my scraps of cloaths, and shun 5 

Me, as a fear'd infection : 

Yet scarre-crow-like I'le walk, as one, 

Neglecting thy derision. 

To Anthea. 

Come Anthea, know thou this. 

Love at no time idle is : 

Let's be doing, though we play 

But at push-pin (half the day :) 

Chains of sweet bents let us make, f 

Captive one, or both, to take : 

In which bondage we will lie, 

Soules transfusing thus, and die. 



232 Hesperides. 



Cruelties. 

Nero commanded ; but withdrew his eyes 
From the beholding Death, and crueltie 

Perseverance. 

Hast thou begun an act ? ne're then give o're : 
No man despaires to do what's done before. 

Upon his Verses. 

What off-spring other men have got, 
The how, where, when, I question not. 
These are the Children I have left ; 
Adopted some ; none got by theft. 
But all are toucht (like lawful! plate) 
And no Verse illegitimate. 

Distance betters Dignities. 

Kings must not oft be seen by publike eyes ; 
State at a distance adds to dignities. 

Health. 

Health is no other (as the learned hold) 
But a just measure both of Heat and Cold. 

To Dianeme. A Ceremonie in Glocester. 

I'le to thee a Simnell bring, 
'Gainst thou go'st a mothering, 
So that, when she blesseth thee, 
Half that blessing thou'lt give me. 

To the King. 

Give way, give way, now, now my Charles shines here, 
A Publike Light (in this immensive Sphere.) 
Some starres were fixt before ; but these are dim, 
Compar'd (in this my ample Orbe) to Him. 
Draw in your feeble fiers, while that He 
Appeares but in His Meaner Majestic. 



Hesperid^s, 233 

Where, if such glory flashes from His Name, 

Which is His Shade, who can abide His p-lame ! 

Princes, a?id such like Publike Lights as tliese, 

Must not be lookt on, but at distances : to 

For, if we gaze on These brave Lamps too neer, 

Our eyes they' I blind, or if not blind, they I bleer 

The Funerall Rites of the Rose. 

The Rose was sick, and smiling di'd ; 

And (being to be sanctifi'd) 

About the Bed, there sighing stood 

The sweet, and flowrie Sisterhood. 

Some hung the head, while some did bring 5 

(To wash her) water from the Spring. 

Some laid her forth, while other wept. 

But all a solemne Fast there kept. 

The holy Sisters some among 

The sacred Dirge and Trentall sung. 10 

But ah ! what sweets smelt every where, 

As Heaven had spent all perfumes there. 

At last, when prayers for the dead. 

And Rites were all accomplished ; 

They, weeping, spread a Lawnie Loome, 15 

And clos'd her up, as in a Tombe. 



ne Rainbow : or curious Covenant. 

Mine eyes, like clouds, were drizling raine. 

And as they thus did entertaine 

The gentle Beams irom Julia's sight 

To mine eyes level'd opposite : 

O Thing admir'd ! there did appeare 

A curious Rainbow smiling there ; 

Which was the Covenant, that she 

No more wo'd drown mine eyes, or me. 

The last stroke strike sure. 

Though by well-warding many blowes w'ave past, 
27iat stroke most fear' d is, which is struck the last. 



2 34 Hesperides. 



Fortune. 

Fortune's a blind profuser of her own, 

Too much she gives to some, enough to none. 



Stool-ball. 

At Stool-ball, Lucia, let us play. 
For Sugar-cakes and Wine ; 

Or for a Tansie let us pay, 

The losse or thine, or mine. 

If thou, my Deere, a winner be 
At trundling of the Ball, 

The wager thou shalt have, and me. 
And my misfortunes all. 

But if (my Sweetest) I shall get. 
Then I desire but this ; 

That likewise I may pay the Bet, 
And have for all a kisse. 



To Sappho. 

Let us now take time, and play. 
Love, and live here while we may ; 
Drink rich wine ; and make good cheere. 
While we have our being here : 
For, once dead, and laid i'th grave, 
No return from thence we have. 



On Poet Prat, Epigr. 

Prat He writes Satyres ; but herein's the fault, 
In no one Satyre there's a mite of salt. 

Upon Tuck, Epigr. 

At Post and Paire, or Slam, Tom Tuck would play 
This Christmas, but his want wherwith, sayes Nay. 



Hesperides. 235 

Biting of Beggars. 



Who, railing, drives the Lazar from his door, 
Instead of almes, sets dogs upon the poor. 



The May-pole. 

The May-pole is up, 

Now give me the cup ; 
I'le drink to the Garlands a-round it : 

But first unto those 

Whose hands did compose 
The glory of flowers that crown'd it. 

A health to my Girles, 

Whose husbands may Earles 
Or Lords be, (granting my wishes) 

And when that ye wed 

To the Bridall Bed, 
Then multiply all, like to Fishes. 



Men mind no state in sicknesse. 

That flow of Gallants which approach 

To kisse thy hand from out the coach ', 

That fleet of Lackeyes, which do run 

Before thy swift Postilion ; 

Those strong-hoof d Mules, which we behold, 

Rein'd in with Purple, Pearl, and gold. 

And shod with silver, prove to be 

The drawers of the axeltree. 

Thy Wife, thy Children, and the state 

Of Persian Loomes, and antique Plate : 

All these, and more, shall then afford 

No joy to thee their sickly Lord. 



Adversity. 

Adversity hurts none, but onely such 

Whom whitest Fortune dandled has too piuch. 



236 Hesperides. 



Want. 

Need is no vice at all ; though here it be, 
With men, a loathed inconveniencie. 



Griefe. 

Sorrowes divided amongst many, lesse 
Discmciate a man in deep distresse. 



Love palpable, 

I prest my Julia's lips, and in the kisse 
Her Soule and Love were palpable in this. 



No action hard to affection. 

Nothing hard, or harsh can prove 
Unto those that truly love. 



Meane things overcome mighty. 

By the weak'st means things mighty are o'rethrown, 
He's Lord of thy life, who contemnes his own. 

'The Bracelet of Pearle : to Silvia. 

I brake thy Bracelet 'gainst my will ; 

And, wretched, I did see 
Thee discomposed then, and still 

Art discontent with me. 

One jemme was lost ; and I will get 

A richer pearle for thee, 
Then ever, dearest Silvia, yet 

Was drunk to Antonie. 

Or, for revenge, I'le tell thee what 
Thou for the breach shalt do ; 

First, crack the strings, and after that. 
Cleave thou my heart in two. 



Hesperides. 237 

How Roses came red. 



'Tis said, as Cupid danc't among 
The Gods, he down the Nectar flung ; 
Which, on the white Rose being shed, 
Made it for ever after red. 



Kings. 

Men are not born Kings, but are men renown'd ; 
Chose first, confirm'd next, & at last are crown'd. 



First work, and then wages. 

Prepost'rous is that order, when we run 
To ask our wages, e're our work be done. 



'iteares, and Laughter. 

Knew'st thou, one moneth wo'd take thy life away, 
Thou'dst weep ; but laugh, sho'd it not last a day. 



Glory. 

Glory no other thing is ( Tullie sayes) 

Then a mans frequent Fame, spoke out with praise 



Possessions. 

Those possessions short-liv'd are. 
Into the which we come by warre. 



Laxare fibulam. 

To loose the button, is no lesse, 
Then to cast off all bashfulnesse. 



238 Hesperides. 



His relume to London. 

From the dull confines of the drooping West, 

To see the day spring from the pregnant East, 

Ravisht in spirit, I come, nay rnore, I flie 

To thee, blest place of my Nativitie ! 

Thus, thus with hallowed foot I touch the ground, 5 

With thousand blessings by thy Fortune crown'd. 

O fruitfuU Genius ! that bestowest here 

An everlasting plenty, yeere by yeere. 

Flace ! O People ! Manners ! fram'd to please 

AH Nations, Customes, Kindreds, Languages ! 10 

1 am a free-born Roman ; suffer then. 
That I amongst you live a Citizen. 

London my home is : though by hard fate sent 

Into a long and irksome banishment ; 

Yet since cal'd back ; henceforward let me be, 15 

O native countrey, repossest by thee ! 

For, rather then I'le to the West return, 

I'le beg of thee first here to have mine Urn. 

Weak I am grown, and must in short time fall ; 

Give thou my sacred Reliques Buriall. 20 

Not every day fit for Verse. 

'Tis not ev'ry day, that I 

Fitted am to prophesie : 

No, but when the Spirit fils 

The fantastick Pannicles : 

Full of fier ; then I write 5 

As the Godhead doth indite. 

Thus inrag'd, my lines are hurl'd. 

Like the Sybells, through the world. 

Look how next the holy fier 

Either slakes, or doth retire ; 10 

So the Fancie cooles, till when 

That brave Spirit comes agen. 

Poverty the greatest pack. 

To mortall men great loads allotted be, 
But of all packs, no pack like poverty. 



Hesperides. 239 

A Beucolick, or discourse of Neatherds. 

I. Come blithefull Neatherds, let us lay 
A wager, who the best shall play, 
Of thee, or I, the Roundelay, 
That fits the businesse of the Day. 
CAor. And Lallage the Judge shall be, 5 

To give the prize to thee, or me. 

■i. Content, begin, and I will bet 
A Heifer smooth, and black as jet, 
In every part alike compleat. 

And wanton as a Kid as yet. 10 

Chor. And Lallage (with cow-like eyes) 
Shall be Disposeresse of the prize. 

1. Against thy Heifer, I will here 
Lay to thy stake a lustie Steere, 

With gilded homes, and burnisht cleere. 15 

Chor. Why then begin, and let us heare 
The soft, the sweet, the mellow note 
That gently purles from eithers Oat. 

2. The stakes are laid : let's now apply 

Each one to make his melody : ao 

Lai. The equall Umpire shall be I, 

Who'l hear, and so judge righteously. 
Chor. Much time is spent in prate ; begin, 
And sooner play, the sooner win. 

\He playes. 
I. That's sweetly touch't, I must confesse : 25 

Thou art a man of worthinesse : 
But hark how I can now expresse 
My love unto my Neatherdesse. 

\He sings. 
Chor. A suger'd note ! and sound as sweet 

As Kine, when they at milking meet. 30 

I. Now for to win thy Heifer faire, 
I'le strike thee such a nimble Ayre, 
That thou shalt say (thy selfe) 'tis rare ; 
And title me without compare. 
Chor. Lay by a while your Pipes, and rest, 35 

Since both have here deserved best. 



.2 4 o Hesperides. 

i. To get thy Steerling, once again, 
I'le play thee such another strain ; 
That thou shalt swear, my Pipe do's raigne 
Over thine Oat, as Soveraigne. 40 

\He sings. 
Chor. And Lallage shall tell by this, 

Whose now the prize and wager is. 

1. Give me the prize : 2. The day is mine : 

I. Not so ; my Pipe has silenc't thine : 

And hadst thou wager'd twenty Kinc, 45 

They were mine own. Lai. In love combine. 

Chor. And lay we down our Pipes together. 
As wearie, not o'recome by either. 

^rue safety. 

'Tis not the Walls, or purple, that defends 

A Prince from Foes ; but 'tis his Fort of Friends. 



A Prognostick. 

As many Lawes and Lawyers do expresse 
Nought but a Kingdoms ill-affectednesse : 
Ev'n so, those streets and houses do but show 
Store of diseases, where Physitians flow. 

Upon Julia's sweat. 

Wo'd ye oyle of Blossomes get ? 
Take it from ray Julia's sweat : 
Oyl of Lillies, and of Spike, 
From her moysture take the like : 
Let her breath, or let her blow, 
All rich spices thence will flow. 

Proof to no purpose. 

You see this gentle streame, that glides, 
Shov'd on, by quick succeeding Tides : 
Trie if this sober streame you can 
Follow to th' wilder Ocean : 



Hesperides. 241 

And see, if there it keeps unspent 5 

In that congesting element. 

Next, from that world of waters, then 

By poares and cavernes back agen 

Induc't that inadultrate same 

Streame to the Spring from whence it came. lo 

This with a wonder when ye do, 

As easie, and els easier too : 

Then may ye recollect the graines 

Of my particular Remaines ; 

After a thousand Lusters hurld, iS 

By ruffling winds, about the world. 



Fame. 

'Tis still obserd d, that Fame ne're sings 
The order, but the Sum of things. 



By use comes easinesse. 

Oft bend the Bow, and thou with ease shalt do, 
What others can't with all their strength put to. 



To the Genius of his house. 

Command the Roofe great Genius, and from thence 

Into this house powre downe thy influence. 

That through each room a golden pipe may run 

Of living water by thy Benizon. 

Fulfill the Larders, and with strengthning bread 

Be evermore these Bynns replenished. 

Next, like a Bishop consecrate my ground, 

That luckie Fairies here may dance their Round : 

And after that, lay downe some silver pence, 

The Masters charge and care to recompence. 

Charme then the chambers ; make the beds for ease. 

More then for peevish pining sicknesses. 

Fix the foundation fast, and let the Roofe 

Grow old with time, but yet keep weather-proofe. 



2/\.2 Hespertdes. 

His Grange, or private wealth. 

Though Clock, 
To tell how night drawes hence, I've none, 

A Cock, 
I have, to sing how day drawes on. 

I have 5 

A maid (my J'retv) by good luck sent, 

To save 
That little, Fates me gave or lent. 

A Hen 
I keep, which creeking day by day, lo 

Tells when 
She goes her long white egg to lay. 

A Goose 
I have, which, with a jealous eare. 

Lets loose 15 

Her tongue, to tell what danger's neare. 

A Lamb 
I keep (tame) with my morsells fed. 

Whose Dam 
An Orphan left him (lately dead.) 10 

A Cat 
I keep, that playes about my House, 

Grown fat, 
With eating many a miching Mouse. 

To these 35 

A * Trasy I do keep, whereby * His Spa- 

I please niel. 

The more my rurall privacie : 

Which are 
But toyes, to give my heart some ease : 30 

Where care 
None is, slight things do lightly please. 



Good precepts, or counsell. 

In all thy need, be thou possest 
Still with a well-prepared brest : 
Nor let the shacldes make thee sad ; 
Thou canst but have, what others had. 



Hesperides. 543 



And this for comfort thou must know, 
Times that are ill wo'nt still be so. 
Clouds will not ever powre down raine ; 
A sullen day will cleere againe. 
First, peales of Thunder we must heare, 
Then Lutes and Harpes shall stroke the eare. 

Money makes the mirth. 

When all Birds els do of their musick faile, 
Money's the still-sweet-singing Nightingale. 

Upon Lucia dahled in the deaw. 

My Lucia in the deaw did go, 

And prettily bedabled so, 

Her cloaths held up, she shew'd withall 

Her decent legs, cleane, long and small. 

I follow'd after to descrie 

Part of the nak't sincerity ; 

But still the envious Scene between 

Deni'd the Mask I wo'd have seen. 



Charon and Phylomel, a "Dialogue sung. 

Ph. Charon ! O gentle Charon ! let me wooe thee, 

By tears and pitie now to come unto mee. 
Ch. 'What voice so sweet and charming do I heare ? 

Say what thou art. Fh. I prithee first draw neare. 
Ch. A sound I heare, but nothing yet can see, 5 

Speak where thou art. Ph. O Charon pittie me ! 

I am a bird, and though no name I tell. 

My warbling note will say I'm Phylomel. 
Ch. What's that to me, I waft nor fish or fowles, 

Nor Beasts (fond thing) but only humane soules. lo 

Ph. Alas for me ! Ch. Shame on thy witching note. 

That made me thus hoist saile, and bring my Boat : 

But He returne; what mischief brought thee hither? 
Ph. A deale of Love, and much, much Griefe together. 
Ch. What's thy request? Ph. That since she's now beneath 15 

Who fed my life, I'le follow her in death. 



2 44 Hesperides. 

Ch. And is that all ? I'm gone. Ph. By love I pray thee, 
Ch. Talk not of love, all pray, but few soules pay me. 
Ph, lie give thee vows & tears. Ch. can tears pay skores 

For mending sails, for patching Boat and Oares ? ao 

Ph. I'le beg a penny, or He sing so long, 

Till thou shalt say, I've paid thee with a song. 
Ch. Why then begin, and all the while we make 

Our slothfull passage o're the Stygian Lake, 

Thou & I'le sing to make these dull Shades merry, 35 

Who els with tears we'd doubtles drown my ferry. 

A Temarie of littles, upon a pipkin of 
Jellie sent to a Lady. 

1. A little Saint best fits a little Shrine, 
A little prop best fits a little Vine, 

As my small Cruse best fits my little Wine. 

2. A little Seed best fits a little Soyle, 

A little Trade best fits a little Toyle : 5 

As my small Jarre best fits my little Oyle. 

3. A little Bin best fits a little Bread, 
A little Garland fits a little Head : 

As my small stuffe best fits my little Shed. 

4. A little Hearth best fits a little Fire, 10 
A little Chappell fits a little Quire, 

As my small Bell best fits my little Spire. 

5. A little streame best fits a little Boat ; 
A little lead best fits a little Float ; 

As my small Pipe best fits my little note 15 

6. A little meat best fits a little bellie. 

As sweetly Lady, give me leave to tell ye 
This little Pipkin fits this little JeUie. 

Upon the Roses in Julias bosome. 

Thrice happie Roses, so much grac't, to have 
Within the Bosome of my Love your grave. 
Die when ye will, your sepulchre is knowne, 
Your Grave her Bosome is, the Lawne the Stone 



Hesperides. 245 

Maids nays are nothing. 



Maids nay's are nothing, they are shie 
But to desire what they denie. 



The smell of the Sacrifice. 

The Gods require the thighes 
Of Beeves for sacrifice ; 
Which rosted, we the steam 
Must sacrifice to them : 
Who though they do not eat, 
Yet love the smell of meat. 



Lovers how they come and part. 

A Gyges Ring they beare about them still, 

To be, and not seen when and where they will. 

They tread on clouds, and though they sometimes fall, 

They fall like dew, but make no noise at all. 

So silently they one to th' other come, 

As colours steale into the Peare or Plum, 

And Aire-like, leave no pression to be seen 

Where e're they met, or parting place has been. 



In praise of women. 

O Jupiter, sho'd I speake ill 
Of woman-kind, first die I will ; 
Since that I know, 'mong all the rest 
Of creatures, woman is the best. 



The Apron of Flowers. 

To gather Flowers Sappfia went, 

And homeward she did bring 

Within her Lawnie Continent, 

The treasure of the Spring. 



246 Hesperides. 

She smiling blusht, and blushing smil'd, 
And sweetly blushing thus, 

She lookt as she'd been got with child 
By young Favonius. 

Her Apron gave (as she did passe) 
An Odor more divine, 

More pleasing too, then ever was 
The lap of Proserpine. 



The Candor 0/" Julias teeth. 

White as Zenobias teeth, the which the Girles 

Of Rome did weare for their most precious Pearles. 



Upon her weeping. 

She wept upon her cheeks, and weeping so. 

She seem'd to quench loves fires that there did glow. 



Another upon her weeping. 

She by the River sate, and sitting there. 
She wept, and made it deeper by a teare. 



Delay. 

Break off Delay, since we but read of one 
That ever prosper'd by Cunctation. 



To Sir John Berkley, Govemour of Exeter. 

Stand forth brave man, since Fate has made thee here 

The Hector over Aged Exeter ; 

Who for a long sad time has weeping stood. 

Like a poore Lady lost in Widdowhood :, 



Hesperides. 247 

But feares not now to see her safety sold 5 

(As other Townes and Cities were) for gold, 

By those ignoble Births, which shame the stem 

That gave Progermination unto them : 

Whose restlesse Ghosts shall heare their children sing, 

Our Sires betraid their Countrey and their King. lo 

True, if this Citie seven times rounded was 

With rock, and seven times circumflankt with brasse, 

Yet if thou wert not, Berkley, loyall proofe. 

The Senators down tumbling with the Roofe, 

Would into prais'd (but pitied) ruines fall, 15 

Leaving no shew, where stood the Capitoll. 

But thou art just and itchlesse, and dost please 

Thy Genius with two strength'ning Buttresses, 

Faith, and Affection : which will never slip 

To weaken this thy great Dictator-ship. 20 



To Electra. Love looks for Love. 

Love love begets, then never be 
Unsoft to him who's smooth to thee. 
Tygers and Beares (I've heard some say) 
For profer'd love will love repay : 
None are so harsh, but if they find 
Softnesse in others, will be kind ; 
Affection will affection move, 
Then you must like, because I love. 



Recession spoiles Resolution. 

Hast thou attempted greatnesse ? then go on, 
Back-turning slackens Resolution. 



Contention. 

Discreet and prudent we that Discord call, 
That either profits, or not hurts at all. 



248 Hesperides. 



Consultation. 

Consult ere thou begin'st, that done, go on 
With all wise speed for execution. 



Love dislikes nothing. 

Whatsoever thing I see, 
Rich or poore although it be ; 
'Tis a Mistresse unto mee. 

Be my Girle, or faire or browne, 
Do's she smile, or do's she frowne ; 
Still I write a Sweet-heart downe. 

Be she rough, or smooth of skin ; 
When I touch, I then begin 
For to let Affection in. 

Be she bald, or do's she weare 
Locks incurl'd of other haire ; 
I shall find enchantment there. 

Be she whole, or be she rent. 
So my fancie be content. 
She's to me most excellent. 

Be she fat, or be she leane, 
Be she sluttish, be she cleane, 
I'm a man for ev'ry Sceane. 



Our own sinnes unseen. 

Other mens sins wee ever beare in mind ; 
None sees the fardell of his faults behind. 



No Paines, no Gaines. 

If little labour, little are our gaines : 
Mans fortunes are according to his paines. 

No Paines. i labour] Misprinted lalour 



Hesperides. 249 

Vertue best united. 

By so much, vertue is the lesse, 
By how much, neere to singlenesse. 

The eye. 

A wanton and lascivious eye 
Betrayes the Hearts Adulterie. 

To Prince Charles upon his coming to Exeter. 

What Fate decreed. Time now ha's made us see 

A Renovation of the West by Thee. 

That Preternaturall Fever, which did threat 

Death to our Countrey, now hath lost his heat : 

And calmes succeeding, we perceive no more S 

Th' unequall Pulse to beat, as heretofore. 

Something there yet remaines for Thee to do ; 

Then reach those ends that thou wast destin'd to. 

Go on with Sylla's Fortune ; let thy Fate 

Make Thee like Him, this, that way fortunate, lo 

Apollos Image side with Thee to blesse 

Thy Warre (discreetly made) with white successe. 

Meane time thy Prophets Watch by Watch shall pray ; 

While young Charles fights, and fighting wins the day. 

That done, our smooth-pac't Poems all shall be 15 

Sung in the high Doxologie of Thee. 

Then maids shall strew Thee, and thy Curies from them 

Receive (with Songs) a flowrie Diadem. 

A Song. 

Burne, or drowne me, choose ye whether, 

So I may but die together : 

Thus to slay me by degrees, 

Is the height of Cruelties. 

What needs twenty stabs, when one 5 

Strikes me dead as any stone ? 

O shew mercy then, and be 

Kind at once to mur4er mee, 



250 Hcsperides. 



Princes and Favourites. 

Princes and Fav'rites are most deere, while they 
By giving and receiving hold the play : 
But the Relation then of both growes poor, 
When These can aske, and Kings can give no more. 

Examples, or like Prince, like People. 

Examples lead us, and wee likely see, 
Such as the Prince is, will his People be. 

Potentates. 

Love and the Graces evermore do wait 
Upon the man that is a Potentate. 

The Wake. 

Come Anthea let us two 
Go to Feast, as others do. 
Tarts and Custards, Creams and Cakes, 
Are the Junketts still at Wakes : 
Unto which the Tribes resort. 
Where the businesse is the sport : 
Morris-dancers thou shalt see, 
Marian too in Pagentrie : 
And a Mimick to devise 
Many grinning properties. 
Players there will be, and those 
Base in action as in clothes : 
Yet with strutting they will please 
The incurious Villages. 
Neer the dying of the day, 
There will be a Cudgell-Vls.y, 
Where a Coxcomb will be broke. 
Ere a good word can be spoke : 
But the anger ends all here, 
Drencht in Ale, or drown'd in Beere. 
Happy Rusticks, best content 
With the cheapest Merriment : 
And possesse no other feare, 
Then to want the Wake next Yeare. 



Hesperides. 251 

The Feter-penny. 

Fresh strowings allow 

To my Sepulcher now. 
To make my lodging the sweeter ; 

A stafFe or a wand 

Put then in my hand, S 

With a pennie to pay S. Feter. 

Who has not a Crosse, 

Must sit with the losse, 
And no whit further must venture , 

Since the Porter he lo 

Will paid have his fee. 
Or els not one there must enter. 

Who at a dead lift. 

Can't send for a gift 
A Pig to the Priest for a Roster, 15 

Shall heare his Clarke say, 

By yea and by nay, 
No pennie, no Pater Nosier. 



To Doctor Alablaster. 

Nor art thou lesse esteem'd, that I have plac'd 

(Amongst mine honour'd) Thee (almost) the last : 

In great Processions many lead the way 

To him, who is the triumph of the day, 

As these have done to Thee, who art the one, 5 

One onely glory of a million. 

In whom the spirit of the Gods do's dwell, 

Firing thy soule, by which thou dost foretell 

When this or that vast Dinastie must fall 

Downe to a Fillit more Imperiall. 10 

When this or that Home shall be broke, and when 

Others shall spring up in their place agen : 

When times and seasons and all yeares must lie 

Drown'd in the Sea of wild Eternitie : 

When the Black Dooms-day Bookes (as yet unseal 'd) 15 

Shall by the mighty Angell be reveal'd : 



252 Hesperides. 



And when the Trumpet which thou late hast found 
Shall call to Judgment ; tell us when the sound 
Of this or that great Aprill day shall be, 
And next the Gospell wee will credit thee. 
Meane time like Earth-wormes we will craule below, 
And wonder at Those Things that thou dost know. 

Upon his Kinswoman Mrs. M. S. 

Here lies a Virgin, and as sweet 

As ere was wrapt in winding sheet. 

Her name if next you wo'd have knowne, 

The Marble speaks it Mary Stone : 

Who dying in her blooming yeares, 

This Stone, for names sake, melts to teares. 

If fragrant Virgins you'l but keep 

A Fast, wMle Jets and Marbles weep, 

And praying, strew some Roses on her, 

You'l do my JVei'ce abundant honour. 

Felicitie knowes no Fence. 

Of both our Fortunes good and bad we find 
Prosperitie more searching of the mind : 
Felicitie flies o're the Wall and Fence, 
While misery keeps in with patience. 

Death ends all woe. 

Time is the Bound of things, where e're we go. 
Fate gives a meeting. Death's the end of woe. 

A Conjuration., to Electra, 

By those soft Tods of wooll 
With which the aire is full : 
By all those Tinctures there. 
That paint the Hemisphere : 
By Dewes and drisling Raine, 
That swell the Golden Graine : 
By all those sweets that be 
r th flowrie Nunnerie ; 



Hesperides. 253 

By silent Nights, and the 

Three Formes of Heccate : ir 

By all Aspects that blesse 

The sober Sorceresse, 

While juice she straines, and pith 

To make her Philters with : 

By Time, that hastens on 15 

Things to perfection : 

And by your self, the best 

Conjurement of the rest : 

O my Electra ! be 

In love with none, but me. 20 

Courage cooVd. 

I cannot love, as I have lov'd before : 
For, I'm grown old ; &, with mine age, grown poore : 
Love must be fed by wealth : this blood of mine 
Must needs wax cold, if wanting bread and wine. 

The Spell, 

Holy Water come and bring ; 

Cast in Salt, for seasoning : 

Set the Brush for sprinkling : 

Sacred Spittle bring ye hither ; 

Meale and it now mix together; 5 

And a little Oyle to either : 

Give the Tapers here their light. 

Ring the Saints-Bell, to affright 

Far from hence the evill Sp'rite. 

His wish to privacie. 

Give me a Cell 

To dwell, 
Where no foot hath 

A path : 
There will I spend, 3 

And end 
My wearied yeares 

In teares. 



2 54 Hesperides. 

A good Husband. 

A master of a house (as I have read) 

Must be the first man up, and last in bed : 

With the Sun rising he must walk his grounds ; 

See this, View that, and all the other bounds : 

Shut every gate ; mend every hedge that's tome, 5 

Either with old, or plant therein new thorne : 

Tread ore his gleab, but with such care, that where 

He sets his foot, he leaves rich compost there. 

A Hymne to Bacchus. 

I sing thy praise lacckus, 

Who with thy Thyrse dost thwack us : 

And yet thou so dost back us 

With boldness that we feare 

No Brutus entring here ; 5 

Nor Cato the severe. 

What though the Lictors threat us, 

We know they dare not beate us ; 

So long as thou dost heat us. 

When we thy Orgies sing, 10 

Each Cobler is a King ; 

Nor dreads he any thing : 

And though he doe not rave, 

Yet he'l the courage have 

To call my Lord Maior knave , 15 

Besides too, in a brave. 

Although he has no riches. 

But walks with dangling breeches, 

And skirts that want their stiches. 

And shewes his naked flitches ; ao 

Yet he'le be thought or seen, 

So good as George-a-Green ; 

And calls his Blouze, his Queene ; 

And speaks in language keene : 

O Bacchus ! let us be 35 

From cares and troubles free ; 

And thou shalt heare how we 

Will chant new Hymnes to thee. 



Mesperides, 255 

Biame the reward of Princes. 

Among disasters that discention brings, 
This not the least is, which belongs to Kings. 
If Wars goe well ; each for a part layes claime : 
If ill, then Kings, not Souldiers beare the blame. 



Clemency in Kings. 

Kings must not only cherish up the good, 
But must be niggards of the meanest bloud. 



Anger. 

Wrongs, if neglected, vanish in short time ; 
But heard with anger, we confesse the crime. 



A Psalme or Hymne to the Graces. 

Glory be to the Graces ! 
That doe in publike places. 
Drive thence what ere encumbers, 
' The listning to my numbers. 

Honour be to the Graces ! 
Who doe with sweet embraces, 
Shew they are well contented 
With what I have invented. 

Worship be to the Graces ! 
Who do from sowre faces, 
And lungs that we'd infect me, 
For evermore protect me. 



256 Hesperides. 

An Hymne to the Muses. 

Honour to you who sit ! 
Neere to the well of wit ; 
And drink your fill of it. 

Glory and worship be ! 

To you sweet Maids (thrice three) 5 

Who still inspire me. 

And teach me how to sing 
Unto the Lyrick string 
My measures ravishing. 

Then while I sing your praise, le 

My Priest-hood crown with bayes 
Green, to the end of dayes. 

Upon Julia's Chthes. 

When as in silks vay Julia goes, 

Then, then (me thinks) how sweetly flowes 

That liquefaction of her clothes. 

Next, when I cast mine eyes and see 

That brave Vibration each way free ; 5 

O how that glittering taketh me ! 

Moderation. 

In things a moderation keepe. 

Kings ought to sheare, not skin their sheepe. 

To Anthea. 

Lets call for Hymen if agreed thou art ; 

Delays in love but crucifie the heart. 

Loves thornie Tapers yet neglected lye : 

Speak thou the word, they'l kindle by and by. 

The nimble bowers wooe us on to wed, 6 

And Genius waits to have us both to bed. 

Behold, for us the Naked Graces stay 

With maunds of roses for to strew the way ; 



Hesperides. 257 

Besides, the most religious Prophet stands 

Ready to joyne, as well our hearts as hands. lo 

Juno yet smiles ; but if she chance to chide, 

111 luck 'twill bode to th' Bridegroome and the Bride. 

Tell me Anthea, dost thou fondly dread 

The loss of that we call a Maydenhead ? 

€91116, He instruct thee. Know, the vestall fier 15 

Is not by mariage quencht, but flames the highera 



Upon Prew his Maid. 

In this little Urne is laid 
Prewdence Baldwin (once my maid) 
From whose happy spark here let 
Spring the purple Violet. 



The Invitation. 

To sup with thee thou didst me home invite ; 

And mad'st a promise that mine appetite 

Sho'd meet and tire, on such lautitious meat. 

The like not Heliogabalus did eat : 

And richer Wine wo'dst give to me (thy guest) 5 

Then Roman Sylla powr'd out at his feast. 

I came ; (tis true) and lookt for Fowle of price, 

The bastard Phenix ; bird of Paradice ; 

And for no less then Aromatick Wine 

Oi May dens-blush, commixt -with Jessimine. 10 

Cleane was the berth, the mantle larded jet ; 

Which wanting Lar, and smoke, hung weeping wet ; 

At last, i' th' noone of winter, did appeare 

A ragd-soust-neats-foot with sick vineger : 

And in a burnisht Flagonet stood by 15 

Beere small as Comfort, dead as Charity. 

At which amaz'd, and pondring on the food. 

How cold it was, and how it child my blood; 

I curst the master ; and I damn'd the souce ; 

And swore I'de got the ague of the house. ao 

Well, when to eat thou dost me next desire, 

I'le bring a Fever ; since thou keep'st no fire. 



258 Hesperides. 

Ceremonies for Christmasse. 

Come, bring with a noise, 

My merrie merrie boyes. 
The Christmas Log to the firing ; 

While my good Dame, she 

Bids ye all be free ; 5 

And drink to your hearts desiring. 

With the last yeeres brand 

Light the new block. And 
For good successe in his spending, 

On your Psaltries play, 10 

That sweet luck may 
Come while the Log is a teending. 

Drink now the strong Beere, 

Cut the white loafe here, 
The while the meat is a shredding ; 15 

For the rare Mince-Pie 

And the Plums stand by 
To fill the Paste that's a kneading. 



Christmasse-Eve, another 

Ceremonie. 

Come guard this night the Christmas-Pie, 
That the Thiefe, though ne'r so slie. 
With his Flesh-hooks, don't come nie 
To catch it. 

From him, who all alone sits there. 
Having his eyes still in his eare. 
And a deale of nightly feare 

To watch it. 

Another to the Maids. 

Wash your hands, or else the fire 
Will not teend to your desire; 
Unwasht hands, ye Maidens, know. 
Dead the Fire, though ye blow. 



Hesperides. 259 



Another. 

Wassaile the Trees, that they may beare 
You many a Plum, and many a Peare : 
For more or lesse fruits they will bring. 
As you doe give them Wassailing. 



Power and Peace. 

'Tis never, or hut seldome knowne, 
Power and Peace to keep one Throne. 



To his deare Valentine, Mistresse 
Margaret Falconbrige. 

Now is your turne (my Dearest) to be set 

A Jem in this eternall Coronet : 

'Twas rich before ; but since your Name is downe. 

It sparkles now like Ariadne's Crowne. 

Blaze by this Sphere for ever : Or this doe, 

Let Me and It shine evermore by you. 

To Oenone. 

Sweet Oenone, doe but say 
Love thou dost, though Love sayes Nay. 
Speak me faire ; for Lovers be 
Gently kill'd by Flatterie. 

Verses. 

Who will not honour Noble Numbers, when 
Verses out-live the bravest deeds of men ? 



Happinesse. 

That Happines do's still the longest thrive. 
Where Joyes and Griefs have Turns Alternative. 



2 6 o Hesperides. 

Things of choke, long a commtng. 

We pray 'gainst Warre, yet we enjoy no Peace 
Desire deferf'd is, that it may encrease. 

Poetry perpetuates the Poet. 

Here I my selfe might likewise die, 
And utterly forgotten lye, 
But that eternall Poetrie 
Repullulation gives me here 
Unto the thirtieth thousand yeere, 
When all now dead shall re-appeare. 

Kisses. 

Give me the food that satisfies a Guest : 
Kisses are but dry banquets to a Feast. 

Orpheus. 

Orpheus he went (as Poets tell) 

To fetch Euridice from Hell ; 

And had her ; but it was upon 

This short but strict condition : 

Backward he should not looke while he 

Led her through Hells obscuritie : 

But ah ! it hapned as he made 

His passage through that dreadfuU shade : 

Revolve he did his loving eye ; 

(For gentle feare, or jelousie) 

And looking back, that look did sever 

Him and Euridice for ever. 

To Sapho. 

Sapho, I will chuse to go 

Where the Northern Winds do blow 

Endlesse Ice, and endlesse Snow : 

Rather then I once wo'd see, 

But a Winters face in thee. 

To benumme my hopes and me. 



Hesperides. 261 

To his faithfull friend. Master John Crofts, 
Cup-bearer to the King. 

For all thy many courtesies to me, 

Nothing I have (my Crofts) to send to Thee 

For the requitall ; save this only one 

Haifa of my just remuneration. 

For since I've travail'd all this Realm throughout s 

To seeke, and find some few Immortals out 

To circumspangle this my spacious Sphere, 

(As Lamps for everlasting shining here :) 

And having fixt Thee in mine Orbe a Starre, 

(Amongst the rest) both bright and singular , lo 

The present Age will tell the world thou art 

If not to th' whole, yet satisfy'd in part. 

As for the rest, being too great a summe 

Here to be paid ; He pay't i'th'world to come. 

The Bride-Cake. 

This day my Julia thou must make 

For Mistresse Bride, the wedding Cake : 

Knead but the Dow and it will be 

To paste of Almonds turn'd by thee : 

Or kisse it thou, but once, or twice, 5 

And for the Bride-Cake ther'l be Spice. 

To be merry. 

Lets now take our time , 

While w'are in our Prime ; 
And old, old Age is a farre off: 

For the evill evill dayes 

Will come on apace ; S 

Before we can be aware of. 

Buriall. 

Man may want Land to live in ; but for all, 
Nature finds out some place for buriall 



262 Hesperides. 



Lenitie. 

'Tis the Chyrurgions praise, and height of Art, 
Not to cut off, but cure the vicious part. 



Penitence. 

Who after his transgression doth repent, 
Is halfe, or altogether innocent. 



Griefe. 

Consider sorrowes, how they are aright : 
Griefe, ift be great, 'tis short ; if long, 'tis light. 



The Maiden-blush. 

So look the mornings when the Sun 
Paints them with fresh Vermilion : 
So Cherries blush, and Kathern Peares, 
And Apricocks, in youthful! yeares : 
So Corrolls looke more lovely Red, 
And Rubies lately polished : 
So purest Diaper doth shine, 
Stain'd by the Beames of Clarret wine : 
Ks Julia looks when she doth dress 
Her either cheeke with bashfuUness. 



The Meane. 

Imparitie doth ever discord bring: 

The Mean the Musique makes in every thing. 

Haste hurtfull. 

Haste is unhappy : What we Rashly do 
Is both unluckie ; I, and foolish too. 
Where War with rashnesse is attempted, there 
The Soldiers leave the Field with equall feare. 



Hesperides. 263 

Purgatory. 



Readers wee entreat ye pray 

For the soule of Lucia ; 

That in little time she be 

From her Purgatory free : 

In th' intrim she desires 

That your teares may coole her fires. 



The Cloud. 

Seest thou that Cloud that rides in State 

Part Ruby-like, part Candidate ? 

It is no other then the Bed 

Where Venus sleeps (halfe smothered.) 



The Amber Bead. 

I saw a Flie within a Beade 

Of Amber cleanly buried : 

The Urne was little, but the room 

More rich then Cleopatra's Tombe. 



To my dearest Sister M. Mercie Herrlck. 

When ere I go, or what so ere befalls 

Me in mine Age, or forraign Funerals, 

This Blessing I will leave thee, ere I go. 

Prosper thy Basket, and therein thy Dow. 

Feed on the paste of Filberts, or else knead 6 

And Bake the floure of Amber for thy bread. 

Balm may thy Trees drop, and thy Springs runne oyle 

And everlasting Harvest crown thy Soile ! 

These I but wish for ; but thy selfe shall see. 

The Blessing fall in mellow times on Thee. lo 

Purgatory, i entreat] Misprinted entsaX 



2 64 Hesperides. 



The 'Transfiguration. 

Immortall clothing I put on, 
So soone as Julia I am gon 
To mine eternall Mansion. 

Thou, thou art here, to humane sight 
Cloth'd all with incorrupted light ; 
But yet how more admir'dly bright 

Wilt thou appear, when thou art set 

In thy refulgent Thronelet, 

That shin'st thus in thy counterfeit ? 



Suffer that thou canst not shift. 

Do's Fortune rend thee ? Beare with thy hard Fate : 
Vertuous instructions n^r are delicate. 
Say, do's she frown ? still countermand her threats : 
Vertue best loves those children that she beates. 



To the Passenger. 

If I lye unburied Sir, 

These my Reliques, (pray) interre. 

'Tis religious part to see 

Stones, or turfes to cover me. 

One word more I had to say ; 6 

But it skills not ; go your way ; 

He that wants a buriall roome 

For a Stone, ha's Heaven his Tombe, 

To tke Passenger. 3 religious] religions or xeVigion'i conj. Pollard {probably 
rightly) 



Hesperides. 265 

TO THE KING, 

Upon his taking of Leicester. 

This Day is Yours Great CHARLES ! and in this War 

Your Fate, and Ours, alike Victorious are. 

In her white Stole ; now Victory do's rest 

Enspher'd with Palm on Your Triumphant Crest. 

Fortune is now Your Captive ; other Kings 5 

Hold but her hands ; You hold both hands and wings. 

To Julia, in her Dawn, or Day-breake. 

By the next kindling of the day 

My Julia thou shalt see, 
Ere Ave-Mary thou canst say 

He come and visit thee. 

Yet ere thou counsel'st with thy Glasse, 5 

Appeare thou to mine eyes 
As smooth, and nak't, as she that was 

The prime of Faradice. 

If blush thou must, then blush thou through 

A Lawn, that thou mayst looke lo 

As purest Pearles, or Pebles do 

When peeping through a Brooke. 

As Lillies shrin'd in Christall, so 

Do thou to me appeare ; 
Or Damask Roses, when they grow 15 

To sweet acquaintance there. 

Counsell. 

'Twas Cesars saying : Kings no lesse Conquerors are 
By their wise Counsell, then they be by Warre. 



2 66 Hesperides. 

Bad Princes pill their People. 

Like those infernall Deities which eate 

The best of all the sacrificed meate ; 

And leave their servants, but the smoak & sweat : 

So many Kings, and Primates too there are. 

Who claim the Fat, and Fleshie for their share, ; 

And leave their subjects but the starved ware. 

Most JVordSy lesse Workes. 

In desp'rate cases, all, or most are known 
Commanders, ^z£;/(?r execution. 

To Dianeme. 

I co'd but see thee yesterday 

Stung by a fretfull Bee ; 
And I the Javelin suckt away, 

And heal'd the wound in thee. 

A thousand thorns, and Bryars & Stings, 5 

I have in my poore Brest ; 
Yet ne'r can see that salve which brings 

My Passions any rest. 

As Love shall helpe me, I admire 

How thou canst sit and smile, 10 

To see me bleed, and not desire 

To stench the blood the while. 

If thou compos'd of gentle mould 

Art so unkind to me ; 
What dismall Stories will be told 15 

Of those that cruell be ? 

His Losse. 

All has been plundered from me, but my wit ; 
Fortune her selfe can lay no claim to it. 

Draw, and Drinke. 

Milk stil your Fountains, and your Springs, for why ? 
The more th'are drawn, the lesse they wil grow dry. 



Hesperides 267 



To Oenone. 

Thou sayest Loves Dart 

Hath prickt thy heart ; 
And thou do'st languish too : 

If one poore prick, 

Can make thee sick, 
Say, what wo'd many do ? 

To Electra. 

Shall I go to Love and tell, 
Thou art all turn'd isicle ? 
Shall I say her Altars be 
Disadorn'd, and scorn'd by thee? 
O beware ! in time submit ; 
Love has yet no wrathfull fit : 
If her patience turns to ire, 
Love is then consuming fire. 

To Misiresse Amie Potter. 

Ai me ! I love, give him your hand to kisse 

Who both your wooer, and your Poet is. 

Nature has pre-compos'd us both to Love ; 

Your part's to grant ; my Scean must be to move. 

Deare, can you like, and liking love your Poet ? 

If you say (I) Blush-guiltinesse will shew it. 

Mine eyes must wooe you ; (though I sigh the while) 

True Love is tonguelesse as a Crocodile. 

And you may find in Love these differing Parts ; 

Wooers have Tonnes of Ice, but burning hearts. 

Upon a Maide. 

Here she lyes (in Bed of Spice) 
Faire as £^ve in Paradice : 
For her beauty it was such 
Poets co'd not praise too much. 
Virgins Come, and in a Ring 
Her supreamest Requiem sing ; 
Then depart, but see ye tread 
Lightly, lightly ore the dead. 



2 68 Hesperides. 

Upon Love. 

Love is a Circle, and an Endlesse Sphere ; 
From good to good, revolving here, & there. 

Beauty. 

Beauti's no other but a lovely Grace 
Of lively colours, flowing from the face. 

Upon Love. 

Some salve to every sore, we may apply ; 
Only for my wound there's no remedy. 
Yet if \ay Julia kisse me, there will be 
A soveraign balme found out to cure me. 



To his Booke. 

Make haste away, and let one be 

A friendly Patron unto thee : 

Lest rapt from hence, I see thee lye 

Torn for the use of Pasterie : 

Or see thy injur'd Leaves serve well, 

To make loose Gownes for Mackarell : 

Or see the Grocers in a trice. 

Make hoods of thee to serve out Spice. 

Readinesse. 

The readinesse of doing, doth expresse 
No other, but the doers willingnesse. 

Writing. 

When words we want. Love teacheth to endite ; 
And what we blush to speake, she bids us write. 

Society. 

Two things do make society to stand ; 

The first Commerce is, & the next Command. 



Hesperides. 269 

Upon a Maid. 

Gone she is a long, long way, 

But she has decreed a day 

Back to come, (and make no stay.) 

So we keepe till her returne 

Here, her ashes, or her Urne. 6 

Satisfaction for sufferings. 

For all our workes, a recompence is sure : 
'Tis sweet to thinke on what was hard f endure. 

The delaying Bride. 

Why so slowly do you move 

To the centre of your love ? 

On your niceness though we wait, 

Yet the houres say 'tis late : 

Coynesse takes us to a measure ; 5 

But o'racted deads the pleasure. 

Go to Bed, and care not when 

Cheerfull day shall spring agen. 

One Brave Captain did command, 

(By his word) the Sun to stand : 10 

One short charme if you but say 

Will enforce the Moon to stay, 

Till you warn her hence (away) 

T'ave your blushes seen by day. 

To M. Henry Lawes, the excellent 

Composer of his Lyricks. 

Touch but thy Lire (my Harrie) and I heare 

From thee some raptures of the rare Gotire, 

Then if thy voice commingle with the String 

I heare in thee rare Laniere to sing ; 

Or curious Wilson : Tell me, canst thou be S 

Less then Apollo, that ursurp'st such Three ? 

Three, unto whom the whole world give applause ; 

Yet their Three praises, praise but One ; that's Lawes. 

To M. Henry Lawes. 4 thee rare] thee the rare 164&: corrected in the 
irigtnal Errata 



270 Hesperides. 

Age unfit fir Love 

Maidens tell me I am old ; 
Let me in my Glasse behold 
Whether smooth or not I be, 
Or if haire remaines to me. 
Well, or be't or be't not so. 
This for certainty I know ; 
111 it fits old men to play, 
When that Death bids come away. 



'The Bed-man, or Grave-maker. 

Thou hast made many Houses for the Dead ; 
When my Lot calls me to be buried, 
For Love or Pittie, prethee let there be 
I'th' Church-yard, made, one Tenement for me. 



To Anthea, 

Anthea I am going hence 
With some small stock of innocence : 
But yet those blessed gates I see 
Withstanding entrance unto me. 
To pray for me doe thou begin, 
The Porter then will let me in. 



Need. 

Who begs to die for feare of humane need, 
Wisheth his body, not his soule, good speed. 



To Julia. 

I am zeallesse, prethee pray 
For my well-fare (Julia) 
For I thinke the gods require 
Male perfumes, but Female fire. 



Hesperides. 271 

On Julias lips. 



Sweet are ray Julia's lips and cleane, 
As if or'e washt in Hippocrene. 

Twilight. 

Twilight, no other thing is, Poets say. 
Then the last part of night, and first of day. 

To his Friend, Master J. Jincks. 

Love, love me now, because I place 
Thee here among my righteous race : 
The bastard Slips may droop and die 
Wanting both Root, and Earth ; but thy 
Immortall selfe, shall boldly trust 
To live for ever, with my Just. 

On himselfe. 

If that my Fate has now fulfill'd my yeere, 
And so soone stopt my longer living here ; 
What was't (ye Gods !) a dying man to save, 
But while he met with his Paternall grave ; 
Though while we living 'bout the world do roame, 
We love to rest in peacefuU Urnes at home, 
Where we may snug, and close together lye 
By the dead bones of our deare Ancestrie. 

Kings and Tyrants. 

'Twixt Kings & Tyrants there's this difference known ; 
Kings seek their Subjects good : Tyrants their owne. 

Crosses. 

Our Crosses are no other then the rods, 
And our Diseases, Vultures of the Gods : 
Each griefe we feele, that likewise is a Kite 
Sent forth by them, our flesh to eate, or bite. 



272 Hesperides. 

Upon Love. 

Love brought me to a silent Grove, 

And shew'd me there a Tree, 
Where some had hang'd themselves for love. 

And gave a Twist to me. 

The Halter was of silk, and gold, S 

That he reacht forth unto me : 
No otherwise, then if he would 

By dainty things undo me. 

He bade me then that Neck-lace use ; 

And told me too, he maketh 10 

A glorious end by such a Noose, 

His Death for Love that taketh. 

'Twas but a dream ; but had I been 

There really alone ; 
My desp'rate feares, in love, had seen 15 

Mine Execution. 



No difference t tK dark. 

Night makes no difference 'twixt the Priest and Clark ; 
Jone as my Lady is as good i'th' dark. 



The Body. 

The Body is the Soules poore house, or home, 
Whose Ribs the Laths are, & whose Flesh the Loame. 



To Sapho. 

Thou saist thou lov'st me Sapho ; I say no , 
But would to Love I could beleeve 'twas so ! 
Pardon my feares (sweet Sapho,) I desire 
That thou be righteous found ; and I the Lyer. 



Hesperides. 273 

Out of Time, out of Tune. 

We blame, nay we despise her paines 

That wets her Garden when it raines : 

But when the drought has dri'd the knot ; 

Then let her use the watring pot. 

We pray for showers (at our need) 5 

To drench, but not to drown our seed. 



To his Booke. 

Take mine advise, and go not neere 
Those faces (sower as Vineger.) 
For these, and Nobler numbers can 
Ne'r please the supercilious man. 

To his Honour d friend. Sir Thomas Heale. 

Stand by the Magick of my powerfull Rhymes 
'Gainst all the indignation of the Times. 
Age shall not wrong thee ; or one jot abate 
Of thy both Great, and everlasting fate. 
While others perish, here's thy life decreed 
Because begot of my Immortall seed. 

The Sacrifice by way of "Discourse betwixt 

himselfe and Julia. 

Herr. Come and let's in solemn wise 
Both addresse to sacrifice : 
Old Religion first commands 
That we wash our hearts, and hands. 
Is the beast exempt from staine. 
Altar cleane, no fire prophane ? 
Are the Garlands, Is the Nard 
Ready here? Jul. All well prepar'd, 
With the Wine that must be shed 
(Twixt the homes) upon the head 
Of the holy Beast we bring 
(For our Trespasse-offering. 

To his Honour' d friend. 5 here's] Misprinted her'es 
T 



2 74 Hesperides. 



Herr. All is well ; now next to these 
Put we on pure Surplices ; 

And with Chaplets crown'd, we'l rest 15 

With perfumes the Holocaust : 
And (while we the gods invoke) 
Reade acceptance by the smoake. 

To Apollo. 

Thou mighty Lord and master of the Lyre, 
Unshorn Apollo, come, and re-inspire 
My fingers so, the Lyrick-strings to move. 
That I may play, and sing a Hymne to Love. 



On Love. 

Love is a kind of warre ; Hence those who feare. 
No cowards must his royall Ensignes beare. 



Another. 

Where love begins, there dead thy first desire : 
A sparke neglected makes a mighty fire. 

An Hymne to Cupid. 

Thou, thou that bear'st the sway 

With whom the Sea-Nimphs play ; 

And Venus, every way : 

When I embrace thy knee ; 

And make short pray'rs to thee : 5 

In love, then prosper me. 

This day I goe to wooe ; 

Instruct me how to doe 

This worke thou put'st me too. 

From shame my face keepe free, 10 

From scorne I begge of thee, 

Love to deliver me : 

So shall I sing thy praise ; 

And to thee Altars raise, 

Unto the end of daies. 15 



Hesperides. 275 



To Electra. 

Let not thy Tomb-stone er'e be laid by me : 
Nor let my Herse, be wept upon by thee : 
But let that instant when thou dy'st be known, 
The minute of mine expiration. 
One knell be rung for both ; and let one grave 
To hold us two, an endlesse honour have. 



How his souk came ensnared. 

My soule would one day goe and seeke 
For Roses, and in Julia's cheeke, 
A richess of those sweets she found, 
(As in an other Rosamond^ 
But gathering Roses as she was ; 
(Not knowing what would come to passe) 
It chanst a ringlet of her haire, 
Caught my poore soule, as in a snare : 
Which ever since has been in thrall, 
Yet freedome, shee enjoyes withall. 



Factions. 

The factions of the great ones call, 
To side with them, the Commons all. 



Upon Julia's haire^ bundled up in a 
golden net. 

Tell me, what needs those rich deceits. 
These golden Toyles, and Trammel-nets, 
To take thine haires when they are knowne 
Already tame, and all thine owne ? 
'Tis I am wild, and more then haires 
Deserve these Mashes and those snares. 
Set free thy Tresses, let them flow 
As aires doe breathe, or winds doe blow : 
And let such curious Net-works be 
Lesse set for them, then spred for me. 



276 Hesperides. 



The showre of Blossomes. 

Love in a showre of Blossomes came 
Down, and halfe drown'd me with the same : 
The Blooms that fell were white and red ; 
But with such sweets commingled, 
As whether (this) I cannot tell 
My sight was pleas'd more, or my smell : 
But true it was, as I rowl'd there, 
Without a thought of hurt, or feare ; 
Love turn'd himselfe into a Bee, 
And with his Javelin wounded me : 
From which mishap this use I make, 
Where most sweets are, there lyes a Snake. 
Kisses and Favours are sweet things ; 
But Those have thorns, and These have stings. 



A defence for Women. 

Naught are all Women : I say no, 
Since for one Bad, one Good I know : 
For Clytemnestra most unkind. 
Loving Akestis there we find : 
For one Medea that was bad, 
A good Penelope was had : 
For wanton Lais, then we have 
Chaste Lucrece, or a wife as grave : 
And thus through Woman-kind we see 
A Good and Bad. Sirs credit me. 



Slavery. 

'Tis liberty to serve one I^ord ; but he 
Who many serves, serves base servility. 

A defence for Women. 8 wife] wise i6i8 : corrected in original Ei-raia 



Hesperides. 277 



Charmes. 

Bring the holy crust of Bread, 
Lay it underneath the head ; 
'Tis a certain Charm to keep 
Hags away, while Children sleep. 



Another. 

Let the superstitious wife 
Neer the childs heart lay a knife : 
Point be up, and Haft be downe ; 
(While she gossips in the towne) 
This 'mongst other mystick charms 
Keeps the sleeping child from harms. 



Another Charme for Stables. 

Hang up Hooks, and Sheers to scare 
Hence the Hag, that rides the Mare, 
Till they be all over wet. 
With the mire, and the sweat : 
This observ'd, the Manes shall be 
Of your horses, all knot-free. 



Ceremonies for Candlemasse Eve. 

Down with the Rosemary and Bayes, 
Down with the Misleto ; 

In stead of Holly, now up-raise 

The greener Box (for show.) 

The Holly hitherto did sway ; 

Let Box now domineere ; 
Untill the dancing Easter-day, 

Or Easters Eve appeare. 



278 Hesperides. 

Then youthful! Box which now hath grace, 

Your houses to renew ; 10 

Grown old, surrender must his place, 

Unto the crisped Yew. 

When Yew is out, then Birch comes in, 

And many Flowers beside ; 
Both of a fresh, and fragrant kinne 15 

To honour Whitsontide. 

Green Rushes then, and sweetest Bents, 

With cooler Oken boughs ; 
Come in for comely ornaments, 

To re-adorn the house. 20 

Thus times do shift ; each thing his turne do's hold ; 
New things succeed, as former things grow old. 



The Ceremonies for Candlemasse day. 

Kindle the Christmas Brand, and then 

Till Sunne-set, let it burne ; 
Which quencht, then lay it up agen, 

Till Christmas next returne. 
Part must be kept wherewith to teend 

The Christmas Log next yeare ; 
And where 'tis safely kept, the Fiend, 

Can do no mischiefe (there.) 



Upon Candlemasse day. 

End now the White-loafe, & the Pye, 
And let all sports with Christmas dye. 



Surfeits. 

Bad are all surfeits : but Physitians call 
That surfeit tooke by bread, the worst of all. 



Hesperides. 279 

To Biancha, to blesse him. 

Wo'd I wooe, and wo'd I winne, 

Wo'd I well my worke begin? 

Wo'd I evermore be crown d 

With the end that I propound ? 

Wo'd I frustrate, or prevent 5 

All Aspects malevolent ? 

Thwart all Wizzards, and with these 

Dead all black contingencies : 

Place my words, and all works else 

In most happy Parallels ? 10 

All will prosper, if so be 

I be kist, or blest by thee. 



Julia's Churching, or Purification. 

Put on thy Holy Fillitings, and so 

To th' Temple with the sober Midwife go. 

Attended thus (in a most solemn wise) 

By those who serve the Child-bed misteries. 

Burn first thine incense ; next, when as thou see'st 5 

The candid Stole thrown ore the Pious Priest ; 

With reverend Curtsies come, and to him bring 

Thy free (and not decurted) offering. 

All Rites well ended, with faire Auspice come 

(As to the breaking of a Bride-Cake) home ; 10 

Where ceremonious Hymen shall for thee 

Provide a second Efiithalamie. 

She who keeps chasily to her husbands side 

Is not for one, but every night his Bride : 

And stealing still with love, andfeare to Bed, 15 

Brings him not one, but many a Maiden-head, 



To his Book. 

Before the Press scarce one co'd see 
A little-peeping-part of thee : 
But since th' art Printed, thou dost call, 
To shew thy nakedness to all. 



2 8 o Hesperides. 

My care for thee is now the less ; 
(Having resign'd thy shamefac'tness :) 
Go with thy Faults and Fates ; yet stay 
And take this sentence, then away ; 
Whom one belov'd will not suffice, 
She'l runne to all adulteries. 



Teares. 

Teares most prevaile ; with teares too thou mayst move 
Rocks to relent, and coyest maids to love. 



'To his friend to avoid contention of words. 

Words beget Anger : Anger brings forth blowes : 
Blowes make of dearest friends immortall Foes. 
For which prevention (Sociate) let there be 
Betwixt us two no more Logomachie. 
Farre better 'twere for either to be mute, 
Then for to murder friendship, by dispute. 



Truth. 

Truth is best found out by the time, and eyes ; 
Falsehood winnes credit by uncertainties. 



The Eyes before the Eares. 

We credit most our sight ; one eye doth please 
Our trust farre more then ten eare-witnesses. 



fFant. 

Want is a softer Wax, that takes thereon, 
This, that, and every base impression. 

The Eyes, &c. 2 then ten] ten then 1648 (a printers error). 



Hesperides. 281 



To a Friend. 

Looke in my Book, and herein see, 
Life endlesse sign'd to thee and me. 
We o're the tombes, and Fates shall flye ; 
While other generations dye. 



Upon M. William Lawes, ike rare Musitian. 

Sho'd I not put on Blacks, when each one here 
Comes with his Cypresse, and devotes a teare ? 
Sho'd I not grieve (my Lawes) when every Lute, 
Violl, and Voice, is (by thy losse) struck mute ? 
Thy loss brave man 1 whose Numbers have been hurl'd, 
And no less prais'd, then spread throughout the world. 
Some have Thee call'd Amphion ; some of us, 
Nam'd thee Terpander, or sweet Orpheus : 
Some this, some that, but all in this agree, 
Musique had both her birth, and death with Thee. 



A song upon Silvia. 

From me my Silvia ranne away, 
And running therewithall ; 

A Primrose Banke did cross her way, 
And gave my Love a fall. 

But trust me now I dare not say, 
What I by chance did see ; 

But such the Drap'ry did betray 
That fully ravisht me. 



The Hony-combe. 

If thou hast found an honie-combe, 
Eate thou not all, but taste on some : 
For if thou eat'st it to excess ; 
That sweetness turnes to Loathsomness. 
Taste it to Temper ; then 'twill be 
Marrow, and Manna unto thee. 



282 Hesperides. 

Upon Ben. Johnson. 

Here \ye& Johnson with the rest 

Of the Poets ; but the Best. 

Reader, wo'dst thou more have known ? 

Aske his Story, not this Stone. 

That will speake what this can't tell 5 

Of his glory. So farewell. 

An Ode for him. 

Ah Ben ! 
Say how, or when 
Shall we thy Guests 
Meet at those Lyrick Feasts, 

Made at the Sun, 5 

The Dog, the triple Tunne ? 

Where we such clusters had. 

As made us nobly wild, not mad ; 

And yet each Verse of thine 

Out-did the meate, out-did the frolick wine. 10 

My Ben 
Or come agen : 
Or send to us, 
Thy wits great over-plus ; 

But teach us yet 15 

Wisely to husband it ; 
Lest we that Tallent spend : 
And having once brought to an end 
That precious stock ; the store 
Of such a wit the world sho'd have no more. 20 

Upon a Firgin. 

Spend Harmless shade thy nightly Houres, 

Selecting here, both Herbs, and Flowers ; 

Of which make Garlands here, and there, 

To dress thy silent sepulchre. 

Nor do thou feare the want of these, 5 

In everlasting Properties. 

Since we fresh strewings will bring hither, 

Farre faster then the first can wither. 



Hesperides. 283 



Blame. 

In Battailes what disasters fall, 

The King he beares the blame of all. 



A request to the Graces. 

Ponder my words, if so that any be 
Known guilty here of incivility : 
Let what is graceless, discompos'd, and rude, 
With sweetness, smoothness, softness, be endu'd. 
Teach it to blush, to curtsie, lisp, and shew 
Demure, but yet, full of temptation too. 
Numbers ne'r tickle, or but lightly please, 
Unlesse they have some wanton carriages. 
This if ye do, each Piece will here be good, 
And gracefuU made, by your neate Sisterhood. 



Upon himselfe. 

I lately fri'd, but now behold 
I freeze as fast, and shake for cold. 
And in good faith I'd thought it strange 
T'ave found in me this sudden change 
But that I understood by dreames. 
These only were but Loves extreames ; 
Who fires with hope the Lovers heart. 
And starves with cold the self- same part. 



Multitude. 

We Trust not to the multitude in Warre, 
But to the stout ; and those that skilfull are. 



Feare. 

Man must do well out of a good intent. 
Not for the servile feare of punishment. 



284 Hesperides. 



To M. Kellam. 

What can my Kellam drink his Sack 
In Goblets to the brim, 

And see his Robin Herrick lack, 
Yet send no Boules to him ? 

For love or pitie to his Muse, 

(That she may flow in Verse) 

Contemne to recommend a Cruse, 
But send to her a Tearce. 



Happinesse to hospitalitie, or a hearty 
wish to good house-keeping. 

First, may the hand of bounty bring 

Into the daily oflfering 

Of full provision ; such a store, 

Till that the Cooke cries, Bring no more. 

Upon your hogsheads never fall S 

A drought of wine, ale, beere (at all) 

But, like full clouds, may they from thence 

Diffuse their mighty influence. 

Next, let the Lord, and Ladie here 

Enjoy a Christning yeare by yeare ; ro 

And this good blessing back them still, 

T'ave Boyes, and Gyrles too, as they will. 

Then from the porch may many a Bride 

Unto the Holy Temple ride : 

And thence return, (short prayers seyd) 15 

A wife most richly married. 

Last, may the Bride and Bridegroome be 

Untoucht by cold sterility ; 

But in their springing blood so play. 

As that in Lusters few they may, 30 

By laughing too, and lying downe. 

People a City or a Towne. 



Hesperides. 285 

Cunctation in Correction. 

The Lictors bundl'd up their rods : beside, 
Knit them with knots (with much adoe unty'd) 
That if (unknitting) men wo'd yet repent, 
They might escape the lash of punishment. 

Present Government grievous. 

Men are suspicious ; prone to discontent : 
Subjects still loath the present Government. 

Rest Refreshes. 

Lay by the good a while ; a resting field 

Will, after ease, a richer harvest yeild : 

Trees this year beare ; next, they their wealth with-hold : 

Continuall reaping makes a land wax old. 

Revenge. 

Mans disposition is for to requite 
An injurie, before a benefite : 
Thanksgiving is a burden, and a paine ; 
Revenge is pleasing to us, as our gaine. 

The first marrs or makes. 

In all our high designments, 'twill appeare, 
The first event breeds confidence orfeare. 

Beginning., difficult. 

Hard are the two first staires unto a Crowne ; 
Which got, the third, bids him a King come downe. 

Faith four-square. 

Faith is a thing that's four-square ; let it fall 
This way or that, it not declines at all. 



286 Hesperides, 

The present time best pleaseth. 

Praise they that will Times past, I joy to see 
My selfe now live : this age best pleaseth mee. 



Cloathes, are conspirators. 

Though from without no foes at all we feare ; 
We shall be wounded by the cloathes we weare. 



Cruelp^. 

Tis but a dog-like madnesse in bad Kings, 
For to delight in wounds and murderings. 
As some plants prosper best by cuts and biowes ; 
So Kings by killing doe encrease their foes. 



Faire after foule. 

Teares quickly drie : grief es will in time decay : 
A cleare will come after a cloudy day. 



Hunger. 

Aske me what hunger is, and He reply, 
'Tis but a fierce desire of hot and drie. 



Bad wages for good service. 

In this misfortune Kings doe most excel], 

To heare the worst from men, when they doe well. 



The End. 

Conquer we shall, but we must first contend ; 
^Tis not the Fight that crowns us, but the end. 



Hesperides. 287 



The Bondman. 

Bind me but to thee with thine haire, 

And quickly I shall be 
Made by that fetter or that snare 

A bondman unto thee. 

Or if thou tak'st that bond away, 

Then bore me through the eare ; 

And by the Law I ought to stay 
For ever with thee here. 



Choose for the best. 

Give house-roome to the best ; ' Tis never ktiown 
Vertue and pleasure, both to dwell in one. 



To Silvia. 

Pardon my trespasse (Silvia) I confesse, 
My kisse out-went the bounds of shamfastnesse : 
None is discreet at all times ; no, not Jove 
Himselfe, at one time, can be wise, and Love- 



Faire shewes deceive. 

Smooth was the Sea, and seem'd to call 

To prettie girles to play withall : 

Who padling there, the Sea soone frown'd, 

And on a sudden both were drown'd. 

What credit can we give to seas, 

Who, kissing, kill such Saints as these ? 



His wish. 

Fat be my Hinde ; unlearned be my wife ; 
Peacefull by night ; my day devoid of strife ; 
To these a comely off-spring I desire, 
Singing about my everlasting fire. 



2 88 Hesperides. 

Upon Julia's washing her self in the river. 

How fierce was I, when I did see 

M.-'j Julia wash her self in thee ! 

So Lillies thorough Christall look : 

So purest pebbles in the brook : 

As in the 'SXv&t Julia did, g 

Halfe with a Lawne of water hid, 

Into thy streames my self I threw. 

And strugling there, I kist thee too ; 

And more had done (it is confest) 

Had not thy waves forbad the rest. lo 

A Meane in our Meanes. 

Though Frankinsense the Deities require, 
We must not give all to the hallowed fire. 
Such be our gifts, and such be our expence, 
As for our selves to leave some frankinsence. 

Upon Clunn. 

A rowle of Parchment Clunn about him beares, 

Charg'd with the Armes of all his Ancestors : 

And seems halfe ravisht, when he looks upon 

That Bar, this Bend ; that Fess, this Cheveron ; 

This Manch, that Moone ; this Martlet, and that Mound; 5 

This counterchange of Perle and Diamond. 

What joy can Clun have in that Coat, or this, 

When as his owne still out at elboes is ? 

Upon Cupid. 

Love, like a Beggar, came to me 

With Hose and Doublet torne : 
His Shirt bedangling from his knee. 

With Hat and Shooes out-worne. 

He askt an almes ; I gave him bread, 5 

And meat too, for his need : 
Of which, when he had fully fed, 

He wished me all Good speed. 



Hesperides. 289 

. Away he went, but as he turn'd 

(In faith I know not how) lo 

He toucht me so, as that I burn, 
And am tormented now. 

Love's silent flames, and fires obscure 

Then crept into my heart ; 
And though I saw no Bow, I'm sure, 15 

His finger was the dart. 



An Hymne to Lave. 

1. I will confesse 
With Cheerfulnesse, 

Love is a thing so likes me, 

That let her lay 

On me all day, 5 

He kiss the hand that strikes me. 

2. I will not, I, 

Now blubb'ring, cry, 
It (Ah !) too late repents me 

That I did fall 10 

To love at all, 
Since love so much contents me. 

3. No, no, He be 
In fetters free ; 

While others they sit wringing 15 

Their hands for paine ; 

He entertaine 
The wounds of love with singing. 

4. With Flowers and Wine, 

And Cakes Divine, ac 

To strike me I will tempt thee : 

Which done ; no more 

He come before 
Thee and thine Altars emptie. 



2go Hes^erides. 



To his honoured and most Ingenious friend 
Mr. Charles Cotton. 

For brave comportment, wit without offence, 

Words fully flowirig, yet of influence : 

Thou art that man of men, the man alone. 

Worthy the Publique Admiration : 

Who with thine owne eyes read'st what we doe write, 

And giv'st our Numbers Euphonic, and weight. 

Tel'st when a Verse springs high, how understood 

To be, or not borne of the Royall-blood. 

What State above, what Symmetrie below, 

Lines have, or sho'd have, thou the best canst show. 

For which (my Charles) it is niy pride to be. 

Not so much knowne, as to be lov'd of thee. 

Long may I live so, and my wreaith Gf Bayes, 

Be lesse anothers Laurell, 'then thy praise. 

Women uselesse. 

What need we marry Women, when 

Without their use we may have men ? 

And such as will in short time be, 

For murder fit, or mutinie ; 

As Cadmus once a new way found. 

By throwing teeth into the ground : 

(From which poore seed, and rudely sown) 

Sprung up a War-like Nation. 

So let us Yron, Silver, Gold, 

Brasse, Leade, or Tinne, throw into th' mould ; 

And we shall see in little space 

Rise up of men, a fighting race. 

If this can be, say then, what need 

Have we of Women or their seed ? 



Love is a sirrup. 

Love is a sirrup ; and who er'e We see 
Sick and surcharg'd with this Sacietie : 
Shall by this pleasing trespasse quickly prove, 
Thet's loathsomnesse den in the sweets of love. 



Hesperides. 291 



Leven. 

Love is a Leven, and a loving kisse 
The Leven of a loving sweet-heart is. 



Repletion. 

Physitians say Repletion springs 

More from the sweet then sower things. 



On Himself e. 

Weepefor the dead, for they have lost this light: 
And weepe for me, lost in an endlesse night. 
Or mourne, or make a Marble Verse for me, 
Who writ for many. BeneMcite. 



No man without Money. 

No man such rare parts hath, that he can swim, 
If favour or occasion helpe not him. 



On Himselfe. 

Lost to the world ; lost to my selfe ; alone 
Here now I rest under this Marble stone : 
In depth of silence, heard, and seene of none. 



To M. Leonard Willan his 

peculiar friend. 

I will be short, and having quickly hurl'd 

This line about, live Thou throughout the world ; 

Who art a man for all Sceanes ; unto whom 

(What's hard to others) nothing's troublesome. 

Can'st write the Comtek, Tragick straine, and fall 

From these to,penne the pleasing Pastprall : 

Who fli'st at ail heights : Prose and Verse run'st through 



2 92 Hesperides. 



Find'st here a fault, and mend'st the trespasse too : 
For which I might extoll thee, but speake lesse. 
Because thy selfe art comming to the Presse : 
And then sho'd I in praising thee be slow. 
Posterity will pay thee what I owe. 

To his worthy friend M. John Hall, 
Student of Grayes-Inne. 

Tell me young man, or did the Muses bring 

Thee lesse to taste, then to drink up their spring ; 

That none hereafter sho'd be thought, or be 

A Poet, or a Poet-like but Thee. 

What was thy Birth, thy starre that makes thee knowne. 

At twice ten yeares, a prime and publike one ? 

Tell us thy Nation, kindred, or the whence 

Thou had'st, and hast thy mighty influence. 

That makes thee lov'd, and of the men desir'd, 

And no lesse prais'd, then of the maides admir'd. 

Put on thy Laurell then ; and in that trimme 

Be thou Apollo, or the type of him : 

Or let the Unshorne God lend thee his Lyre, 

And next to him, be Master of the Quire. 

To Julia. 

Offer thy gift ; but first the Law commands 
Thee Julia, first, to sanctifie thy hands : 
Doe that xn-^ Julia which the rites require. 
Then boldly give thine incense to the fire. 

To the most comely and proper 
M. Elizabeth Finch. 

Hansome you are, and Proper you will be 

Despight of all your infortunitie : 

Live long and lovely, but yet grow no lesse 

In that your owne prefixed comelinesse : 

Spend on that stock : and when your life must fall. 

Leave others Beauty, to set up withall. 



Hesperides, 293 



To his Booke. 

If hap it must, that I must see thee lye 
Absyrius-\\k& all torne confusedly : 
With solemne tears, and with much grief of heart, 
He recollect thee (weeping) part by part ; 
And having washt thee, close thee in a chest 
With spice ; that done, He leave thee to thy rest 



TO THE KING, 

upon his welcome to Hampton-Court. 

Set and Sung. 

Welcome, Great Cesar, welcome now you are, 

As dearest Peace, after destructive Warre : 

Welcome as slumbers ; or as beds of ease 

After our long, and peevish sicknesses. 

O Pompe of Glory ! Welcome now, and come 5 

To re-possess once more your long'd-for home. 

A thousand Altars smoake ; a thousand thighes 

Of Beeves here ready stand for Sacrifice. 

Enter and prosper ; while our eyes doe waite 

For an Ascendent throughly Auspicate : lo 

Under which signe we may the former stone 

Lay of our safeties new foundation : 

That done ; O Cesar, live, and be to us, 

Our Fate, our Fortune, and our Genius ; 

To whose free knees we may our temples tye iS 

As to a still protecting Deitie. 

That sho'd you stirre, we and our Altars too 

May {Great Augustus) goe along with You. 

Chor. Long live the King ; and to accomplish this, 

We'l from our owne, adde far more years to his. ac 



2 94 Hesperides. 



Ultimus Heroum : 

OR, 

To the most learned, and to the right Honourable^ 

Henry, Marquesse o^ Dorchester. 

And as time past when Cato the Severe 

Entred the cirdumspacious Theater ; 

In reverence of his person, every one 

Stood as he had been turn'd from ilesh to stone : 

E'ne so my numbers will astonisht be 

If but lookt on ; struck dead, if scan'd by Thee. 

To his Muse, another to the same. 

Tell that Brave Man, fain thou wo'dst have access 
To kiss his hands, but that for fearfullness ; 
Or else because th' art like a modest Bride, 
Ready to blush to death, sho'd he but chide. 

Upon Vineger. 

Vineger is no other I define. 

Then the dead Corpsy or carkase of the Wine. 

To his learned friend M. Jo. Harmar, Phisitian 

to the Colledge o/* Westminster. 

When first I find those Numbers thou do'st write ; 
To be most soft, terce, sweet, and perpolite : 
Next, when I see Thee towring in the skie, 
In an expansion no less large, then high ; 
Then, in that compass, sayling here and there, 
And with Circumgyration every where ; 
Following with love and active heate thy game, 
And then at last to truss the Epigram ; 
I must confess, distinction none I see 
Between Domitians Martiall then, and Thee. 
But this I know, shovXA Jupiter agen 
Descend from heaven, to re-converse with men ; 
The Romane Language full, and superfine, 
lijove wo'd speake, he wo'd accept of thine. 



Hesperides. 2 9 5 

Upon Ms Spaniell Tracie. 

Now thou art dead, no eye shall ever see, 
For shape and service, Spaniell like to thee. 
This shall my love doe, give thy sad death one 
Teare, that deserves of me a million. 

The deluge.. 

Drowning, drowning, I espie 

Coming from my Juliets eye : 

'Tis some solace in our smart, 

To have friends to beare a part : 

I have none ; but must be sure 5 

Th' inundation to endure. 

Shall not times hereafter tell 

This for no meane miraclt ; 

When the waters by their fall 

Threatn'd ruine unto all ? lo 

Yet the deluge here was known, 

Of a world to drowne but One. 

Raggs. 

What are our patches, tatters, raggs, and rents, 
But the base dregs and lees of vestiments ? 

Strength to support Soveraignty. 

Let Kings and Rulers, learne this line from me ; 
Where power is weake, unsafe is Majestie. 



Crutches. 

Thou seest me Lucia this year droope. 

Three Zodiaks fill'd more I shall stoope ; 

Let Crutches then provided be 

To shore up my debilitie. 

Then while thou laugh'st ; He, sighing, crie, 

A Ruine underpropi am I : 



296 Hesperides. 

Do'n will I then my Beadsmans gown, 

And when so feeble I am grown, 

As my weake shoulders cannot beare 

The burden of a Grashopper : 10 

Yet with the bench of aged sires. 

When I and they keep tearmly fires ; 

With my weake voice He sing, or say 

Some Odes I made of Lucia : 

Then will I heave my wither'd hand 15 

To Jove the Mighty for to stand 

Thy faithfuU friend, and to poure downe 

Upon thee many a Benizon. 



To Julia. 

Holy waters hither bring 

For the sacred sprinkling : 

Baptize me and thee, and so 

Let us to the Altar go. 

And (ere we our rites commence) 

Wash our hands in innocence. 

Then I'le be the Rex Sacrorum, 

Thou the Queen of Peace and Quorum. 



To Perenna. 

I a Dirge will pen for thee ; 
Thou a Trentall make for me : 
That the Monks and Fryers together, 
Here may sing the rest of either : 
Next, I'm sure, the Nuns will have 
Candlemas to grace the Grave. 



To his Sister in Law, M. Susanna Herrick. 

The Person crowns the Place ; your lot doth fall 
Last, yet to be with These a Principall. 
How ere it fortuned ; know for Truth, I meant 
You a fore-leader in this Testament. 



Hesperides. 297 

Upon the Lady Crew. 

This Stone can tell the storie of my life, 

What was my Birth, to whom I was a Wife : 

In teeming years, how soon my Sun was set, 

Where now I rest, these may be known hy jet. 

For other things, my many Children be 5 

The best and truest Chronicles of me. 



On Tomasin Parsons. 

Grow up in Beauty, as thou do'st begin, 
And be of all admired, Tomasin. 

Ceremony upon Candlemas Eve. 

Down with the Rosemary, and so 
Down with the Baies, & misletoe : 
Down with the Holly, Ivie, all, 
Wherewith ye drest the Christmas Hall : 
That so the superstitious find 
No one least Branch there left behind : 
For look how many leaves there be 
Neglected there (maids trust to me) 
So many Goblins you shall see. 

Suspicion makes secure. 

He that will live of all cares dispossest. 
Must shun the bad, I, and suspect the best. 

To his kinsman M. Tho: Herrick, who 
desired to be in his Book. 

Welcome to this my Colledge, and though late 
Tha'st got a place here (standing candidate) 
It matters not, since thou art chosen one 
Here of my great and good foundation. 

Ceremony ui)on Candlemas Eve. 6 superstitions] Misprinted superstions 



298 



Hesperides. 



A Bucolick betwixt 'Two : Lacon and Thyrsis. 

Lacon. For a kiss or two, confesse, 

What doth cause this pensiveness ? 

Thou most lovely Neat-heardesse : 

Why so lonely on the hill ? 

Why thy pipe by thee so still, 5 

That ere while was heard so shrill ? 

Tell me, do thy kine now fail 

To fulfill the milkin-paile ? 

Say, what is't that thou do'st aile ? 

Thyr. None of these ; but out, alas ! 10 

A mischance is come to pass. 
And I'le tell thee what it was : 
See mine eyes are weeping ripe. 
Lacon Tell, and I'le lay down my Pipe.. 

Thyr. I have lost my lovely steere, 15 

That to me was far more deer 
Then these kine, which I milke here. 
Broad of fore-head, large of eye, 
Party colour'd like a Pie ; 

Smooth in each limb as a die ; ao 

Clear of hoof, and clear of horn ; 
Sharply pointed as a thorn : 
With a neck by yoke unworn. 
From the which hung down by strings, 
Balls of Cowslips, Daisie rings, 25 

Enterplac't with ribbanings. 
Faultless every way for shape ; 
Not a straw co'd him escape ; 
Ever gamesome as an ape : 

But yet harmless as a sheep. 30 

(Pardon, Lacon if I weep) 
Tears will spring, where woes are deep. 
Now (ai me) (ai me.) Last night 
Came a mad dog, and did bite, 
I, and kil'd my dear delight. 35 



Hesperides^ 2 9 9 

Lacon. Alack for grief ! 
Thyr. But I'le be brief, 

Hence I must, for time doth call 
Me, and my sad Play-mates all, 
To his Ev'ning Funerall. 40 

Live long, Lacon, so adew. 
Lacon. Mournfull maid farewell to you ; 
Earth afford ye flowers to strew. 



Upon Sapho. 



Look upon Sapho's lip, and you will swear 
There is a love-like-leven rising there. 



Upon Faunus. 

We read how Faunus, he the shepheards God, 
His wife to death whipt with a Mirtk Rod. 
The Rod (perhaps) was better'd by the name ; 
But had it been of Birch, the death's the same. 



A Bachanalian Verse. 

Drinke up 

Your Cup, 
But not spill Wine ; 

For if you 

Do, 5 

'Tis an ill signe ; 

That we 

Foresee, 
You are cloy'd here, 

If so, no 10 

Hoe, 
But avoid here. 



3 o o Hesperides. 



Care a good keeper. 

Care keepes the Co7iquest ; 'tis no lesse renowne. 
To keepe a Citie, then to winne a Towne. 



Rules for our reach. 

Men must have Bounds how farre to walke ; for we 
Are made farre worse, by lawless liberty. 



"To Biancha. 

Ah Biancha ! now I see, 
It is Noone and past with me 
In a while it will strike one ; 
Then Biancha, I am gone. 
Some effusions let me have, 
Offer'd on my holy Grave ; 
Then, Biancha, let me rest 
With my face towards the East. 



To the handsome Mistresse Grace Potter. 

As is your name, so is your comely face, 
Toucht every where with such diffused grace. 
As that in all that admirable round. 
There is not one least solecisme found ; 
And as that part, so every portion else, 
Keepes line for line with Beauties Parallels, 



Hesperides. 301 

Anacreontike. 

I must 

Not trust 
Here to any ; 

Bereav'd, 

Deceiv'd 5 

By so many : 

As one 

Undone 
By my losses ; 

Comply 10 

Willi 
With my crosses. 

Yet still 

I will 
Not be grieving ; rs 

Since thence 

And hence 
Comes relieving. 

But this 

Sweet is ao 

In our mourning ; 

Times bad 

And sad 
Are a turning : 

And he 25 

Whom we 
See dejected ; 

Next day 

Wee may 
See erected. 30 



More modesty more manly. 

'Tis still observ'd, those men most valiant are, 
That are, most modest ere they come to warre. 

Not to covet much where little is the charge. 

Why sho'd we covet much, when as we know, 
Wave more to beare our charge, then way to go ? 



302 Hesperides. 

Anacr{e)ontick Verse. 

Brisk methinks I am, and fine. 
When I drinke my capring wine : 
Then to love I do encline ; 
When I drinke my wanton wine : 
And I wish all maidens mine, 
When I drinke my sprightly wine ; 
Well I sup, and well I dine. 
When I drinke my frolick wine : 
But I languish, lowre, and Pine, 
When I want my fragrant wine. 



Patience in Princes. 

Kings must not use the Axe for each offence : 
Princes cure some faults by their patience. 

Feare gets. force. 

Despaire takes heart, when ther's no hope to speed: 
The Coward then takes Armes, and dds the deed. 



Parcell-gir.t-Paetry. 

Let's strive to be the best ; the Gods, we know it, 
Pillars and men, hate an indifferent Poet. 

Upon Love^ by way of question and answer. 

I bring ye Love, Quest. What will love do ? 

Ans. Like, and dislike ye : 
I bring ye love : Quest. What will Love do ? 

Ans. Stroake ye to strike ye. 
I bring7e love : Quest. What will Love do ? 

Ans. Love will be-foole ye : 
I briiig ye love : Quest. What will love do ? 

Ans. Heate ye to coole ye : 
I bring ye love : Qitest. What will love do ? 

Ans. Love gifts will send ye : 



Hesperides. 303 

I bring ye love : Quest. What will love do ? 

Ans. Stock ye to spend ye : 
I bring ye love : Quest. What will love do ? 

Ans. Love will fulfill ye : 
I bring ye love : Quest. What will love do? 15 

Ans. Kisse ye, to kill ye. 

To the Lord Hopton, on his fight in Cornwall. 

Go on brave Hopton, to effectuate that 
Which wee, and times to come, shall wonder at. 
Lift up thy Sword ; next, suffer it to fall, 
And by that One blow set an end to all. 

His Grange. 

How well contented in this private Grange 
Spend I my life (that's subject unto change :) 
Under whose Soofe with Mosse-worke wrought, there I 
Kisse my Brown ivife, and black Posterity. 

Leprosie in houses. 

When to a House I come, and see 

The Genius wastefull, more then free : 

The servants thumbksse, yet to eat, 

With lawlesse tooth the floure of wheate : 

The Sonnes to suck the milke of Kine, 5 

More then the teats of Discipline : 

The Daughters wild and loose in dresse ; 

Their cheekes unstain'd with shamefac'tnesse : 

The Husband drunke, the Wife to be 

A Baud to incivility : 10 

I must cohfesse, I there descrie, 

A House spred through with Leprosie. 

Good manners at meat. 

This rule of manners I will teach my guests, 
To come with their own bellies unto feasts : 
Not to eat equdll portions ; but to rise 
Farc't with the food, that may themselves suffice. 



3 04 Hesperides. 



Anthea's Retractation. 

Anthea laught, and fearing lest excesse 
Might stretch the cords of civill comelinesse : 
She with a dainty blush rebuk't her face ; 
And cal'd each line back to his rule and space. 



Comforts in Crosses. 

Be not dismaide, though crosses cast thee downe ; 
Thy fall is but the rising to a Crowne. 



Seeke and finde. 

Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt ; 
Nothings so hard, but search will find it out. 



Rest. 

On with thy worke, though thou beast hardly prest ; 
Labour is held up, by the hope of rest. 



Leprosie in Cloathes. 

When flowing garments I behold 

Enspir'd with Purple, Pearle, and Gold; 

I think no other but I see 

In them a glorious leprosie 

That do's infect, and make the rent 

More mortall in the vestiment. 

As flowrie vestures doe descrie 

The wearers rich immodestie ; 

So plaine and simple cloathes doe show 

Where veriue walkes, not those that flow. 



Hesperides. 305 

Great Maladies, long Medicines. 

To an old soare a long cure must goe on ; 
Great faults require great satisfaction. 



His Answer to a friend. 

You aske me what I doe, and how I live ? 
And (Noble friend) this answer I must give : 
Drooping, I draw on to the vaults of death, 
Or'e which you'l walk, when I am laid beneath. 

The Begger. 

Shall I a daily Begger be, 

For loves sake asking almes of thee ? 

Still shall I crave, and never get 

A hope of my desired bit ? 

Ah cruell maides ! He goe my way. 

Whereas (perchance) my fortunes may 

Finde out a Threshold or a doore, 

That may far sooner speed the poore : 

Where thrice we knock, and none will heare, 

Cold comfort still I'm sure lives there. 



Bastards. 

Our Bastard-children are but like to Plate, 
Made by the Coyners illegitimate. 

His change. 

My many cares and much distress, 
Has made me like a wilderness : 
Or (discompos'd) I'm like a rude, 
And all confused multitude : 
Out of my comely manners worne ; 
And as in meanes, in minde all tome. 



3 o 6 Hesperides. 



The Vision. 

Me thought I saw (as I did dreame in bed) 
A crawling Vine about Anacreons head : 
Flusht was his face ; his haires with oyle did shine ; 
And as he spake, his mouth ranne ore with wine. 
Tipled he was ; and tipling lispt withall ; 
And hsping reeld, and reeling like to fall. 
A young Mmhanfresse close by him did stand 
Tapping his plump thighes with a mirtle wand : 
She smil'd ; he kist ; and kissing, cull'd her too ; 
And being cup-shot, more he co'd not doe. 
For which (me thought) in prittie anger she 
Snatcht off his Crown, and gave the wreath to me : 
Since when (me thinks) my braines about doe swim, 
And I am wilde and wanton like to him. 



A vow to Venus. 

Happily I had a sight 
Of my dearest deare last night ; 
Make her this day smile on me. 
And He Roses give to thee. 



On his Booke. 

The bound (almost) now of my book I see 
But yet no end of those therein or me : 
Here we begin new life ; while thousands quite 
Are lost, and theirs,, in everlasting night. 

A sonnet of Perilla. 

Then did I live when I did see 
Perilla smile on none but me. 
But (ah !) by starres malignant crost^ 
The life I got I quickly lost : 
But yet a way there doth remaine, 
For me embalm'd to live againe ; 
And that's to love me j in which state 
He live as one Regenerate. 



tiesperides. 3 *^ 7 

Bad may be better. 

Man may at first transgress, but next do well : 
Vice doth in some but lodge a while, not dwell. 

Posting to Printing. 

Let others to the Printing Presse run fast. 
Since after death comes glory, He not haste. 

Rapine brings Ruine. 

What's got by Justice is establisht sure ; 
No Kingdomes got by Rapine long endure. 

Comfort to a youth that had hst his Love, 

What needs complaints, 
When she a place 
Has with the race 

Of Saints ? 
In endlesse mirth, 5 

She thinks not on 
What's said or done 

In earth : 
She sees no teares, 

Or any tone 30 

Of thy deep grone 

She heares : 
Nor do's she minde, 
Or think on't now, 
That ever thou 15 

Wast kind. 
But chang'd above. 
She likes not there. 
As she did here. 

Thy Love. 20 

Forbeare therefore, 
And Lull asleepe 
Thy woes and weep 

No more. 



3 o 8 Hesperides. 

Saint Distaffs day, or the morrow after 
Twelfth day. 

Partly worke and partly play 

Ye must on S. Distaffs day : 

From the Plough soone free your teame ; 

Then come home and fother them. 

If the Maides a spinning goe, 

Burne the flax, and fire the tow : 

Scorch their plackets, but beware 

That ye singe no maiden-haire. 

Bring in pailes of water then, 

Let the Maides bewash the men. 

Give S. Distaffe all the right. 

Then bid Christmas sport good-night ; 

And next morrow, every one 

To his owne vocation. 



Sufferance. 

In the hope of ease to come, 
Let's endure one Martyrdome. 



His teares to Thamasis. 

I send, I send here my supremest kiss 

To thee my silverfooted Thamasis. 

No more shall I reiterate thy Strand, 

Whereon so many Stately Structures stand : 

Nor in the summers sweeter evenings go. 

To bath in thee (as thousand others doe.) 

No more shall I a long thy christall glide, 

In Barge (with boughes and rushes beautifi'd) 

With soft-smooth Virgins (for our chast disport) 

To Richmond, Kingstone, and to Hampton-Court: 

Never againe shall I with Finnie-Ore 

Put from, or draw unto the faithfull shore : 

And Landing here, or safely Landing there, 

Make way to my Beloved Westminster : 



Hesperides. 309 

Or to the Golden-cheap-side, where the earth 15 

Oi Julia Herrick gave to me my Birth. 

May all clean Nimphs and curious water Dames, 

With Swan-like-state, flote up & down thy streams : 

No drought upon thy wanton waters fall 

To make them Leane, and languishing at all. 20 

No ruffling winds come hither to discease 

Thy pure, and Silver-wristed Naides. 

Keep up your state ye streams ; and as ye spring, 

Never make sick your Banks by surfeiting. 

Grow young with Tydes, and though I see ye never, 25 

Receive this vow, so fare-ye-well for ever. 



Pardons. 

Those ends in War the best contentment bring. 
Whose Peace is made up with a Pardoning. 



Peace not Permanent. 

Great Cities seldome rest : If there be none 

T' invade from far : Theflfinde worse foes at home. 



Truth and Errour. 

Twixt Truth and Errour, there^s this difference known, 
Errour isfruitfull. Truth is onely one. 



Things mortall still mutable. 

Things are uncertain, and the more we get. 
The more on ycie pavements we are set. 

Studies to he supported. 

Studies themselves will languish and decay. 
When either price, or praise is ta'ne away. 



310 Hesperides. 



Wit punisht^ prospers most. 

Dread not the shackles : on With thine intent ; 
Good wits get more fame by their punishment. 



'Twelfe night, or King and Queene. 

Now, now the mirth comes 

With the cake full of plums, 
Where Beane's the Xing of the sport here ; 

Beside we must know, 

The Pea also 6 

Must revell, as Queene, in the Court here. 

Begin then to chuse, 

(This night as ye use) 
Who shall for the present delight here, 

Be a King by the lot, jo 

And who shall not 
Be Twelfe-day Queene for the night here. 

Which knowne, let us make 

Joy-sops with the cake ; 
And let not a man then be seen here, 15 

Who unurg'd will not drinke 

To the base from the brink 
A health to the King and the Queene here. 

Next crowne the bowle full 

With gentle lambs-wooll ; 20 

Adde sugar, nutmeg and ginger. 

With store of ale too ; 

And thus ye must doe 
To make the waesaile a swinger. 

Give then to the King 25 

And Queene wassailing ; 
And though with ale ye be whet here •, 

Yet part ye from hence, 

As free from offence, 
As when ye innocent met here. 30 



Hesperides. 311 



His desire. 

Give me a man that is not dull, 
When all the world with rifts is full : 
But unamaz'd dares clearely sing, 
When as the roof's a tottering : 
And, though it falls, continues still 
Tickling the Citterne with his quilL 



Caution in Councell. 

Know when to speake ; for many times it brings 
Danger to give the best advice to Kings. 



Moderation. 

Let moderation on thy passions waite 

Who loves too much, too much the lov'd will hate. 



Advice the best actor. 

Still take advice ; though counsels when they fly e 
At randome, sometimes hit most happily. 



Conformity is Comely. 

Conformity gives comelinesse to things. 
And eguctll shares exclude all murmerings. 



Lawes. 

Who violates the Customes, hurts the Health, 
Not of one man, but all the Common-wealth. 



The meane. 

Tis much among the filthy to be dean ; 
Our heat of youth mn hardly keep the mean. 



312 Hesperides. 

Like loves his like. 

Like will to like, each Creature loves his kinde ; 
Chaste words proceed still from a bashfull minde. 

His hope or sheat- Anchor. 

Among these Tempests great and manifold 
My Ship has here one only Anchor-hold ; 
That is my hope ; which if that slip, I'm one 
Wildred in this vast watry Region. 

Comfort in Calamity. 

Tis no discomfort in the world to fall, 

When the great Crack not Crushes one, but all. 

Twilight. 

The Twi-light is no other thing (we say) 

Then Night now gone, and yet not sprung the Day. 

False Mourning. 

He who wears Blacks, and mournes not for the Dead, 
Do's but deride the Party buried. 

The will makes the work, or consent 
makes the Cure. 

No grief is grown so desperate, but the ill 
Is halfe way cured, if the party will. 

Diet. 

If wholsome Diet can re-cure a man. 
What need of Physick, or Physitian ? 

Smart. 

Stripes justly given yerk us (with their fall) 
But causelesse whipping smarts the most of all. 



Hesperides, 313 

The Tinker's Song. 

Along, come along, 
Let's meet in a throng 

Here of Tinkers ; 
And quafife up a Bowie 
As big as a Cowle 5 

To Beer Drinkers. 
The Pole of the Hop 
Place in the Ale-shop 

to Bethwack us ; 
If ever we think lo 

So much as to drink 

Unto Bacchus. 
Who frolick will be. 
For little cost he 

Must not vary, 15 

From Beer-broth at all, 
So much as to call 

For Canary. 

His Comfort. 

The only comfort of my life 

Is, that I never yet had wife ; 

Nor will hereafter ; since I know 

Who Weds, ore-buyes his weal with woe. 

Sincerity. 

Wash clean the Vessell, lest ye soure 
What ever Liquor in ye powre. 

To Anthea. 

Sick is Anthea, sickly is the spring. 

The Primrose sick, and sickly every thing : 

The while my deer Anthea do's but droop. 

The Tulips, Lillies, Daffadills do stoop ; 

But when again sh'as got her healthfull houre, 5 

Each bending then, will rise a proper flower. ■ 



314 Hesperides. 

Nor buying or selling. 

Now, if you love me, tell me. 
For as I will not sell ye, 
So not one cross to buy thee 
He give, if thou deny me. 

To his peculiar friend M. Jo: Wicks. 

Since shed or Cottage I have none, 

I sing the more, that thou hast one ; 

To whose glad threshold, and free door 

I may a Poet come, though poor j 

And eat with thee a savory bit, S 

Paying but common thanks for it. 

Yet sho'd I chance, (my Wicks) to see 

An over-leven-looks in thee, 

To soure the Bread, and turn the Beer 

To an exalted vineger ; 10 

Or sho'dst thou prize me as a Dish 

Of thrice-boyl d-worts, or third dayes fish ; 

I'de rather hungry go and come. 

Then to thy house be Burdensome ; 

Yet, in my depth of grief, I'de be 15 

One that sho'd drop his Beads for thee. 

The more mighty, the more mercifull. 

Who may do most, do's least: The bravest will 
Shew mercy there, where they have power to kill. 

After Autumne, Winter. 

Die ere long I'm sure, I shall ; 
After leaves, the tree must fall. 



A good death, 

nay this sentenc 
ill, that liveth u 

Tohisftcnliarfrimd. Blocks] Perhaps we should read \ooke. 



For truth I may this sentence tell, 
No ihan dies ill, that liveth well. 



Hesperides, 315 



Recompence. 

Who plants an Olive, but to eate the Oile? 
Reward, we know, is the chief e end of toile. 

On Fortune. 

This is my comfort, when she's most unkind, 
She can but spoile me of my Meanes, not Mind. 

To Sir George Parrie, Doctor of the 

Civil/ Law. 

I have my Laurel Chaplet on my head. 

If 'mongst these many Numbers to be read, 

But one by you be hug'd and cherished. 

Peruse my Measures thoroughly, and where 
Your judgement finds a guilty Poem, there 
Be you a Judge ; but not a Judge severe. 

The meane passe by, or over, none contemne ; 
The good applaud : the peccant lesse condemne, 
Since Absolution you can give to them. 

Stand forth Brave Man, here to the publique sight ; 
And in my Booke now claim a two-fold right : 
The first as Doctor, and the last as Knight. 

Charmes. 

This He tell ye by the way, 
Maidens when ye Leavens lay, 
Crosse your Dow, and your dispatch. 
Will be better for your Batch. 

Another. 

In the morning when ye rise 

Wash your hands, and cleanse your eyes. 

Next be sure ye have a care, 

To disperse the water farre. 

For as farre as that doth light, 

So farre keepes the evill Spright. 



3 1 6 Hesperides. 



Another, 

If ye feare to be affrighted 

When ye are (by chance) benighted : 

In your Pocket for a trust, 

Carrie nothing but a Crust : 

For that holy piece of Bread, 5 

Charmes the danger, and the dread. 

Gentlenesse. 

That Prince must govern with a gentle hand, 
Who will have love comply with his command. 

A Dialogue betwixt himself e and Mistresse Eliza: 
Wheeler, under the name of Amarillis. 

My dearest Love, since thou wilt go, 

And leave me here behind thee ; 
For love or pitie let me know 

The place where I may find thee. 
Amaril. In country Meadowes pearl'd with Dew, 5 

And set about with Lillies ; 
There filling Maunds with Cowslips, you 

May find your Amarillis. 

Her. What have the Meades to do with thee, 

Or with thy youthful! houres ? 10 

Live thou at Court, where thou mayst be 
The Queen of men, not flowers. 

Let Country wenches make 'em fine 

With Poesies, since 'tis fitter 
For thee with richest Jemmes to shine, 15 

And like the Starres to glitter. 

Amaril. You set too high a rate upon 

A Shepheardess so homely ; 
Her. Believe it (dearest) ther's not one 

I'th' Court that's halfe so comly. ao 

I prithee stay. {Am.) I must away, 

Lets kiss first, then we'l sever. 
Ambo. And though we bid adieu to day. 

Wee shall not part for ever. 



HesperiJes. 317 



To Julia. 

Help me, Julia, for to pray, 
Mattens sing, or Mattens say : 
This I know, the Fiend will fly 
Far away, if thou beest by. 
Bring the Holy-water hither ; 
Let us wash, and pray together : 
When our Beads are thus united. 
Then the Foe will fly affrighted. 

To Roses in Julia's Bosome. 

Roses, you can never die, 
Since the place wherein ye lye, 
Heat and moisture mixt are so. 
As to make ye ever grow. 

To the Honoured, Master 

Endimion Porter. 

When to thy Porch I come, and (ravisht) see 
The State of Poets there attending Thee : 
Those Bardes, and I, all in a Chorus sing. 
We are Thy Prophets Forter ; Thou our King. 

Speake in season. 

When times are troubled, then forbeare ; but speak, 
When a cleare day, out of a Cloud do's break. 

Obedience. 

The Power of Princes rests in the Consent 
Of onely those, who are obedient : 
Which if away, proud Scepters then will lye 
Low, and of Thrones the Ancient Majesty. 

Another on the same. 

No man so well a Kingdome Rules, as He, 
Who hath himselfe obaid the Soveraignty. 



3 1 8 Hesperides. 

Of Love. 

1. Instruct me now, what love will do; 

2. 'Twill make a tongless man to wooe. 

1. Inform me next, what love will do ; 

2. 'Twill strangely make a one of too. 

1. Teach me besides, what love wil do ; 

2. 'Twill quickly mar, & make ye too. 

1. Tell me, now last, what love will do; 

2. 'Twill hurt and heal a heart pierc'd through. 



The School or Perl of Putney, the Mistress of all 
singular manners, Mistresse Portman. 

Whether I was my selfe, or else did see 

Out of my self that Glorious Hierarchie ! 

Or whether those (in orders rare) or these 

Made up One State of Sixtie Venuses ; 

Or whether Fairies^ Syrens, I^ymjihes they were, 5 

Or Muses, on their mouhtaine sitting there ; 

Or some enchanted Place, I do not know 

(Or Sharon, where eternall Roses grow.) 

This I am sure ; I Ravisht stood, as one 

Confus'd in utter Admiration. lo 

Me thought I saw them stir, and gently move, 

And look as all were capable of Love : 

And in their motion smelt much like to flowers 

Enspir'd by th' Sun-beams after dews & showers. 

There did I see the Reverend Rectresse stand, 15 

Who with her eyes-gleam, or a glance of hand, 

Those spirits rais'd ; and with like precepts then 

SAs with a Magic/^ laid them all agen : 
A happy Realme I When no compulsive Law, 
Or fear of it, but Love keeps all in awe.) 20 

Live you, great Mistresse of your Arts, and be 
A nursing Mother so to Majesty ; 

The School. 19 compulsive] Some copies 0/1648 misprint compnlsine and 
compulsinve 22 K\ Misprinted A. a. 



Hesperides. 3^9 

As those your Ladies may in time be seene, 

For Grace and Carriage, every one a Queene. 

One Birth their Parents gave them ; but their new, 25 

And better Being, they receive from You. 

Mans former Birth is grace-lesse ; but the state 

Of life comes in, when he's Regenerate. 



To Perenna. 

Thou say'st I'm dull ; if edge-lesse so I be, 
He whet my lips, and sharpen Love on thee. 



On himselfe. 

Let me not live, if I not love, 
Since I as yet did never prove. 
Where Pleasures met : at last, doe find, 
All Pleasures meet in Woman-kind. 



On Love. 

That love 'twixt men do's ever longest last 
Where War and Peace the Dice by turns doe cast. 



Another on Love. 

Love's of it self, too sweet ; the best of all 
Is, when loves hony has a dash of gall. 



Pleasures Pernicious. 

Where Pleasures rule a Kingdome, never there 
Is sober virtue, seen to move her sphere. 



320 Mesperides. 



On himself. 

A wearied Pilgrim, I have wandred here 
Twice five and twenty (bate me but one yeer) 
Long I have lasted in this world ; (tis true) 
But yet those yeers that I have liv'd, but few. 
Who by his gray Haires, doth his lusters tell, 
Lives not those yeers, but he that lives them well. 
One man has reatch't his sixty yeers, but he 
Of all those three-score, has not liv'd halfe three : 
He lives, who lives to virtue : men who cast 
Their ends for Pleasure, do not live, but last. 

To M. Laurence Swetnaham. 

Read thou my Lines, my Swetnaham, if there be 
A fault, tis hid, if it be voic't by thee. 
Thy mouth will make the sourest numbers please ; 
How will it drop pure hony, speaking these ? 

His Covenant or Protestation to Julia. 

Why do'st thou wound, & break my heart ? 

As if we sho'd for ever part ? 

Hast thou not heard an Oath from me. 

After a day, or two, or three, 

I wo'd come back and live with thee ? 

Take, if thou do'st distrust, that Vowe ; 

This second Protestation now. 

Upon thy cheeke that spangel'd Teare, 

Which sits as Dew of Roses there : 

That Teare shall scarce be dri'd before 

lie kisse the Threshold of thy dore. 

Then weepe not sweet ; but thus much know, 

I'm halfe return'd before I go. 

On himselfe. 

I will no longer kiss, 
I can no longer stay ; 
The way of all Flesh is, 
That I must go this day : 

His Covenant. 6. distrust,] The comma should perhap be deleted 



Hesperides. 321 



Since longer I can't live, 
My frolick Youths adieu ; 
My Lamp to you He give, 
And all my troubles too. 

To the most accomplisht Gentleman Master 
Michael Oulsworth. 

Nor thinke that Thou in this my Booke art worst, 
Because not plac't here with the midst, or first. 
Since Fame that sides with these, or goes before 
Those, that must live with Thee for evermore. 
That Fame, and Fames rear'd Pillar, thou shalt see 
In the next sheet Brave Man to follow Thee. 
Fix on That Columne then, and never fall ; 
Held up by Fames eternall Pedestall. 

To his Girles who would have him sportfull. 

Alas I can't, for tell me how 
Can I be gamesome (a,ged now) 
Besides ye see me daily grow 
Here Winter-like, to Frost and Snow. 
And I ere long, my Girles shall see, 
Ye quake for cold to looke on me. 

Truth and Falsehood. 

Truth by her mvn simplicity is known, 
Falsehood by Varnish and Vermillion. 

His last request to Julia. 

I have been wanton, and too bold I feare, 
To chafe o're much the Virgins cheek or eare : 
Beg for my YsxAan. Julia ; He doth winne 
Grace with the Gods, whds sorry for his sinne. 
That done, ray Julia, deaxest Julia, come, 
And go with me to chuse my Buriall roome : 
My Fates are ended ; when thy Herrick dyes, 
Claspe thou his Book, then close thou up his Eyes 



32 2 Hesperides. 



On himselfe. 

One Eare tingles • some there be, 
That are snarling now at me : 
Be they those that Homer bit, 
I will give them thanks for it. 



Upon Kings. 

Kings must be dauntlesse : Subjects will contemne 
Those, who want Hearts, and weare a Diadem. 



"To his Girles. 

Wanton Wenches doe not bring 
For my haires black colouring : 
For my Locks (Girles) let 'em be 
Gray or white, all's one to me. 

Upon Spur. 

Spur jingles now, and sweares by no meane oathes. 
He's double honour'd, since h'as got gay cloathes : 
Most like his Suite, and all commend the Trim ; 
And thus they praise the Sumpter ; but not him : 
As to the Goddesse, people did conferre 
Worship, and not to'th' Asse that carried her. 



To his Brother Nicolas Herrlck. 

What others have with cheapnesse scene, and ease. 
In Varnisht maps ; by'th' helpe of Compasses ; 
Or reade in Volumes, and those Bookes (with all 
Their large Narrations, Incanonicalt) 
Thou hast beheld those seas, and Countries farre ; 
And tel'st to us, what once they were, and are. 
So that with bold truth, thou canst now relate 
This Kingdomes fortune, and that Empires fate : 
Canst talke to us of Sharon ; where a spring 
Of Roses have an endlesse flourishing. 



Hesperides. ^2^ 

Of Swn, Sinai, Nebo, and with them, 

Make knowne to us the r^oy^ Jerusalem. 

The Mount of Olives ; Calverie, and where 

Is (and hast seene) thy Saviours Sej>ulcher. 

So that the man that will but lay his eares, 15 

As Inapostate, to the thing he heares, 

Shall by his hearing quickly come 10 see 

The truth of Travails lesse in bookes then Thee. 



The Voice and Violl. 

Rare is the voice it selfe ; but when we sing 
To'th Lute or Violl, then 'tis ravishing. 



Warre. 

If Kings and kingdomes, once distracted be, 
The sword of war must trie the Soveraignty. 



A King and no King. 

That Prince, who may doe nothing but whafsjust, 
Rules but by leave, and takes his Crowne on trust. 

Phts not still prosperous. 

All are not ill Plots, that doe sometimes faile ; 
Nor those false vows, which oft times don't prevaile 



Flatterie. 

What is't that wasts a Prince ? example showes, 
'Tis flatterie spends a King, more then his foes. 

Excesse. 

Excesse is sluttish : keepe the meane ; for why ? 
Vertue's clean Conclave is sobriety. 

1 7 byj be 1648 {an obvious misprint) 



324 Hesperides. 



The soul is the salt. 

The body's salt, the soule is ; which when gon 
The ilesh soone sucks in putrifaction. 



Foolishnesse. 

Id's Tiisc'lanes, Tullie doth confesse, 
No plague ther's like to foolishnesse. 



Abstinence. 

Against diseases here the strongest fence 
Is the defensive vertue, Abstinence. 



iVo danger to men desperate. 

When feare admits no hope of safety, then 
Necessity makes dastards valiant men. 



Sauce for sorrowes. 

Although our suffering meet with no reliefe. 
An equall mind is the best sauce for griefe. 



To Cupid. 

I have a leaden, thou a shaft of gold ; 

Thou kil'st with heate, and I strike dead with cold 

Let's trie of us who shall the first expire ; 

Or thou by frost, or I by quenchlesse fire : 

Extreames are fatall, where they once doe strike, 1 

And bring t'tK heart destruction both alike. 

Poolishnesse. 1 Tusc'lanes] Misprinted Tiisc'luanes in some copies ofz64S 
To Cupid. 4 by] Misprinted be 



Hesperides. 325 



Distrust. 

What ever men for Loyalty pretend, 

'lis Wisdomes pari to doubt a faithfull friend. 

The mount of the Muses. 

After thy labour take thine ease, 
Here with the sweet Pierides. 
But if so be that men will not 
Give thee the Laurell Crowne for lot ; 
Be yet assur'd, thou shalt have one 
Not subject to corruption. 

On Himselfe. 

Il'e write no more of Love ; but now repent 
Of all those times that I in it have spent. 
He write no more of life ; but wish twas ended. 
And that my dust was to the earth commended. 

To his Booke. 

Goe thou forth my booke, though late ; 

Yet be timely fortunate. 

It may chance good-luck may send 

Thee a kinsman, or a friend, 

That may harbour thee, when I, 

With my fates neglected lye. 

If thou know'st not where to dwell, 

See, the fier's by : Farewell. 

The end of his worke. 

Part of the worke remaines ; one part is past : 
And here my ship rides having Anchor cast. 

To Crowne it. 

My wearied Barke, O Let it now be Crown'd ! 
The Haven reacht to which I first was bound. 



326 Hesperides. 

On Himself e. 

The worke is done : young men, and maidens set 

Upon my curies the Mirth Coronet, 

Washt with sweet ointments ; Thus at last I come 

To suffer in the Muses Martyrdome : 

But with this comfort, if my blood be shed, 

The Muses will weare blackes, when I am dead. 



'The pillar of Fame. 

Fames pillar here, at last, we set, 

Out-during Marble, Brasse, or Jet, 

Charm'd and enchanted so, 

As to withstand the blow 

Of overthrow : 

Nor shall the seas, 

Or Outrages 

Of storms orebear 

What we up-rear, 

Tho Kingdoms fal, 

This pillar never shall 

Decline or waste at all; 

But stand for ever by his owne 

Firme and well fixt foundation. 



To his Book's end this last line he'd have plac't, 
Jocond his Muse was ; but his Life was chast. 

FINIS. 



The pillar of Fame. 10 Tho Kingdoms fal] Misprinted Tho Kingdom fals 
in some copies of 164& 



H I S 

NOBLE NUMBERS: 

R, 
HIS PIOUS PIECES, 

Wherein (amongft other things) 

he fings the Birth of his C h r i s t : 

and lighes for his Saviours fufFe- 
ring on the Crojfe 



H E s I o D. 



mm 



LO N T>0 Di, 

Printed iotjohn Williams, and Francis Eglesfield. 

1 64.7. 



HIS 
Noble Numbers : 

OR, 

His pious Pieces. 

His Confession. 

Look how our foule Dayes do exceed our faire ; 
And as our bad, more then our good Works are : 
Ev'n so those Lines, pen'd by my wanton Wit, 
Treble the number of these good I've writ. 
Things precious are least num'rous : Men are prone 
To do ten Bad, for one Good Action. 

His Prayer for Absolution. 

For Those my unbaptized Rhimes, 
Writ in my wild unhallowed Times ; 
For every sentence, clause and word. 
That's not inlaid with Thee, (my Lord) 
Forgive me God, and blot each Line 
Out of my Book, that is not Thine. 
But if, 'mongst all, thou find'st here one 
Worthy thy Benediction ; 
That One of all the rest, shall be 
The Glory of my Work, and Me. 

To finde God. 

Weigh me the Fire ; or, canst thou find 
A way to measure out the Wind ; 
Distinguish all those Floods that are 
Mixt in that watrie Theater ; 
And tast thou them as saltlesse there. 
As in their Channell first they were. 



330 Noble Numbers. 



Tell me the People that do keep 

Within the Kingdomes of the Deep ; 

Or fetch me back that Cloud againe, 

Beshiver'd into seeds of Raine ; lo 

Tell me the -motes, dust, sands, and speares 

Of Corn, when Summer shakes his eares ; 

Shew me that world of Starres, and whence 

They noiselesse spill their Influence : 

This if thou canst ; then shew me Him 15 

That rides the glorious Cherubim, 

What God is. 

God is above the sphere of our esteem, 
And is the best known, not defining Him. 



Upon God. 

God is not onely said to be 
An JEns, but Supraentitie. 



Mercy and Love. 

God hath two wings, which He doth ever move. 
The one is Mercy, and the next is Love : 
Under the first the Sinners ever trust ; 
And with the last he still directs the Just. 

Gods Anger without Affection. 

God when He's angry here with any one. 

His wrath is free from perturbation ; 

And when we think His looks are sowre and grim, 

The alteration is in us, not Him. 

God not to be comprehended. 

'Tis hard to finde God, but to comprehend 
Him, as He is, is labour without end. 



Noble Numbers, 331 

Gods part. 

Prayers and Praises are those spotlesse two 
Lambs, by the Law, which God requires as due. 

Affliction. 

God n'ere afflicts us more then our desert, 
Though He may seem to over-act His part : 
Sometimes He strikes us more then flesh can beare ; 
But yet still lesse then Grace can suffer here. 

Three fatall Sisters. 

Three fatall Sisters wait upon each sin ; 

First, Fear and Shame without, then Guilt within. 



Biknce. 

Suffer thy legs, but not thy tongue to walk : 
God, the most Wise, is sparing of His talk. 

Mirth. 

True mirth resides not in the smiling skin : 
The sweetest solace is to act no sin. 

Loading and unloading. 

God loads, and unloads, (thus His work begins) 
To load with blessings, and unload from sins. 

Gods Mercy. 

Gods boundlesse mercy is (to sinfuU man) 

Like to the ever-wealthy Ocean : 

Which though it sends forth thousand streams, 'tis ne're 

Known, or els seen to be the emptier : 

And though it takes all in, 'tis yet no more 

Full, and fUd-fuU, then when fuU-fild before. 



332 Noble Numbers. 

Prayers must have Poise. 

God He rejects all Prayers that are sleight, 

And want their Poise : words ought to have their weight. 

To God : an Anthem, sung in the Chappell at 
White-Hall, before the King. 

Verse. My God, I'm wounded by my sin, 

And sore without, and sick within : 
Ver. Char. I come to Thee, in hope to find 

Salve for my body, and my mind. 
Verse. In Gilead though no Balme be found. 

To ease this smart, or cure this wound ; 
Ver. Chor. Yet, Lord, I know there is with Thee 

All saving health, and help for me. 
Verse. Then reach Thou forth that hand of Thine, 

That powres in oyle, as well as wine. 
Ver. Chor. And let it work, for I'le endure 

The utmost smart, so Thou wilt cure. 

Upon God. 

God is all fore-part ; for, we never see 
Any part backward in the Deitie. 

Calling, and correcting. 

God is not onely mercifuU, to call 

Men to repent, but when He strikes withall. 

No escaping the scouring. 

God scourgeth some severely, some He spares ; 
But all in smart have lesse, or greater shares. 

The Rod. 

Gods Rod doth watch while men do sleep ; & then 
The Rod doth sleep, while vigilant are men. 



Noble Numbers. 333 



God has a twofold part. 

God when for sin He makes His Children smart, 
His own He acts not, but anothers part : 
But when by stripes He saves them, then 'tis known, 
He comes to play the part that is His own. 

God is One. 

God, as He is most Holy knowne ; 
So He is said to be most One. 



Persecutions profitable. 

Afflictions they most profitable are 
To the beholder, and the sufferer : 
Bettering them both, but by a double straine. 
The first by patience, and the last by paine. 

To God. 

Do with me, God ! as Thou didst deal with_/<>^«, 

(Who writ that heavenly Revelation) 

Let me (like him) first cracks of thunder heare ; 

Then let the Harps inchantments strike mine eare ; 

Here give me thornes ; there, in thy Kingdome, set 

Upon my head the golden coronet ; 

There give me day ; but here my dreadfull night : 

My sackcloth here ; but there my Stole of white. 

Whips. 

God has his whips here to a twofold end. 
The bad to punish, and the good t'amend. 

Gods Providence. 

If all transgressions here should have their pay, 
What need there then be of a reckning day : 
If God should punish no sin, here, of men, 
His Providence who would not question then ? 



3 34 Noble Numbers. 

temptation. 

Those Saints, which God loves best, 
The Devill tempts not least. 



His Ejaculation to God. 

My God ! looke on me with thine eye 

Of pittie, not of scrutinie ; 

For if thou dost, thou then shalt see 

Nothing but loathsome sores in mee. 

O then ! for mercies sake, behold 

These my irruptions manifold ; 

And heale me with thy looke, or touch : 

But if thou wilt not deigne so much, 

Because Fme odious in thy sight, 

Speak but the word, and cure me quite. 



Gods gifts not soone granted. 

God heares us when we pray, but yet defers 
His gifts, to exercise Petitioners : 
And though a while He makes Requesters stay, 
With Princely hand He'l recompence delay. 



Persecutions purifie. 

God strikes His Church, but 'tis to this intent, 
To make, not marre her, by this punishment : 
So where He gives the bitter Pills, be sure, 
*Tis not to poyson, but to make thee pure. 



Pardon. 

God pardons those, who do through frailty sin ; 
But never those that persevere therein. 



Noble Numbers. 335 

An Ode of the Birth of our Saviour. 

1. In Numbers, and but these few, 
I sing Thy Birth, Oh JESU ! 
Thou prettie Babie, borne here, 
With sup'rabundant scorn here : 

Who for Thy Princely Port here, 5 

Hadst for Thy place 

Of Birth, a base 
Out-stable for thy Court here. 

2. Instead of neat Inclosures 

Of inter-woven Osiers ; lo 

Instead of fragrant Posies 
Of Dafifadills, and Roses ; 
Thy cradle, Kingly Stranger, 

As Gospell tells, 

Was nothing els, 15 

But, here, a homely manger. 

3. But we with Silks, (not Cruells) 
With sundry precious Jewells, 
And Lilly-work will dresse Thee ; 

And as we dispossesse thee 20 

Of clouts, wee'l make a chamber. 

Sweet Babe, for Thee, 

Of Ivorie, 
And plaister'd round with Amber. 

4. The Jewes they did disdaine Thee, 25 
But we will entertaine Thee 

With Glories to await here 
Upon Thy Princely State here, 
And more for love, then pittie. 

From yeere to yeere 30 

Wee'l make Thee, here, 
A Free-born of our Citie. 

Lip-labour. 

In the old Scripture I have often read. 
The calfe without meale n'ere was offered ; 
To figure to us, nothing more then this. 
Without the heart, lip-labour nothing is. 



336 



Noble Numbers. 



'The Heart. 



In Prayer the Lips ne're act the winning part, 
Without the sweet concurrence of the Heart. 



Eare-rings. 

Why wore th' Egyptians Jewells in the Eare ? 
But for to teach us, all the grace is there. 
When we obey, by acting what we heare. 



Sin seen. 

When once the sin has fully acted been, 
Then is the horror of the trespasse seen. 



Upon Time. 

Time was upon 
The wing, to flie away ; 

And I cal'd on 
Him but a while to stay ; 

But he'd be gone, 5 

For ought that I could say. 

He held out then, 
A Writing, as he went ; 

And askt me, when 
False man would be content 10 

To pay agen. 
What God and Nature lent. 

An houre-glasse. 
In which were sands but few. 

As he did passe, 15 

He shew'd, and told me too, 

Mine end near was. 
And so away he flew. 



Noble Numbers. 337 



His Petition. 

If warre, or want shall make me grow so poore, 
As for to beg my bread from doore to doore ; 
Lord ! let me never act that beggars part, 
Who hath thee in his mouth, not in his heart. 
He who asks almes in that so sacred Name, 
Without due reverence, playes the cheaters game. 



To God. 

Thou hast promis'd, Lord, to be 
With me in my miserie ; 
Suffer me to be so bold. 
As to speak, Lord, say and hold. 



His Letanie, to the Holy Spirit. 

1. In the houre of my distresse, 
When temptations me oppresse. 
And when I my sins confesse. 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

2. When I lie within my bed, S 
Sick in heart, and sick in head. 

And with doubts discomforted. 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

3. When the house doth sigh and weep. 

And the world is drown'd in sleep, lo 

Yet mine eyes the watch do keep ; 
Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

4. When the artlesse Doctor sees 
No one hope, but of his Fees, 

And his skill runs on the lees ; i5 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

5. When his Potion and his Pill, 
His, or none, or little skill, 
Meet for nothing, but to kill ; 

Sweet Spirit comfort me '! 20 



338 Noble Numbers. 

6. When the passing-bell doth tola, 
And the Furies in a shole 
Come to fright a parting soule ; 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

7. When the tapers now burne blew, 25 
And the comforters are few, 

And that number more then true ; 
Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

8. When the Priest his last hath praid, 

And I nod to what is said, 30 

'Cause my speech is now decaid ; 
Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

9. When (God knowes) I'm tost about. 
Either with despaire, or doubt ; 

Yet before the glasse be out, 35 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

10. When the Tempter me pursu'th 
With the sins of all my youth, 
And halfe damns me with untruth ; 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 40 

11. When the flames and hellish cries 
Fright mine eares, and fright mine eyes, 
And all terrors me surprize ; 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 

12. When the Judgment is reveal'd, 45 
And that open'd which was seal'd, 

When to Thee I have appeal'd ; 

Sweet Spirit comfort me ! 



Thanksgiving. 

Thanksgiving for a former, doth invite 
God to bestow a second benefit. 



Noble Numbers. 339 



Cock-crow. 

Bell-man of Night, if I about shall go 
For to denie my Master, do thou crow. 
Thou stop'st S. Peter in the midst of sin ; 
Stay me, by crowing, ere I do begin ; 
Better it is, premonish'd, for to shun 
A sin, then fall to weeping when 'tis done. 

All things run well for the Righteous. 

Adverse and prosperous Fortunes both work on 
Here, for the righteous mans salvation : 
Be he oppos'd, or be he not withstood. 
All serve to th' Augmentation of his good. 

Paine ends in Pleasure. 

Afflictions bring us joy in times to come. 
When sins, by stripes, to us grow wearisome. 

To God. 

rie come, I'le creep, (though Thou dost threat) 

Humbly unto Thy Mercy-seat : 

When I am there, this then I'le do, 

Give Thee a Dart, and Dagger too ; 

Next, when I have my faults confest, 

Naked I'le shew a sighing brest ; 

Which if that can't Thy pittie wooe, 

Then let Thy Justice do the rest, 

And strike it through. 

J Thanksgiving to God, for his House. 

Lord, Thou hast given me a cell 

Wherein to dwell, 
A little house, whose humble Roof 

Is weather-proof; 
Under the sparres of which I lie 

Both soft, and drie ; 
Where Thou my chamber for to ward 

Hast set a Guard 



340 Noble Numbers. 



Of harmlesse thoughts, to watch and keep 

Me, while I sleep. ro 

Low is my porch, as is my Fate, 

Both void of state ; 
And yet the threshold of my doore 

Is worn by'th poore, 
Who thither come, and freely get 15 

Good words, or meat : 
Like as my Parlour, so my Hall 

And Kitchin's small : 
A little Butterie, and therein 

A little Byn, 20 

Which keeps my little loafe of Bread 

Unchipt, unflead : 
Some brittle sticks of Thome or Briar 

Make me a fire, 
Close by whose living coale I sit, 25 

And glow like it. 
Lord, I confesse too, when I dine, 

The Pulse is Thine, 
And all those other Bits, that bee 

There plac'd by Thee ; 30 

The Worts, the Purslain, and the Messe 

Of Water-cresse, 
Which of Thy kindnesse Thou hast sent ; 

And my content 
Makes those, and my beloved Beet, 35 

To be more sweet. 
'Tis Thou that crown'st my glittering Hearth 

With guiltlesse mirth ; 
And giv'st me Wassaile Bowles to drink, 

Spic'd to the brink. 40 

Lord, 'tis thy plenty-dropping hand. 

That soiles my land ; 
And giv'st me, for my Bushell sowne. 

Twice ten for one : 
Thou mak'st my teeming Hen to lay 45 

Her egg each day : 
Besides my healthfull Ewes to beare 

Me twins each yeare : 
The while the conduits of my Kine 

Run Cream e, (for Wine.) 50 



Noble Numbers. 341 

All these, and better Thou dost send 

Me, to this end. 
That I should render, for my part, 

A thankful! heart ; 
Which, fir'd with incense, I resigne, 55 

As wholly Thine ; 
But the acceptance, that must be. 

My Christ, by Thee. 



To God. 

Make, make me Thine, my gracious God, 
Or with thy staffe, or with thy rod ; 
And be the blow too what it will, 
Lord, I will kisse it, though it kill : 
Beat me, bruise me, rack me, rend me. 
Yet, in torments, I'le commend Thee : 
Examine me with fire, and prove me 
To the full, yet I will love Thee : 
Nor shalt thou give so deep a wound, 
But I as patient will be found. 



Another^ to God. 

Lord, do not beat me. 
Since I do sob and crie. 
And swowne away to die. 

Ere Thou dost threat me. 

Lord, do not scourge me, 
If I by lies and oaths 
Have soil'd my selfe, or cloaths. 

But rather purge me. 



None truly happy here. 

Happy's that man, to whom God gives 
A stock of Goods, whereby he lives 
Neer to the wishes of his heart : 
No man is blest through ev'ry part. 



342 Noble Numbers. 

To his ever-loving God. 

Can I not come to Thee, my God, for these 

So very-many-meeting hindrances, 

That slack my pace ; but yet not make me stay ? 

Who slowly goes, rids (in the end) his way. 

Cleere Thou my paths, or shorten Thou my miles, 

Remove the barrs, or lift me o're the stiles : 

Since rough the way is, help me when I call, 

And take me up ; or els prevent the fall. 

I kenn my home ; and it affords some ease, 

To see far off the smoaking Villages. 

Fain would I rest ; yet covet not to die. 

For feare of future-biting penurie : 

No, no, (my God) Thou know'st my wishes be 

To leave this life, not loving it, but Thee. 

Another. 

Thou bidst me come ; I cannot come ; for why, 
Thou dwel'st aloft, and I want wings to flie. 
To mount my Soule, she must have pineons given ; 
For, 'tis no easie way from Earth to Heaven. 

To Death. 

Thou bidst me come away. 
And I'le no longer stay. 
Then for to shed some teares 
For faults of former yeares ; 
And to repent some crimes, 
Done in the present times : 
And next, to take a bit 
Of Bread, and Wine with it : 
To d'on my robes of love. 
Fit for the place above ; 
To gird my loynes about 
With charity throughout , 
And so to travaile hence 
With feet of innocence : 
These done, I'le onely crie 
God mercy ; and so die. 



'S 



Noble Numbers. 343 



Neutrality loathsome. 

God will have all, or none ; serve Him, or fall 
Down before Baal, Bel, or Belial : 
Either be hot, or cold : God doth despise, 
Abhorre, and spew out all Neutralities. 



Welcome what comes. 

Whatever comes, let's be content withall ; 
Among Gods Blessings, there is no one small. 



iTo his angrie God. 

Through all the night 

Thou dost me fright, 
And hold'st mine eyes from sleeping ; 

And day, by day. 

My Cup can say, 5 

My wine is mixt with weeping. 

Thou dost my bread 

With ashes knead. 
Each evening and each morrow : 

Mine eye and eare 10 

Do see, and heare 
The coming in of sorrow. 

Thy scourge of Steele, 

(Ay me !) I feele. 
Upon me beating ever : 15 

While my sick heart 

With dismall smart 
Is disacquainted never. 

Long, long, I'm sure. 

This can't endure ; ao 

But in short time 'twill please Thee, 

My gentle God, 

To burn the rod, 
O strike so as to ease me. 



344 Noble Numbers. 

Patience^ or Comforts in Crosses. 

Abundant plagues I late have had, 
Yet none of these have made me sad : 
For why, my Saviour, with the sense 
Of suffring gives me patience. 

Etemitie. 

1. O Yeares ! and Age ! Farewell : 

Behold I go, 
Where I do know 
Infinitie to dwell. 

2. And these mine eyes shall see 5 

All times, how they 
Are lost i' th' Sea 
Of vast Etemitie. 

3. Where never Moone shall sway 

The Starres ; but she, 10 

And Night, shall be 
Drown'd in one endlesse Day. 

To his Saviour, a Child ; a Present, by a child. 

Go prettie child, and beare this Flower 

Unto thy little Saviour ; 

And tell Him, by that Bud now blown, 

He is the Hose of Sharon known : 

When thou hast said so, stick it there 5 

Upon his Bibb, or Stomacher : 

And tell Him, (for good handsell too) 

That thou hast brought a Whistle new, 

Made of a clean strait oaten reed. 

To charme his cries, (at time of need :) 10 

Tell Him, for Corall, thou hast none ; 

But if thou hadst. He sho'd have one ; 

But poore thou art, and knowne to be 

Even as monilesse, as He. 

Lastly, if thou canst win a kisse i- 

From those mellifluous lips of his ; 

Then never take a second on. 

To spoile the first impression. 



Noble Numbers. 34.5 



The New-yeeres Gift. 

Let others look for Pearle and Gold, 
Tissues, or Tabbies manifold : 
One onely lock of that sweet Hay 
Whereon the blessed Babie lay, 
Or one poore Swadling-clout, shall be 
The richest New-yeeres Gift to me. 

To God. 

If any thing delight me for to print 

My Book, 'tis this ; that Thou, my God, art in't. 

Gody and the King. 

How am I bound to Two ! God, who doth give 
The mind ; the King, the meanes whereby I live. 

Gods mirth, Mans mourning. 

Where God is merry, there write down thy fears : 
What He with laughter speaks, heare thou with tears. 

Honours are hindrances. 

Give me Honours : what are these. 
But the pleasing hindrances ? 
Stiles, and stops, and stayes, that come 
In the way 'twixt me, and home : 
Cleer the walk, and then shall I 
To my heaven lesse run, then flie. 

The Parasceve, or Preparation. 

To a Love-Feast we both invited are : 

The figur'd Damask, or pure Diaper, 

Over the golden Altar now is spread, 

With Bread, and Wine, and Vessells furnished ; 

The sacred Towell, and the }ioly Eure 

Are ready by, to make the Guests all pure : 

Let's go (my Alma) yet e're we receive. 

Fit, fit it is, we have our Parasceve. 

Who to that sweet Bread unprepar'd doth come 

Better he starv'd, then but to tast one crumme. 



346 Noble Numbers. 

To God. 

God gives not onely corne, for need, 
But likewise sup'rabundant seed ; 
Bread for our service, bread for shew ; 
Meat for our meales, and fragments too : 
He gives not poorly, taking some 
Between the finger, and the thumb ; 
But, for our glut, and for our store, 
Fine ilowre prest down, and running o're. 

A will to be working. 

Although we cannot turne the fervent fit 
Of sin, we must strive 'gainst the streame of it : 
And howsoe're we have the conquest mist ; 
'Tis for our glory, that we did resist. 

Christs part. 

Christj He requires still, wheresoere He comes, 
To feed, or lodge, to have the best of Roomes : 
Give Him the choice ; grant Him the nobler part 
Of all the House : the best of all's the Heart. 

Riches and Poverty. 

God co'd have made all rich, or all men poore ; 
But why He did not, let me tell wherefore : 
Had all been rich, where then had Patience been ? 
Had all been poore, who had His Bounty seen ? 

Sobriety in Search. 

To seek of God more then we well can find, 
Argues a strong distemper of the mind. 

Almes. 

Give, if thou canst, an Almes ; if not, afford, 
Instead of that, a sweet and gentle word : 
Gud crowns our goodnesse, where so ere He sees 
On our part, wanting all abilities. 

Almes. 3 where so ere] when I64^ : corr. in orig. Errata 



Noble Numbers. 347 

2o his Conscience. 

Can I not sin, but thou wilt be 

My private Protonotarie ? 

Can I not wooe thee to passe by 

A short and sweet iniquity ? 

I'le cast a mist and cloud, upon 5 

My delicate transgression. 

So utter dark, as that no eye 

Shall see the hug'd impietie : 

Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please, 

And winde all other witnesses : lo 

And wilt not thou, with gold, be ti'd 

To lay thy pen and ink aside ? 

That in the mirk and tonguelesse night. 

Wanton I may, and thou not write ? 

It will not be : And, therefore, now, 15 

For times to come, I'le make this Vow, 

From aberrations to live free ; 

So I'le not feare the Judge, or thee. 

'To his Saviour. 

Lord, I confesse, that Thou alone art able 

To purifie this my Augean stable : 

Be the Seas water, and the Land all Sope, 

Yet if Thy Bloud not wash me, there's no hope. 

To God. 

God is all-suiferance here ; here He doth show 
No Arrow nockt, onely a stringlesse Bow : 
His Arrowes flie ; and all his stones are hurl'd 
Against the wicked, in another world. 

His Dreame. 

I dreamt, last night. Thou didst transfuse 
Oyle from Thy Jarre, into my creuze; 
And powring still. Thy wealthy store. 
The vessell full, did then run ore : 



348 



Noble Numbers. 



Me thought, I did Thy bounty chide, 
To see the waste ; but 'twas repli'd 
By Thee, Deare God, God gives man seed 
Oft-times for wast, as for his need. 
Then I co'd say, that house is bare. 
That has not bread, and some to spare. 



Gods Bounty. 

Gods Bounty, that ebbs lesse and lesse, 
As men do wane in thankfulnesse. 



To his sweet Saviour. 

Night hath no wings, to him that cannot sleep ; 

And Time seems then, not for to flie, but creep ; 

Slowly her chariot drives, as if that she 

Had broke her wheele, or crackt her axeltree. 

Just so it is with me, who list'ning, pray 

The winds, to blow the tedious night away ; 

That I might see the cheerfuU peeping day. 

Sick is my heart ; O Saviour ! do Thou please 

To make my bed soft in my sicknesses : 

Lighten my candle, so that I beneath 

Sleep not for ever in the vaults of death : 

Let me Thy voice betimes i' th morning heare ; 

Call, and I'le come ; say Thou, the when, and where : 

Draw me, but first, and after Thee I'le run, 

And make no one stop, till my race be done 



His Creed. 

I do believe, that die I must, 
And be return'd from out my dust : 
I do believe, that when I rise, 
Christ I shall see, with these same eyes : 
I do believe, that I must come. 
With others, to the dreadfull Doome : 
I do believe, the bad must goe 
From thence, to everlasting woe : 



Noble Numbers. 349 

I do believe, the good, and I, 

Shall live with Him eternally ; lo 

I do believe, I shall inherit 

Heaven, by Christs mercies, not my merit : 

I do believe, the One in Three, 

And Three in perfect Unitie : 

Lastly, that JESUS is a Deed 1 5 

Of Gift from God : And heres my Creed. 

Temptations. 

Temptations hurt not, though they have accesse : 
Satan o'recomes none, but by willingnesse. 

The Lamp. 

When a mans Faith is frozen up, as dead ; 
Then is the Lamp and oyle extinguished. 

Sorrowes. 

Sorrowes our portion are : Ere hence we goe, 
Crosses we must have ; or, hereafter woe. 

Penitencie. 

A mans transgression God do's then remit, 
When man he makes a Penitent for it. 

The Dirge o/'Jephthahs Daughter : sung 
by the Virgins. 

1. O thou, the wonder of all dayes ! 
O Paragon, and Pearle of praise ! 
O Virgin-martyr, ever blest 

Above the rest 
Of all the Maiden-Traine ! We come, 5 

And bring fresh strewings to thy Tombe. 

2. Thus, thus, and thus we compasse round 
Thy harmlesse and unhaunted Ground ; 
And as we sing thy Dirge, we will 

The Daffadill, 10 

And other flowers, lay upon 
(The Altar of our love) thy Stone. 



350 Noble Numbers. 

3. Thou wonder of all Maids, li'st here, 
Of Daughters all, the Deerest Deere ; 

The eye of Virgins ; nay, the Queen 15 

Of this smooth Green, 
And all sweet Meades ; from whence we get 
The Primrose, and the Violet. 

4. Too soon, too deere 6.\d/epkthah buy, 

By thy sad losse, our liberty : so 

His was the Bond and Cov'nant, yet 

Thou paid'st the debt. 
Lamented Maid ! he won the day, 
But for the conquest thou didst pay. 

5. Thy Father brought with him along 25 
The Olive branch, and Victors Song : 

He slew the Ammonites, we know, 

But to thy woe ; 
And in the purchase of our Peace, 
The Cure was worse then the Disease. 30 

6. For which obedient zeale of thine. 
We offer here, before thy Shrine, 
Our sighs for Storax, teares for Wine ; 

And to make fine, 
And fresh thy Herse-cloth, we will, here, 35 . 

Foure times bestrew thee ev'ry yeere. 

7. Receive, for this thy praise, our teares : 
Receive this offering of our Haires : 
Receive these Christall Vialls fil'd 

With teares, distil'd 40 

From teeming eyes ; to these we bring, 
Each Maid, her silver Filleting, 

8. To guild thy Tombe ; besides, these Caules, 
These Laces, Ribbands, and these Faules, 

These Veiles, wherewith we use to hide 45 

The Bashfull Bride, 
When we conduct her to her Groome : 
All, all we lay upon thy Tombe. 

9. No more, no more, since thou art dead. 

Shall we ere bring coy Brides to bed ; jo 



Noble Numbers. 351 

No more, at yeerly Festivalls 

We Cowslip balls, 
Or chaines of Columbines shall make, 
For this, or that occasions sake. 

10. No, no ; our Maiden-pleasures be 55 
Wrapt in the winding-sheet, with thee ; 

'Tis we are dead, though not i' th grave : 

Or, if we have 
One seed of life left, 'tis to keep 
A Lent for thee, to fast and weep. 60 

11. Sleep in thy peace, thy bed of Spice; 
And make this place all Paradise : 

May Sweets grow here ! & smoke from hence, 

Fat Frankincense : 
Let Balme, and Cassia send their scent 65 

From out thy Maiden-Monument. 

12. May no Wolfe howle, or Screech-Owle stir 
A wing about thy Sepulcher ! 

No boysterous winds, or stormes, come hither, 

To starve, or wither 70 

Thy soft sweet Earth ! but (like a spring) 
Love keep it ever flourishing. 

13. May all shie Maids, at wonted liours. 
Come forth, to strew thy Tombe with flow'rs : 

May Virgins, when they come to mourn, 75 

Male-Incense burn 
Upon thine Altar ! then return, 
And leave thee sleeping in thy Urn. 

To God, on his sicknesse. 

What though my Harp, and Violl be 

Both hung upon the Willow-tree ? 

What though my bed be now my grave, 

And for my house I darknesse have ? 

What though my healthfull dayes are fled, S 

And I lie numbred with the dead ? 

Yet I have hope, by Thy great power. 

To spring ; though now a wither'd flower. 



352 Noble Numbers. 

Sins loatKd, and yet lov'd. 

Shame checks our first attempts ; but then 'tis prov'd 
Sins first dislik'd, are after that belov'd. 



Sin. 

Sin leads the way, but as it goes, it feels 

The following plague still treading on his heels. 



Upon God. 

God when He takes my goods and chattels hence 

Gives me a portion, giving patience : 

What is in God is God ; if so it be. 

He patience gives ; He gives himselfe to me. 



Faith. 

What here we hope for, we shall once inherit : 
By Faith we all walk here, not by the Spirit. 



Humility. 

Humble we must be, if to Heaven we go : 
High is the roof there ; but the gate is low : 
When e're thou speak'st, look with a lowly eye 
Grace is increased by humility. 



Teares. 

Our present Teares here (not our present laughter) 
Are but the handsells of our joyes hereafter. 

Sin and Strife. 

After true sorrow for our sinnes, our strife 
Must last with Satan, to the end of life. 



Noble Numbers. 3:5,3 



An Ode^ or Psalme, to God. 

Deer God, 

If thy smart Rod 
Here did not make me sorrie, 

I sho'd not be 

With Thine, or Thee,. 5 

In Thy eternall Glorie. 

But since 

Thou didst convince 
My sinnes, by gently striking ; 

Add still to those xo 

First stripeSj new blowej, 
According to Thy liking. 

Feare me, 

Or scourging teare me ; 
That thus from vices driven, 15 

I may from Hell 

Flie up, to dwell 
With Thee, and Thine in Heaven. 



Graces for Children. 

What God gives, and what we take,. 
'Tis a gift for Christ His sake : 
Be the meale of Beanes and Pease, 
God be thank'd for those, and these . 
Have we flesh, or have we fish. 
All are Fragments from His dish: 
He His Church save, and the King, 
And our Peace here, like a Spring; 
Make it ever flourishing. 



God to be first serv'd. 

Honour thy Parents ; but good manners ca!il 
Thee to- adore thy God, the first of all. 



354 Noble Numbers. 

Another Grace for a Child. 

Here a little child I stand, 

Heaving up my either hand ; 

Cold as Paddocks though they be, 

Here I lift them up to Thee, 

For a Benizon to fall 5 

On our meat, and on us all. Amen. 

A Christmas Caroll, sung to the Xing in the 
Presence at White-Hall. 

Chor. What sweeter musick can we bring, 
Then a Caroll, for to sing 
The Birth of this our heavenly King ? 
Awake the Voice ! Awake the String ! 
Heart, Eare, and Eye, and every thing 5 

Awake ! the while the active Finger 
Runs division with the Singer. 

From the Flourish they came to the Song. 

1. Dark and dull night, flie hence away. 
And give the honour to this Day, 

That sees DecemJ}er turn'd to May. 10 

2. If we may ask the reason, say ; 

The why, and wherefore all things here 
Seem like the Spring-time of the yeere ? 

3. Why do's the chilling Winters mome 

Smile, like a field beset with corne ? 15 

Or smell, like to a Meade new-shorne, 

Thus, on the sudden ? 4. Come and see 

The cause, why things thus fragrant be : 

'Tis He is borne, whose quickning Birth 

Gives life and luster, publike mirth, 20 

To Heaven, and the under-Earth. 

Chor. We see Him come, and know him ours. 

Who, with His Sun-shine, and His showers, 
Turnes all the patient ground to flowers. 



Noble Numbers. ZSS 

I. The Darling of the world is come, 25 

And fit it is, we finde a roome 
To welcome Him. 2. The nobler part 
Of all the house here, is the heart, 

Chor. Which we will give Him ; and bequeath 

This HoUie, and this Ivie Wreath, 30 

To do Him honour ; who's our King, 
And Lord of all this Revelling. 

The Musicall Part was composed by 
M. Henry Lawes. 



The New-yeeres Gift^ or Circumcisions Song, 

sung to the King in the Presence at 

White-Hall. 

1. Prepare for Songs ; He's come, He's come; 
And be it sin here to be dumb, 

And not with Lutes to fill the roome. 

2. Cast Holy Water all about, 

And have a care no fire gos out, 5 

But 'cense the porch, and place throughout. 

3 The Altars all on fier be ; 

The Storax fries ; and ye may see, 
How heart and hand do all agree. 
To make things sweet. Chor. Yet all less sweet then He. 10 

4. Bring Him along, most pious Priest, 
And tell us then, when as thou seest 
His gently-gliding, Dove-like eyes. 

And hear'st His whimp'ring, and His cries ; 

How canst thou this Babe circumcise? ij 

5. Ye must not be more pitifull then wise ; 
For, now unlesse ye see Him bleed. 
Which makes the Bapti'me ; 'tis decreed. 

The Birth is fruitlesse : Chor. Then the work God speed. 



356 



Noble N umber i. 



1. Touch gently, gently touch ; and her© ao 

Spring Tulips up through all the yeere ; 
And from His sacred Bloud, here shed, 
May Roses grow, to crown His own deare Head. 

CAor. Back, back again ; each thing is done 

With zeale alike, as 'twas begun ; 25 

Now singing, homeward list us carrie 
The Babe unto His Mother Marie ; 
And when we have the Child commended 
To her warm bosome, then our Rites- are ended. 

Composed by M. Henry Lawes. 

Another New-yeeres Gift, or Song for 
the Circumcision. 

1. Hence, hence prophane, and none appeare 
With any thing unhallowed, here : 

No jot of Leven must be found 
Conceal'd in this most holy Ground : 

2. What is corrupt, or sowr'd with sin, 5 
Leave that without, then enter in ; 

Chor. But let no Christmas mirth begin 
Before ye purge, and circumcise 
Your hearts, and hands, lips, eares, and eyes. 

3. Then, like a perfum'd Altar, see 10 
That all things sweet, and clean may be : 

For, here's a Babe, that (like a Bridey 
Will blush to death, if ought be spi'd 
Ill-scenting, or unpurifi'd. 

Chor. The room is cens'd : help, help t'invoke 15 

Heaven to come down, the while we choke 
The Temple, withi a cloud of smoke. 

4. Come then, and gently touch- the Birth 

Of Him, who's Lord of Heav'n and Earth ; 

J. And softly handle Him : y'ad need, »o 

Because' the prettie. Babe do's bleed. 
Poore-pittied Child^!: Who from Thy Stall 
Bring'st, in- Thy Blood, a Balm, that shall 
Be the best New-yeares Gift to all. 



Nvhle Numbers. 357 

I. Let's blesse the Babe : And, as we sing 25 

His praise ; so let us blesse the King : 

Chor. Long may He live, till He hath told 
His New-yeeres trebled to His old : 
And, when that's done, to re-aspire 
A new-borne Phoenix from His own chast fire. 30 

Gods Pardan. 

When I shall sin, pardon my trespasse here ; 
For, once in hell, none knowes Remission there. 

Sin. 

Sin once reacht up to Gods eternall Sphere, 
And was committed, not remitted there. 

Evill. 

Evill no Nature hath ; the losse of good 
Is that which gives to sin a livelihood. 

The Star-Song : A Carol! to the King ; 

sung at White-Hall. 

The Flourish of Musick : then followed t/ie Song. 

1. Tell us, thou cleere and heavenly Tongue, 
Where is the Babe but lately sprung ? 
Lies He the Lillie-banks among ? 

2. Or say, if this new Birth of ours 

Sleeps, laid within some Ark of Flowers, S 

Spangled with deaw-light ; thou canst cleere 
All doubts, and manifest the where. 

3. Declare to us, bright Star, if we shall seek 
Him in the Mornings blushing cheek. 

Or search the beds of Spices through, is 

To find him out ? 
Star. No, this ye need not do ; 

But only come, and see Him rest 
A Princely Babe in's Mothers Brest. 



358 Noble Numbers. 



Chor. He's seen, He's seen, why then a Round, 15 

Let's kisse the sweet and holy ground ; 
And all rejoyce^ that we have found 
A King, before conception crowned. 

4. Come then, come then, and let us bring 

Unto our prettie Twelfth-Tide King, 20 

Each one his severall offering ; 

Chor. And when night comes, wee'l give Him wassailing : 
And that His treble Honours may be seen, 
Wee'l chuse Him King, and make His Mother Queen. 

To God. 

With golden Censers, and with Incense, here. 

Before Thy Virgin-Altar I appeare, 

To pay Thee that I owe, since what I see 

In, or without ; all, all belongs to Thee : 

Where shall I now begin to make, for one 5 

Least loane of Thine, half Restitution ? 

Alas ! I cannot pay a jot ; therefore 

I'le kisse the Tally, and confesse the score. 

Ten thousand Talents lent me. Thou dost write : 

'Tis true, my God ; but I can't pay one mite. 10 

To his deere God. 

I'le hope no more, 
For things that will not come : 
And, if they do, they prove but cumbersome ; 

Wealth brings much woe : 
And, since it fortunes so ; 5 

'Tis better to be poore, 

Then so t'abound, 

As to be drown'd. 
Or overwhelm'd with store. 

Pale care, avant, 10 

I'le learn to be content 
With that small stock, Thy Bounty gave or lent 
What may conduce 
To my most healthfull use, 



Noble Numbers. 359 

Almighty God me grant ; 15 

But that, or this, 

That hurtfull is, 
Denie Thy suppliant. 

To God, his good will. 

Gold I have none, but I present my need, 

O Thou, that crown'st the will, where wants the deed. 

Where Ranis are wanting, or large Bullocks thighs, 

There a poor Lamb's a plenteous sacrifice. 

Take then his Vowes, who, if he had it, would 5 

Devote to Ihee, both incense, myrrhe, and gold. 

Upon an Altar rear'd by Him, and crown'd 

Both with the Ruble, Fearle, and Diamond. 

On Heaven. 

Permit mine eyes to see 
Part, or the whole of Thee, 

O happy place ! 

Where all have Grace, 

And Garlands shar'd, S 

For their reward ; 

Where each chast Soule 

In long white stole. 

And Palmes in hand, 

Do ravisht stand ; 10 

So in a ring. 

The praises sing 

Of Three in One, 

That fill the Throne ; 
While Harps, and Violls then 15 

To Voices, say, Amen. 

The Summe, and the Satisfaction. 

Last night I drew up mine Account, 
And found my Debits to amount 
To such a height, as for to tell 
How I sho'd pay, 's impossible : 
Well, this I'le do ; my mighty score 5 

Thy mercy-seat I'le lay before ; 
On Heaven. 15 Violls] Misfrinled Ylolls in iS^y 



360 Noble Numbers. 

But therewithal! lie bring the jBand, 

Which, in full force, idid daring stand, 

Till my Redeemer (on the Tree) 

Made void for millions, as for me. 10 

Then, if Thou bidst me pay, or go 

Unto the prison, I'le say, no ; 

Christ having paid, I nothing owe : 

For, this is sure, the Debt is dead 

By Law, the Bond once cancelled.. 15 

Good men afficted most, 

God makes not good men wantons, but doth bring 

Them to the field, and, there, to skirmishing ; 

With trialls those, with terrors these He proves. 

And hazards those most, whom the most He loves ; 

For Sceva, darts ; for Cocks, dangers ; thus 5 

He finds a fire for mighty Mutius ; 

Death for stout Cato ; and besides all these^ 

A poyson too He has for Socrates ; 

Torments for high Attilius ; and, with want, 

Brings in Fabricius for a Combatarit : 10 

But, bastard-slips, and such as He dislikes, 

He never brings them once to th' push of Pikes. 

Good Christians 

Play their offensive and defensive parts, 
Till they be hid o're with a wood of darts. 

The Will the cause of IVoe. 

When man is punisht, he is plagued still. 
Not for the fault of Nature, but of will. 

To Heaven. 

Open thy gates 
To him, who weeping waits. 

And might come in. 
But that Wd back by sin. 

Let mercy be k 

So kind, to set me free. 

And I will strait 
Come in, or force the gate. 



Noble Numbers. 361 



The Recompence. 
All I have lost, that co'd be rapt from me ; 
And fare it well : yet Herrick, if so be 
Thy Deerest Saviour renders thee but one 
Smile, that one smile's full restitution. 

To God. 

Pardon me God, (once more I Thee intreat) 
That I have plac'd Thee in so meane a seat. 
Where round about Thou seest but all things vaine, 
Uncircumcis'd, unseason'd, and prophane. 
But as Heavens publike and immortall Eye 
Looks on the filth, but is not soil'd thereby ; 
So Thou, my God, may'st on this impure look, 
But take no tincture from my sinfuU Bookj 
Let but one beame of Glory on it shine. 
And that will make me, and my Work divine- 
To God. 

Lord, I am like to Misletoe, 
Which has no root, and cannot grow, 
Or prosper, but by that same tree 
It clings about ; so I by Thee. 
What need I then to feare at all. 
So long as I about Thee craule? 
But if that Tree sho'd fall, and die. 
Tumble shall heay'n, and down will I. 

His wish to God. 

I would to God, that mine old age might have 

Before my last, but here a living grave. 

Some one poore Almes-house ; there to lie, or stir, 

Ghost-like, as in my meaner sepulcber ; 

A little piggin, and a pipkin by, 

To hold things fitting my necessity ; 

Which, rightly us'd, both in their time and place. 

Might me excite to fore, and after-grace. 

Thy Crosse, my Christ, fixt 'fore mine eyes sho'd be, 

Not to adore that, but to worship Thee. 

So, here the remnant of my dayes I'd spend, 

Reading Thy Bible, and my Book; so£nd. 



362 



Noble Numbers. 



Satan. 



When we 'gainst Satan stoutly fight, the more 
He teares and tugs us, then he did before ; 
Neglecting once to cast a frown on those 
Whom ease makes his, without the help of blowes. 



Hell. 

Hell is no other, but a soundlesse pit. 
Where no one beame of comfort peeps in it. 



7he way. 

When I a ship see on the Seas, 
Cuft with those watrie savages. 
And therewithal!, behold, it hath 
In all that way no beaten path ; 
Then, with a wonder, I confesse, 
Thou art our way i'th wildernesse : 
And while we blunder in the dark. 
Thou art our candle there, or spark. 

Great ^ief, great glory. 

The lesse our sorrowes here and suffrings cease, 
The more our Crownes of Glory there increase. 

Hell. 

Hell is the place where whipping-cheer abounds. 
But no one Jailor there to wash the wounds. 



The Bell-man. 

Along the dark, and silent night. 
With my Lantern, and my Light, 
And the tinkling of my Bell, 
Thus I walk, and this I tell : 



Noble Numbers, 363 



Death and dreadfulnesse call on, 
To the gen'rall Session ; 
To whose dismall Barre, we there 
All accompts must come to cleere : 
Scores of sins w'ave made here many, 
Wip't out few, (God knowes) if any. 
Rise ye Debters then, and fall 
To make paiment, while I call. 
Ponder this, when I am gone ; 
By the clock 'tis almost One. 



'The goodnesse of his God. 

When Winds and Seas do rage. 

And threaten to undo me, 
Thou dost their wrath asswage 

If I but call unto Thee. 

A mighty storm last night 

Did seek my soule to swallow, 

But by the peep of light 
A gentle calme did follow. 

What need I then despaire, 

Though ills stand round about me ; 
Since mischiefs neither dare 

To bark, or bite, without Thee ? 



The Widdowes teares : or, Dirge 
of Dorcas. 

Come pitie us, all ye, who see 
Our Harps hung on the Willow-tree : 
Come pitie us, ye Passers by, 
Who see, or heare poor Widdowes crie : 
Come pitie us ; and bring your eares, S 

And eyes, to pitie Widdowes teares. 
CAar. And when you are come hither; 

Then we will keep 

A Fast, and weep 
Our eyes out all together. lo 



364 



Noble Numbers. 



For Tabitha, who dead lies here, 

Clean washt, and laid out for the BeeFC ; 

modest Matrons, weep and waile I 
For now the Come and Wine must faile : 

The Basket and the Bynn of Bread, 15 

Wherewith so many soules were fed 
Chor. Stand empty here for ever ; 
And ah ! the Poore, 
At thy worne Doore, 
Shall be releeved never. zo 

Woe worth the Time, woe worth the day. 
That reav'd us of thee TaJ>itha I 
For we have lost, with thee, the Meale, 
The Bits, the Morsells, and the deale 

Of gentle Paste, and yeelding Dow, 25 

That Thou on Widdowes didst bestow. 
Chor. All's gone, and Death hath taken 

Away from us 

Our Maundie ; tlius, 
Thy Widdowes stand forsaken. 30 

Ah Dorcas, Dorcas ! now adieu 
We bid the Creuse and Pannier too : 

1 and the flesh, for and the fish, 
Dol'd to us in That Lordly dish. 

We take our leaves now of the Loome, 35 

From whence the house-wives cloth did come : 
Chor. The web affords now nothing ; 
Thou being dead, 
The woosted thred 
Is cut, that made us clcrthing. 40 

. Farewell the Flax and Reaming wooll, 
With which thy house was plentiful!. 
Farewell the Coats, the Garments, and 
The Sheets, the Rugs, made by thy hand. 
Farewell thy Fier and thy Light, 45 

That ne're went out by Day or Night : 
Chor. No, or thy zeale so speedy, 
That found a way 
By peep of day. 
To feed and cloth the Needy. 50 



Noble Numbers. 365 

But, ah, alas ! the Ahnond Bough, 

And Olive Branch is wither'd now. 

The Wine Presse now is ta'ne from us, 

The Saffron and the Calamus. 

The Spice and Spiknard hence is. gone, i;5 

The Storax and the Cynamon, 

C}ior. The Caroll of our gladnesse 

Ha's taken wing, 

And our late spring 
Of mirth is turn'd to sadnesse. 60 

How wise wast thou in all thy waies ! 
How worthy of respect and praise ! 
How Matron-like didst thou go drest ! 
How soberly above the rest 

Of those that prank it with their Plumes ; 65 

And jet it with their choice purfumes. 
Chor. Thy vestures were not flowing : 
Nor did the street 
Accuse thy feet 
Of mincing in their going. 7° 

And though thou here li'st dead, we see 
A deale of beauty yet in thee. 
How sweetly shewes thy smiUng face. 
Thy lips with all diffused grace ! 

Thy hands (though cold) yet spotlesse, white, fs 

And comely as the Chrysolite. 
Chor. Thy belly like a hill is, 

Or as a neat 

Cleane heap of wheat, 
All set about with Lillies. 80 

Sleep with thy beauties here, while we 
Will shew these garments made by thee ; 
These were the Coats, in these are read 
The monuments of Dorcas dead. 

These were thy Acts, and thou shalt have 85 

These hung, as honours o're thy Grave, 
Chor. And after us (distressed) 

Sho'd fame be dumb ; 

Thy very Tomb 
Would cry out, Thou art blessed. 90 



366 Noble Numbers. 

To God, in time of plundering. 

Rapine has yet tooke nought from me ; 
But if it please my God, I be 
Brought at the last to th' utmost bit, 
God make me thankfuU still for it. 
I have been gratefull for my store : 
Let me say grace when there's no more. 

To his Saviour. The New yeers gift. 

That little prettie bleeding part 

Of Foreskin send to me : 
And He returne a bleeding Heart, 

For New-yeers gift to thee. 

Rich is the Jemme that thou did'st send, 

Mine's faulty too, and small : 
But yet this Gift Thou wilt commend, 

Because I send Thee all. 

TDoomes-Day. 

Let not that Day Gods Friends and Servants scare ; 
The Bench is then their place ; and not the Barre. 

The Poores Portion. 

The sup'rabundance of my store, 
That is the portion of the poore : 
Wheat, Barley, Rie, or Oats ; what is't 
But he takes tole of? all the Griest. 
Two raiments have I : Christ then makes 
This Law ; that He and I part stakes. 
Or have I two loaves ; then I use 
The poore to cut, and I to chuse. 

The white Island : or place of the Blest. 

In this world (the Isle of Dreames) 
While we sit by sorrowes streames, 
Teares and terrors are our theames 
Reciting : 



Noble Numbers. 367 

But when once from hence we flie, 5 

More and more approaching nigh 
Unto young Eternitie 

Uniting : 

In that whiter Island, where 

Things are evermore sincere ; 10 

Candor here, and lustre there 

Delighting : 

There no monstrous fancies shall 
Out of hell an horrour call, 

To create (or cause at all) 15 

Affrighting. 

There in calm and cooling sleep 
We our eyes shall never steep ; 
But eternal! watch shall keep, 

Attending ao 

Pleasures, such as shall pursue 
Me immortaliz'd, and you ; 
And fresh joyes, as never too 

Have ending. 



To Christ. 

I crawle, I creep ; my Christ, I come 
To Thee, for curing Balsamum : 
Thou hast, nay more. Thou art the Tree, 
Affording salve of Soveraigntie. 
My mouth I'le lay unto Thy wound 
Bleeding, that no Blood touch the ground : 
For, rather then one drop shall fall 
To wast, my JESU, I'le take all. 



To God. 

God ! to my little meale and oyle, 
Add but a bit of flesh, to boyle : 
And Thou my Pipkinnet shalt see, 
Give a wave-offring unto Thee. 



36b 



Nahk Numbers. 



Free Weltome. 



God He refuseth no man ; but makes way 
For All that now come, or hereafter may. 

Gods Grace. 

Gods Grace deserves here to be daily fed. 
That, thus increast, it might be perfected. 

Coming to Christ. 

To him, who longs unto his CHRIST to go. 
Celerity even it self is slow. 

Correction. 

God had but one Son free from sin ; but none 
Of all His sonnes free from correction. 

Gods B'ounty. 

God, as He's potent, so He's likewise known, 
To give us more then Hope can fix upon. 

Knowledge. 

Science in God, is known to be 
A Substance, not a Qualkie. 

S.alutation. 

Christ, I have read, did to His Chaplains say, 
Sending them fbrth, Salute no man by tK way : 
Not, that' He taught His Ministers to be 
Unsmooth, or sowre, to all civilitie ; 
But to instruct them, to avoid all snares 
Of tardidation in the Lords Affaires. 
Manners are good : but till his errand ends. 
Salute we must, nor Straagersi Kin, or Friends. 

Lasciviousnesse. 

Lasciviousnesse. is known.! to be 
The sister to saturitie. 



Noble Numbers. 369 



Teares. 

God from our eyes all teares hereafter wipes, 
And gives His Children kisses then, not stripes. 

Gods Blessing. 

In vain our labours are, whatsoe're they be, 
Unlesse God gives the Benedicite. 

God, and Lord. 

God, is His Name of Nature ; but that word 
Implies His Power, when He's cal'd the LORD, 

The Judgment-Day. 

God hides from man the reck'ning Day, that He 
May feare it ever for uncertaintie : 
That being ignorant of that one, he may 
Expect the coming of it ev'ry day. 

Angells. 

Angells are called Gods ; yet of them, none 
Are Gods, but by participation : 
As just Men are intitled Gods, yet none 
Are Gods, of them, but by Adoption. 

Long life. 

The longer thred of life we spin, 
The more occasion still to sin. 

Teares. 

The teares of Saints more sweet by farre. 
Then all the songs of sinners are. 

Manna. 

That Manna, wh.ch God on His people cast. 
Fitted it self to ev'ry Feeders tast. 



370 Nobl^ Nun^bgr^. 

Re^ere^ce. 

True rev'repce is (as Cassiodpre dat;h proye) 
Thg /eaje pf God, jCpnimix,t with cleanly love 

Mercy. 

Mercy, the wise Athenians held to be 
Not an Affection, but a Deiiie. 

Wages. 

A{f.px this life, tjhe wages shall 
Not sh'ar'd alike be unto all. " 

Temptation. 

God tempteth no one (^s S. j^ug'siine saith) 
For any ilj ; but, fpj: the proof of paitfi : 
Unto temptation God e;xpqsetji some ; 
But none, of purpose', to be overcome. 

Gods hands. 

Gods Hands are round, & smopth, that gifts may fall 
Freely from them, and hold none back at all. ' 

Labour. 

Labour we must, and labour hard 
I'th Forum here, ox Vineyard. '" '' 

Mora Sponsi, the stay of the Bridegroome. 

The time the Bridegroom stayes frpm hence. 
Is but the time of penitence^ - • ■ ., 

Roaring. 

Roaricg is npthing but a \yeeping part, 
Forc'd from the mighty dolour of the heart. 



Noble Numbers, 371 



The Eucharist. 

He that is hurt seeks help : sin is the wound j, 
The salve for this i'th Eucharist is found. 

Sin severely punisht. 

God in His own Day will be then severe, 

To punish great sins, who small faults whipt here. 

Montes Scripturarum, the Mounts of 

the Scriptures. 

The Mountains of the Scriptures are (sorne say) 
Moses, a.T\d Jesus, called Joshua : 
The PropMts Mountains of the Old are meant ; 
Th' Apostles Mounts of the Neiv Testament. 

Prayer. 

A prayer, that is said alone, 

Starves, having no companion. 

Great things ask for, when thou dost pray. 

And thos,e great are, which ne're decay. 

Pray not for silver, rust eats this ; 

Ask not for gold, which metall is : 

Nor yet for houses, which are here 

But earth : such vowes nere reach Gods eare. 

Christs sadnesse. 

Christ was not sad, i'th garden, for His own 
Passion, but for His sheeps dispersion. 

God heares us. 

God, who's in Heav'n, will hear from thence , 
If not to'th sound, yet, to the sense. 

God. 

God (as the learned Damascen doth write) 
A Sea of Substance is, Indefinite. 



372 Noble Numbers. 



Clouds. 

He that ascended in a cloud, shall come 
In clouds, descending to the publike Doome. 

Comforts in contentions. 

The same, who crownes the Conquerour, will be 
A Coadjutor in the Agonie. 

Heaven. 

Heav'n is most faire ; but fairer He 
That made that fairest Canopie. 

God. 

In God there's nothing, but 'tis known to be 
Ev'n God Himself, in perfect Entitle. 

His Power. 

God can do all things, save but what are known 
For to imply a contradiction. 

Christs words on the Crosse, My God, My God. 

Christ, when He hung the dreadfull Crosse upon, 

Had (as it were) a Dereliction ; 

In this regard, in those great terrors He 

Had no one JBeame from Gods sweet Majestie. 

JEHOVAH. 

Jehovah, as Boetius saith. 

No number of the Flurall hath. 

Confusion of face. 

God then confounds mans face, when He not hears 
The Vowes of those, who are Petitioners. 



Noble Numbers. 373 



Another. 

The shame of mans face is no more 
Then prayers repel'd, (sayes Cassiodore) 

Beggars. 

Jacob Gods Beggar was ; and so we wait 
(Though ne're so rich) all beggars at His Gate. 

Good, and bad. 

The Bad among the Good are here mixt ever : 
The Good without the Bad are here plac'd never. 

Sin. 

Sin no Existence ; Nature none it hath. 
Or Good at all, (as learn'd Aquinas saith.) 

Martha, Martha. 

The repetition of the name made known 
No other, then Christs full Affection. 



Youth, and Age. 

God on our Youth bestowes but little ease ; 
But on our Age most sweet Indulgences 



Gods power. 

God is so potent, as His Power can. 
Draw out of bad a soveraigne good to man. 



Faradise. 

Paradise is (as from the Learn'd I gather) 
A quire of blest Souks circling in the Fctther. 



374 Noble Numbers. 

Observation. 

The Jewes, when they built Houses (I have read) 
One part thereof left still unfinished : 
To make them, thereby, mindfull of their own 
Cities most sad and dire destruction. 

'The Asse. 

God did forbid the Israelites, to bring 
An Asse unto Him, for an offering : 
Onely, by this dull creature, to expresse 
His detestation to all slothfulnesse. 

Observation. 

The Virgin-Mother stood at distance (there) 

From her Sonnes Crosse, not shedding once a teare : 

Because the Law forbad to sit and crie 

For those, who did as malefactors die. 

So she, to keep her mighty woes in awe, 

Tortur'd her love, not to transgresse the Law. 

Observe we may, how Mary Joses then, 

And th' other Mary {Mary Magdalen) 

Sate by the Grave ; and sadly sitting there. 

Shed for their Master many a bitter teare : 

But 'twas not till their dearest Lord was dead ; 

And then to weep they both were licensed. 

Tapers. 

Those Tapers, which we set upon the grave. 
In fun'rall pomp, but this importance have ; 
That soules departed are not put out quite ; 
But, as they walk't here in their vestures white, 
So live in Heaven, in everlasting light. 

Christs Birth. 

One Birth our Saviour had ; the like none yet 
Was, or will be a second like to it. 

The Virgin Mary. 

To work a wottder, God would have her shown. 
At once, a Bud, and ye.i &■ Ross ^ull-blpwne.. 



Noble Numbers. 37^ 



Another. 

As Sun-beames pierce the glasse,- and streaming in, 
No crack or Schisme leave i'th subtili skin : 
So the Divine Hand work't, and brake no thred, 
But, in d. Mother, kept a maiden-head. 

God. 

God, in the holy Tongue, they call 
The Place tliat filleth All in all. 

Another of God. 

God's said to leave this place,' and for to come 
Nearer to that place, then to other some : 
Of locall motion, in no least respect. 
But only by impression of effect. 

Another. 

God \i Jehovah cal'd ; which name of His 
Implies or Essence, or the He that Is. 

Gods presence. 

God's evident, and may be said to be 
Present with just men, to the veritie : 
But with the wicked if He doth comply, 
'Tis (as S. Bernard saith) but seemingly. 

Gods dwelling. 

God's said to dwell there, wheresoever He 
Puts down some prints of His high Majestic : 
As when to man He comes, and there doth place 
His holy Spirit, or doth plant His Grace. 

The Virgin' Mary. 

The Virgin Marie was (as I haVe read) 
The Bouse of God, by Christ mhabiied; 
Into the virhich He ehteir'd : but, the Doore 
Once shut, was never to be open'd more,- 



376 



Noble Numbers. 



'To God. 



God's undivided, One in Persons Three ; 

And Three in Inconfused Unity : 

Originall of Essence there is none 

'Twixt God the Father, Holy Ghost, and Sonne : 

And though the Father be the first of Three, 

'Tis but by Order, not by Entitle. 

Upon Woman and Mary. 

So long (it seem'd) as Maries Faith was small, 
Christ did her Woman, not her Mary call : 
But no more Woman, being strong in Faith ; 
But Mary cal'd then (as S. Ambrose saith). 

North and South. 

Thejewes their beds, and offices of ease, 

Plac't North and South, for these cleane purposes ; 

That mans uncomely froth might not molest 

Gods wayes and walks, which lie still East and West. 

Sabbaths. 

Sabbaths are threefold, (as S. Austtne sayes :) 
The first of Time, or Sabbath here of Dayes ; 
The second is a Conscience trespasse-free ; 
The last the Sabbath of Eternltie. 

The Fast, or Lent. 

Noah the first was (as Tradition sayes) 
That did ordaine the Fast of forty Dayes. 

Sin. 

There is no evill that we do commit. 
But hath th' extraction of some good from it : 
As when we sin ; God, the great Chymlst, thence 
Drawes out th' Ellxar of true penitence. 



Noble Numbers. 377 



God. 

God is more here, then in another place, 
Not by His Essence, but commerce of Grace. 

This^ and the next World. 

God hath this world for many made ; 'tis true : 
But He hath made the world to come for few. 

Ease. 

God gives to none so absolute an Ease, 
As not to know, or feel some Grievances. 

Beginnings and Endings. 

Paul, he began ill, but he ended well ; 
Judas began well, but he foulely fell : 
In godlinesse, not the beginnings, so 
Much as the ends are to be lookt unto. 

Temporal! goods. 

These temp'rall goods God (the most Wise) commends 
To th' good and bad, in common, for two ends 
First, that these goods none here may o're esteem, 
Because the wicked do partake of them : 
Next, that these ills none cowardly may shun ; 
Being, oft here, the just mans portion. 

Hell fire. 

The fire of Hell this strange condition hath. 
To burn, not shine (as learned Basil saith.) 

Abels Bloud. 

Speak, did the Bloud of Abel cry 
To God for vengeance ? yes say I ; 
Ev'n as the sprinkled blou4 cal'd on 
God, for an expiation, 



3 7 8 Noble Numbers. 

Another. 

The bloud of Abel was a thing' 
Of such a rev'rend reckoning, 
As that the old World thought it fit, 
Especially to sweare by it. 

A Position in the Hebrew Divinity. 

One man repentkrit is of more esteem 

With God, then one, that never sin'd 'gainst Him. 

Penitence. 

The Doctors, in the Talmud, say, 
That in this world, one onely day 
In true repentance spent, will be 
More worth, then Heav'ns Eternitie. 

Gods Presence. 

God's present ev'ry where ; but most of all 
Present by Union Hypoitaticall -. 
God, He is there, where's nothing else (^Schooles say) 
And nothing else is there, where He's away. 

The Resurrection possible, afid probable: 

For each one Body, that i'th earth is sowne. 

There's an up-rising but of one for one : 

But for each Graine, that in the ground is thrown. 

Threescore or fourescore spring up thence for one : 

So that the wonder is not halfe so great. 

Of ours, as is the rising of the wheat. 

Christs suffering. 

Justly our dearest Saviour may abhorre us, 
Who hath more suffer'd by us farre, then for us. 

Sinners. 

Sinners confounded are a twofold way, 
Either as when (the learned Schoolemen say) 
Mens sins destroyed aire, when they repeiit ; 
Or when, for sins, men suffer punishmfent.- 



Noble Numbers. ^79 

Temptations. 



No man is tempted so, but may o'recome, 
If that he has a will to Masterdome. 

Pitiie^ and punishment. 

God doth embrace the good with love ; & gaines 
The good by mercy, as the bad by paines. 

Gods pricey and mans price. 

God bought man here wtl* his hearts blood expence ; 
And man sold God here for base thirty pence. 

Christs Action. 

Christ never did so great a work, but there 
His humane Nature did, in part, appeare : 
Or, ne're so meane a peece, but men might see 
Therein some beames of His Divinitie : 
So that, in all He did, there did combine 
His Humane Nature, and His Part Divine. 

Predestination. 

Predestination is the Cause alone 
Of many standing, but of fall to none. 

Another. 

Art thou not destin'd ? then, with hast, go on 
To make thy faire Predestination : 
If thou canst change thy life, God then will please 
To change, or call back, His past Sentences. 

Sin. 

Sin never slew a soule, unlesse there went 
Along with it some tempting blandishment. 

Another. 

Sin is an act so free, that if we shall 
Say, 'tis not free, 'tis then no sin at all. 



38o 



Noble Numbers. 



Another. 



Sin is the cause of death ; and sin's alone 
The cause of Gods Predestination : 
And from Gods Prescience of mans sin doth flow 
Our Destination to eternall woe. 



Fresdence. 

Gods Prescience makes none sinfull; but th' offence 
Of man's the chief cause of Gods Prescience. 



Christ. 

To all our wounds, here, whatsoe're they be, 
Christ is the one sufficient Pemedie. 



Christ! Incarnation. 

Christ took our Nature on Him, not that He 
'Bove all things lov'd it, for the puritie : 
No, but He drest Him with our humane Trim, 
Because our flesh stood most in need of Him. 



Heaven. 

Heaven is not given for our good works here : 
Yet it is given to the Labourer. 

Gods keyes. 

God ha.5foure keyes, which He reserves alone ; 
The first of Raine, the key of Hell next known : 
With the third key He opes and shuts the wombe ; 
And with the fourth key He unlocks the tombe. 

Sin. 

There's no constraint to do amisse. 
Whereas but one enforcement is. 



Noble Numbers. 381 



Almes. 

Give unto all, lest he, whom thou deni'st. 
May chance to be no other man, but Christ. 

Hell fire. 

One onely fire has Hell ; but yet it shall. 
Not after one sort, there excruciate all : 
But look, how each transgressor onward went 
Boldly in sin, shall feel more punishment. 

To keep a true Lent. 

1. Is this a Fast, to keep 

The Larder leane ? 
And cleane 
From fat of Veales, and Sheep ? 

2. Is it to quit the dish 5 

Of Flesh, yet still 
To fill 
The platter high with Fish ? 

3. Is it to fast an houre, 

Or rag'd to go, 10 

Or show 
A down-cast look, and sowre ? 

4. No : 'tis a Fast, to dole 

Thy sheaf of wheat, 

And meat, 15 

Unto the hungry Soule. 

5. It is to fast from strife, 

From old debate. 

And hate ; 
To circumcise thy life. 20 

6. To shew a heart grief-rent ; 

To sterve thy sin, 
Not Bin ; 
And that's to keep thy Lent. 



382 Noble Numbers. 



No time in Eternitie. 

By houres we all live here, in Heaven is known 
No spring of Time, or Times succession. 

His Meditation upon Death. 

Be those few hours, whicjh I have yet to spend, 

Blest with the Meditation of my end : 

Though they be few in number, I'm content ; 

If otherwise, I stand indifferent : , 

Nor makes it matter, Nestors years to tell, 5 

If man lives long, and if he live not well. 

A multitude of dayes still heaped on, 

Seldome brings order, but confusion. 

Might I make choice, long life sho'd be with-stood ; 

Nor wo'd I care how short it were, if good : 10 

Which to effect, let ev'ry passing Bell 

Possesse my thoughts, next comes my dolefull knell : 

And when the night perswad,es me fp my bed, 

I'le thinke I'm going to be buried : 

So shall the Blankets which come over me, 15 

Present those Turfs, which once must cover me : 

And with as firme behaviour I will meet 

The sheet I sleep in, as my Winding-sheet. 

When sleep shall bath his body in mine eyes, 

I will believe, that then my body dies : 20 

And if I chance to wake, and rise thereon, 

I'le have in mind my Resurrection, 

Which must produce me to that Gen'rail Doome, 

To which the Pesant, so the Prince rnust come. 

To heare the Judgp give sentence on the Throne, 25 

Without the least hope of affection. 

Teares, at that day, shall make but weake defence ; 

When Hell and Horrpur fright the Conscience. 

Let me, though late, yet at the last, begin 

To shun the least Temptation to a sin ; 30 

Though to be tempted be no sin, untill 

Man to th' alluring object gives his will. 

Such let my life assure me, when my breath 

Goes theeving from me, I am safe in death • 

Which is the height of comfort, when 1 fall, 35 

I rise triumphant in my Funerall. 



^oble Number ^. 383 

Ckflfh^fQr Continuance. 

Those Garnjents lasting evermore, 
Are worUs of mercy to the ppore, 
Which rieither Tettar, Time, or Mpth 
Shall fray that silke, or fret this cloth- 

To God. 

Come to me God ; bijt do not come 

To rne, as ^o tlje gep'rall Doonie, 

In power ; ,or come f hou in that state, 

When Thou Thy Lawes didst promulgate. 

When as the Mountains quak'd for dread, 5 

And sullen clouds bound up his head. 

No, lay thy stately terrours by, 

To talke'with me familiarly ; 

For if Thy thiinder-claps I heare, 

I shall lesse swoone, then die for feare. lo 

Speake thou of loye and J'le reply 

By way of £pithalamie, 

Or sing of mercy, and I'Je suit 

To it my Violl and my Lute : 

Thus let Thy lips but love distill, 15 

Then come my God, and hap what will. 

The Souk. 

When once the goule has lost her way, 
O tiien, how restlesse do's sfie stray ! 
And having not her God for light. 
How do's she erre in endlesse night ! 

The Judgement day. 

In doing justice, Gqd sliall then be knpjyn, 
Whp shewing inercy herp, few priz'fi, or none. 

Sufferings. 

We merit all we suffer, and by f^r 

More stripes, then God I'ayes on the sufferer 

To Gj!4. 5 Mountains] Moijntain rfl«/'. Pollard {to s,ujt\i\f. of 1- is) 



384 Noble Numbers. 

Paine and pleasure. 

God suflfers not His Saints, and Servants deere, 
To have continuall paine, or pleasure here : 
But look how night succeeds the day, so He 
Gives them by turnes their grief and jolUtie. 

Gods presence. 

God is all-present to what e're we do. 
And as all-present, so all-filling too. 

Another. 

That there's a God, we all do know. 
But what God is, we cannot show. 

The poore mans part. 

Tell me rich man, for what intent 
Thou load'st with gold thy vestiment ? 
When as the poore crie out, to us 
Belongs all gold superfluous. 

The right hand. 

God has a Right Hand, but is quite bereft 
Of that, which we do nominate the Left. 

The Staffe and Rod. 

Two instruments belong unto our God ; 
The one a Staffe is, and the next a Jiod : 
That if the twig sho'd chance too much to smart. 
The staffe might come to play the friendly part. 

God sparing in scourging. 

God still rewards us more then our desert : 
But when He strikes, He quarter-acts His part. 



Noble Numbers. 385 

Confession. 

Confession twofold is (as Austine sayes,) 

The first oi sin is, and the next ol praise : 

If ill it goes with thee, thy faults confesse : 

If well, then chant Gods praise with cheerfulnesse. 

Gods Descent. 

God is then said for to descend, when He 
Doth, here on earth, some thing of novitie ; 
As when, in humane nature He works more 
Then ever, yet, the like was done before. 

No coming to God without Christ. 

Good and great God! How sho'd I feare 

To come to Thee, if Christ not there ! 

Co'd I but think, He would not be 

Present, to plead my cause for me; 

To Hell I'a rather run, then I 5 

Wo'd see Thy Face, and He not by. 

Another, to God. 

Though Thou beest all that Active Love, 

Which heats those ravisht Soules above ; 

And though all joyes spring from the glance 

Of Thy most winning countenance ; 

Yet sowre and grim Thou'dst seem to me ; 5 

If through my Christ I saw not Thee. 

The Resurrection. 

That Christ did die, the Pagan saith ; 
But that He rose, that's Christians Faith. 

Coheires. 

We are Coheires with Christ ; nor shall His own 
Heire-ship be lesse, by our adoption : 
The number here of Heires, shall from the state 
Of His great Birth-right nothing derogate. 



386 Noble Numbers. 

The number of two. 

God hates the Dualt Number ; beiftg knowfi 

The lucklesse number of division : 

And when He blest each sev'rall Daiy, whereon 

He did His curious operation ; 

'Tis never read there (as the Fathers say) 

God blest His work done on the second day : 

Wherefore two prayers ought not to be said, 

Or by our selves, or from the Pulpit read. 

Hardning of hearts. 

God's said our hearts to harden then, 
When as His grace not supples men. 

The Rose. 

Before Mans fall, the Rose was born 
(S. Ambrose sayes) without the Thorn : 
But, for Mans fault, then was the Thorn, 
Without the fragrant Rose-bud, born ; 
But ne're the Rofee without the Thorn. 



Gods time must end our trouble. 

God doth not promise here to man, that He 
Will free him quickly from his miserie ; 
But in His own tirtie, and when He thinks fit, 
Then He will give a happy end to it. 

Baptisme. 

The strength of Baptisme, that's within ; 
It saves the soule, by drowning sin. 

Gold and Frankincense. 

Gold serves for Tribute to the King ; 
The Frankincense for Gods Offring. 



Noble Numbers. 387 



To God. 

God, who me gives a will for to repent, 
Will add a power, to keep me innocent ; 
That I shall ne're that trespasse recommit, 
When I have done true Penance here for it. 



The chewing the Cud. 

When well we speak, & nothing do that's good, 

We not divide the Hoof, but chew the Cud : 

But when good words, by good works, have their proof. 

We then both chew the Cud, and cleave the Hoof. 



Christs twofold coming. 

Thy former coming was to cure 
My soul'es most desp'rate Catenture j 
Thy second Advent, that must be 
To heale my Earths infirmitie. 



To God, his gift. 

As my little Pot doth boyle, 
We will keep this Levell-Coyle ; 
That a Wave, and I will bring 
To my God, a Heave-offering. 



Gods Anger. 

God can't be wrathfull ; but we may conclude, 
Wrathfull He may be, by similitude : 
God's wrathfull said to be, when He doth do 
That without wrath, which wrath Aoth force us to. 



Gods Commands. 

In Gods commands, ne're ask the reason why ; 
X.et thy obedience be the best Reply. 



388 



Noble Numbers. 



To God. 



If I have plaid the Truant, or have here 
Fail'd in my part ; O ! Thou that art my deare. 
My mild, my loving Tutor, Lord and God t 
Correct my errors gently with Thy Rod, 
I know, that faults will many here be found, 
But where sin swells, there let Thy grace abound. 



To God. 

The work is done ; now let my Lawrell be 
Given by none, but by Thy selfe, to me : 
That done, with Honour Thou dost me create 
Thy Poet, and Thy Prophet Lawreat. 



Good Friday : Rex Tragicus, or Christ going 
to His Crosse. 

Put off Thy Robe of Purple, then go on 

To the sad place of execution : 

Thine houre is come ; and the Tormentor stands 

Ready, to pierce Thy tender Feet, and Hands. 

Long before this, the base, the dull, the rude, 5 

Th' inconstant, and unpurged Multitude 

Yawne for Thy coming ; some e're this time crie. 

How He deferres, how loath He is to die ! 

Amongst this scumme, the Souldier, with his speare, 

And that sowre Fellow, with his vineger, lo 

His spunge, and stick, do ask why Thou dost stay ? 

So do the Skurfe and Bran too : Go Thy way. 

Thy way, Thou guiltlesse man, and satisfie 

By Thine approach, each their beholding eye. 

Not as a thief, shalt Thou ascend the mount, 15 

But like a Person of some high account : 

The Crosse shall be Thy Stage ; and Thou shalt there 

The spacious field have for Thy Theater. 

Thou art that Roscius, and that markt-out man. 

That must this day act the Tragedian, 20 

To wonder and affrightment : Thou art He, 



Noble Numbers. 389 

Whom all the flux of Nations comes to see ; 

Not those poor Theeves that act their parts with Thee : 

Those act without regard, when once a King, 

And God, as Thou art, comes to suffering. 25 

No, No, this Scene from Thee takes life and sense, 

And soule and spirit plot, and excellence. 

Why then begin, great King ! ascend Thy Throne, 

And thence proceed, to act Thy Passion 

To such an height, to such a period rais'd, 30 

As Hell, and Earth, and Heav'n may stand amaz'd. 

God, and good Angells guide Thee ; and so blesse 

Thee in Thy severall parts of bitternesse ; 

That those, who see Thee nail'd unto the Tree, 

Ma:y (though they scorn Thee) praise and pitie Thee. 35 

And we (Thy Lovers) while we see Thee keep 

The Lawes of Action, will both sigh, and weep ; 

And bring our Spices, to embalm Thee dead j 

That done, wee'l see Thee sweetly buried. 



His words to Christ, going to the Crosse. 

When Thou wast taken. Lord, I oft have read, 
All Thy Disciples Thee forsook, and fled. 
Let their example not a pattern be 
For me to flie, but now to follow Thee. 



Another, to his Saviour. 

If Thou beest taken, God forbid, 

I flie from Thee, as others did : 

But if Thou wilt so honour me, 

As to accept my companie, 

I'le follow Thee, hap, hap what shall, 5 

Both to the Judge, onA Jtidgment-Hall : 

And, if I see Thee posted there, 

To be all-flayd with whipping-cheere 

I'le take my share ; or els, my God, 

Thy stripes I'le kisse, or burn the Hod. ip 



390 Noble Numhrs. 

His Saviours words, going to the Crosse. 

Have, have ye no regard, all ye 
Who passe this way, to pitie me, 
Who am a man of miserie ! 

A man both bruis'd, and broke, and one 

Who suffers not here for mine own, 5 

But for my friends transgression ! 

Ah ! Sions Daughters, do not feare 

The Crosse, the Cords, the Nailes, the Speare, 

The Myrrhe, the Gall, the Vineger : 

For Christ, your loving Saviour, hath 10 

Drunk up the wine of Gods fierce wrath ; 
Onely, there's left a little froth, 

Lesse for to tast, then for to shew, 

What bitter cups had been your due. 

Had He not drank them up ioxyou. 15 



His Anthem, to Christ on the Crosse. 

When I behold Thee, almost slain, 

With one, and all parts, full of pain : 

When I Thy gentle Heart do see 

Pierc't through, and dropping bloud, for me, 

I'le caill, and cry out, Thanks to Thee. 

Vers. But yet it wounds my soule, to think, 

That for my sin. Thou, Thou must drink, 
Even Thou alone, the bitter cup 
Oifurie, and of vengeance up. 

Chor. Lord, I'le not see Thee to drink all 
The Vineger, the Myrrhe, the Gall: 

Ver. Chor. But I will sip a little wine ; 

Which done, Lord say, The rest is mine. 



Noble Numbers. 391 



This Crosse- Tree here 

Doth Jesus beare. 
Who sweet'ned first, 
Tfie Death accurst. 
Here all things ready are, make ha,s.t, make hast away ; 5 
For, long this work wil be, & very short this Day. 
Why then, go on to act : Here's wonders to be done, 
Before the last least sand of Thy ninth hpure be run ; 
Or e're dark Clouds do dull, or dead the Mid-dayes Sun. 

Act when Thou wilt, 10 

Bloud will be spilt; 

Pure Balm, that shall 

Bring Health ,to All. 

Why then, Begin 

To powre first in ij 

Some Drops of Wine, 

In stead of Brinp, 

To search the Wound, 

So long upsound : 

And, when that's done, 20 

Let Oyle, next, run, 

To cure the Sore 

Sinne made before. 

And O ! Deare Christ, 

E'en as Thou di'st, 35 

Look down, and see 

Us weepe fpr Thee, 

And tho (Love knows) 

Thy dreadfull Woes 

Wee cannot ease; 30 

Yet doe Thou please. 

Who Mercie art, 

T'accept each Hear,t, 

That gladly would 

Helpe, if it could. 35 

Meane while, let mee, 

Beneath this Tree, 

This Honour have, 

To make rny grave. 



392 Noble Numbers. 



'To his Saviours Sepukher : his Devotion. 

Haile holy, and all-honour'd Tomb, 

By no ill haunted ; here I come, 

With shoes put off, to tread thy Roome. 

I'le not prophane, by soile of sin, 

Thy Doore, as I do enter in : 5 

For I have washt both hand and heart, 

This, that, and ev'ry other part ; 

So that I dare, with farre lesse feare, 

Then full affection, enter here. 

Thus, thus I come to kisse Thy Stone 10 

With a warm lip, and solemne one : 

And as I kisse, I'le here and there 

Dresse Thee with flowrie Diaper. 

How sweet this place is ! as from hence 

Flow'd all Panchaids Frankincense ; 15 

Or rich Arabia did commix, 

Here, all her rare Aromaticks. 

Let me live ever here, and stir 

No one step from this Sepukher. 

Ravisht I am ! and down I lie, 20 

Confus'd, in this brave Extasie. 

Here let me rest ; and let me have 

This for my Heaven, that was Thy Grave : 

And, coveting no higher sphere, 

I'le my Eternitie spend here. 25 



His Offerings with the rest, at the Sepukher. 

To joyn with them, who here confer 
Gifts to my Saviours Sepukher j 
Devotion bids me hither bring 
Somwhat for my Thank-Offering. 
Loe ! Thus I give a Virgin-Flower, 
To dresse my Maiden-Saviour. 



Noble Numbers. 393 



His coming to the Sepulcher. 

Hence they have born my Lord : Behold ! the Stone 
Is rowl'd away ; and my sweet Saviour's gone ! 
Tell me, white Angell ; what is now become 
Of Him, we lately seal'd up in this Tombe ? 
Is He, from hence^ gone to the shades beneath, 
To vanquish Hell, as here He conquer'd Death ? 
If so ; I'le thither follow, without feare ; 
And live in Hell, if that my Christ stayes there. 



Of all the good things whatsoe're we do, 
God is the APXH, and the TEAOS too. 



ADDITIONAL POEMS 

NOT INCLUDED IN IIESPERWES OR NOBLE 
NUMBERS. 

My Hericke his daughter's Dowrye?- 

Ere I goe hence and bee noe more 

Seene to the world, He giue the skore 

I owe vnto A female Child, 

And that is this, A verse Instylde 

My daughters Douarye ; haueing which 5 

I'le leaue thee then Compleatly riche. 

Insteade of gould Fearle Rubies Bonds 

Longe forfaite pawned diamonds 

Or Antique pledges. House or iande, 

I give thee this that shall withstande 10 

The blow of Ruine and of Chance. 

Theis hurte not thyne Inheritance, 

For 'tis Fee simple, and noe rent 

Thou Fortune ow'st for tenement. 

Howeuer after tymes will praise, 15 

This Portion my Prophetique Bayes 

Cannot deliuer vpp to'th rust, 

Yett I keepe peacefull in my dust. 

As for thy birth, and better seeds 

(Those w^h must growe to Vertuous deeds) 30 

Thou didst deriue from that old stem 

{Loue and Mercie, cherrish them), 

W^h like a Vestall Vergine ply 

With holye fier least that itt dye. 

Growe vpp w'h Mylder Lawes to knowe 25 

Att what tyme to say I, or noe, 

Lett Manners teach the(e) whear to bee 

More Comely flowing : where les free. 

Theis bringe thy husband, like to those 

Old Coyne's and Meddalls, wee expose 30 

- Ashmole MS. 38, No, 112 lo wth stande MS, 21 stem] steem MS. 



Additional Poems. 395 

To'th shew, but Neuer part w'h ; next 

As In a more Conspicuous Text 

(Thy fore-head) lett therin bee sign'd 

The Mayden Candour of thy Mynde : 

And vnder it two Chast borne spyes 3S 

To barr out bolde Adulteryes, 

For through these Optickes, fly the dartes 

Of Lust, which setts on fier our hartes. 

On eyther side of theis, quicke Eares 

Ther must bee plac'd, for season'd feares 40 

W<=h sweeten Loue, yett ne're come nighe 

The Plague of wilder Jelousie. 

Then lett each Cheeke of thyne intice 

His soule as to a bedd of spice 

Wheare bee may roule, and loose his sence 45 

As in a bedd of Frankensence. 

A Lipp Inkyndled w^h that Coale 

W^h w<=h Loue Chafes and warmes the soule 

Bringe to hym next, and in it shew 

Loues Cherries from such fyers growe 50 

And haue their haruest, w^h must stand 

The Gathering of the Lipp : not hand. 

Then vnto theis, bee itt thy care 

To cloath thy words in gentle Ayre 

That smooth as Oyle, sweet softe and Cleane 55 

As is the childish Bloome of Beane, 

Thay may fall downe and stroake as the 

Beames of the sunn, the peacefuU sea. 

White handes as smooth, as Mercies, bring 

Hym for his better Cherrishing 60 

That when thou doest bis necke Insnare, 

Or w*h thy wrist or flattering Hayre, 

Hee may (a prisoner) ther discrye 

Bondage more Loued then Lybertye. 

A Nature, soe well form'd, soe wrought 65 

To[o] Calme A tempest, lett bee brought 

Wth thee ; that should hee but Inclyne 

To Roughnes, Claspe hym lyke a Vine, 

Or lyke as woole meetes Steele, giue way 

Vnto the passion, not to stay ; 70 

58-9 sea. White P. Simpson conj. : sea Wh MS. 



396 



Additional Poems. 



Wrath yf resisted ouer boyles, 

Iff not, it dyes, or eles recoyles. 

And Lastly, see thou bring to hym 

Somewhat peculiar to each lymm. 

And I charge thee to bee knowne 75 

By n' other Face, but by thyne owne, 

Lett itt (in Loues name) bee keept sleeke 

Yett to bee found when hee shall seeke 

It, and not Instead of Saint 

Giue vpp his worth : to the painte; 80 

For (trust me Girle) shee ouer-does 

Who by a double Proxie woes. 

But Least I should forgett his bedd 

Bee sure thou bringe A Mayden head, 

That is A Margarite, w^h Lost 85 

Thou bring'st vnto his bedd A frost 

Or A colde Poyson, which his blood 

Benummes like the forgettfull floode. 

Now for some Jewells to supplye 

The Wante of Fare rings brauerye, 90 

For puplike Eyes, take onlye theis 

Ne're trauylde for beyonde the seas, 

Theyre Nobly-home-bread, yett haue price 

Beyound the fare-fetch Marchandize. 

Obedience, Wise- Distrust, Peace, shy 95 

Distance and sweet Vrbanitie, 

Safe Modestie, Lou'd Patience, Feare 

Of offending. Temperance, Deare 

Constancie, Bashfullnes, and all 

The Virtues Lesse, or Cardinal!, 100 

Take w^h my blessinge ; and goe forth 

Injewelld w*^h thy Natiue worthe. 

And now yf ther A man bee founde 

That Lookes for such prepared grownd, 

Lett hym but w% indifferent skill 105 

Soe good a soile bee-stocke and till, 

Hee may ere longe haue such a wyfe 

Nourish in's breast, a Tree of Life. 

Finis Rob' Hericke. 

95 shy] In the MS. originally ' shee ' ; then only partially corrected to shey 
97 feare Of offending written in the ordinary script, which would be represented 
in rom'i.n type by the printer 1 03 Injewelld] In Jewelld, MS. 



Additional Poems. 397 



M" Robert Hericke his farwell vnto Poetrie.^ 

I haue behelde two louers in a night 

(Hatch't o're with Moone-shine, from their stolen delight) 

When this to that, and that, to this, had giuen 

A kisse to such a Jewell of the heauen : 

Or while that each from other's breath did drincke 6 

Healthes to the Rose, the Violet, or Pinke, 

Call'd on the suddayne by the Jealouse Mother, 

Some strickter Mi'>a- or suspitious other 

Vrging diuorcement (worse then death to theis) 

By the soone gingling of some sleepy keyes, to 

Parte w^h a hastye kisse ; and in that shew 

How stay thay would, yet forc't thay are to goe. 

Euen such are wee ; and in our parting, doe 

Noe otherwise then as those former two 

Natures, like ours, wee who haue spent our tyme 15 

Both from the Morning to the Euening Chyme ; 

Nay tell the Bell-man of the Night had tould 

Past Noone of night, yett weare the bowers not old 

Nor duU'd w*h Iron sleeps ; but haue out-worne 

The fresh and fayrest flourish of the Morne 30 

W% Flame, and Rapture ; drincking to the odd 

Number of Nyne, w^h makes vs full w^h God, 

And In that Misticke frenzie, wee haue hurl'de 

(As w^h a Tempeste) Nature through the worlde 

And In a Whirl- wynd twirld her home, agast 25 

Att that w^h in her extasie had past ; 

Thus Crownd with Rose Budds, Sacke, thou mad'st mee flye 

Like fier-drakes, yett did'st mee no harme therby. 

O thou Allmightye Nature, who did'st glue 

True heate, whearw% humanitie doth Hue 3° 

Beyond its stinted Circle ; glueing foode 

(White Fame) and Resurrection to the Good, 

Soaring them vpp, boue Ruyne, till the doome 

(The generall Aprill of the worlde) dothe Come, 

1 Ashmole MS. 38, No. 121. 21 odd] ode il/i". 22 Nyne] -wyne MS: 
2 white Hazlitt : while MS. 33 Soaring] Shoring Pollard 



398 



Additional Poems. 



That makes all sequall. Manye thowsands should 35 

(Wert not for thee) haue Crumbled Into Mould, 

And w'h thayr Ceareclothes rotted, not to shew 

Whether the world such Sperritts had or noe, 

Whearas by thee, those, and A Million since 

Nor Fate, nor Enuye, cann theyr Fames Conuince, 40 

Homer, Musceus, Ouid, Maro, more 

Of those god-full prophetts longe before 

Holde their Eternall fiers ; and ours of Late 

(Thy Mercie helping) shall resist stronge fate 

Nor stoope to'th Center, but suruiue as Longe 45 

As Fame or Rumour, hath or Trumpe or Tongue. 

But vnto mee, bee onlye hoarse, since now 

(Heauen and my soule beare Record of my Vowe) 

I, my desires screw from thee, and directe 

Them and my thoughts to that sublim'd respecte 50 

And Conscience vnto Preist-hood, tis not Need 

(The skarcrow vnto Mankinde) that doth breed 

Wiser Concliisions in mee, since I ktiowe 

I've more to beare my Chardge, then way to goe, 

Or had I not, I'de stopp the spreading itch 55 

Off craueing more : soe In Conceipt bee ritch. 

But tis the god of Nature, who Intends 

And shaps my Function, for more glorious ends : 

Guesse, soe departe ; yett stay A while to[oJ see 

The Lines of Sorrowe, that lye drawne in mee 60 

In speach, in Picture ; noe otherwise then when 

(Judgment and Death, denounc'd gainst Guilty rnen) 

Each takes A weeping farwell, rackt in mynde 

Wth Joyes before, and Pleasures left behind : 

Shakeing the head, whilst each, to each dothe mourne, 65 

W'h thought thay goe, whence thay must ner returne. 

Soe w*h like lookes, as once the Ministrell 

Cast, leading his Euredice through hell, 

I stricke thy loues, and greedyly persue 

Thee, w'h myne Eyes, or in, or out, of View. 70 

Soe look't the Grecian Cratour when sent 

Froms Natiue Cuntrye, into Banishm', 

Throwing his eye balls backward, to suruaye 

43 their] there MS. 54 I've] I'atn MS. 59 Hazliit substitutes Kisse 

for Guesse, and later editors have accepted this judicious emendcUion 



Additional Poems. 3 99 

The smoake of his beloued Attica, 

Soe TuUye look't, when from the Brest's of Rome 75 

The sad soule went, not with his Loue, but doome ; 
Shooting his Eye-darts 'gainst it, to surprise 
It, or to drawe the Cittie to his Eyes. 
Such is my parting w'h thee ; and to proue 
Ther was not Varnish (only) in my loue 80 

But substance, to ! receaue this Pearlye Teare 
Frozen w^h Greife ; and place it in thyne eare, 
Then Parte in name of peace ; & softely on 
W^h Numerous feete to Hoofy Helicon, 
And when thou art vppon that forked Hill 85 

Amongest the thrice-three-sacred Virgins, fill 
A full brimm'd bowle of Furye and of rage 
And quafe it to the Prophets of our Age ; 
When drunck w'h Rapture ; Curse the blind & lame 
Base Ballad-mongers, who vsurpe thy name 90 

And fowle thy Altar, Charme some Into froggs, 
Some to bee Ratts, and others to bee hoggs : 
Into the Loathsoms(t) shapps, thou canst deuise 
To make Fools hate them, onlye by disguise ; 
Thus w'h a kisse of warmth, and loue, I parte 95 

Not soe, but that some Relique In my Harte 
Shall stand for euer, though I doe addresse 
Cheifelye my selfe to what I must proffess : 
Knowe yet, (rare soule,) when my diuiner Muse 
Shall want a Iland-mayde, (as she ofte will vse) 100 

Bee readye, thou In mee, to wayte vppon her 
Thoughe as a seruant, yet a Mayde of Honor. 
The Crowne of dutye is our dutye ; well 
Doing's, the Fruite of Doinge well, Farwell. 

Finis Mr Rob* Herricke 



86 thrice-three-sacred] thrice, three, sacred MS. 



400 Additional Poems. 

A CharroU p'^sented to D^ Williams Bp. of Lincolne 
as a Newyears guift^ 

Fly hence Pale Care, noe more remember 
Past Sorrowes with the fled December 
But let each p''sant Cheeke appe 
Smooth as the Childhood of the yeare 

And sing a Caroll here. j 

T'was braue, t'was braue could we comand y^ hand 
Of Youthe(s) swift watch to stand 
As yow haue done yo'' day, 
Then should we not decay, 

But all we wither and our Light lo 

Is spilt in eiMasting night. 
When as your Sight 

Shewes like the Heavens aboue y^ Moone, 
Like an Eternall Noone 
That sees noe setting Sunn. 15 

Keepe vp those flames, & though you shroud 

A while yo"^ forehead in a Cloude 

Doe it like the Sun to write 

I'th ayre, a greater Text of light. 

Welcome to all o'' vowes 20 

And since you pay 

To vs the day 

Soe longe desir'd 

See we haue fyr'd 

Our holy Spicknard, & ther's none 25 

But brings his stick of Cynamon, 

His eager Eye, or Smoother Smyle, 

And lays it gently on y® Pyle, 

Which thus enkindled we invoke 

Yo' name amidst the sacred smoke. 30 

Chorus. Come then greate Lord 
And see o'' Alter burne 
With loue of yo'' Returne 
And not a man here but consumes 
His soule to glad you in perfumes. 35 

Rob: Herrick. 

' Ashmole MS. 36-7, fol. 298 



Additional Poems. 40 1 



His Mistns to him at his farwell.^ 

You may vow He not forgett 

To pay the debt, 
Which to thy Memorie stands as due 

As faith can seale It you ; 
Take then tribute of my teares, 5 

So long as I haue feares 

To prompt mee, I shall euer 
Languish and looke but thy returne see neuer. 

Oh then to lessen my dispaire 

Print thy lips into the ayre, lo 

So by this 
Meanes I may kisse thy kisse, 

When as some kinde 
Winde 
Shall hither waft it, and in leiu 15 

My lipps shall send a 1000 back to you. 

Ro: herrick. 



Vpon parting.^ 

Goe hence away, and in thy parting know 

Tis not my voice, but heauens, that bidds thee goe ; 

Spring hence thy faith, nor thinke it ill desert 

I finde in thee, that makes me thus to part. 

But voice of fame, and voice of heauen haue thunderd 

We both were lost, if both of us not sunderd ; 

Fould now thine armes, and in thy last looke reare 

One sighe of loue, and coole it with a teare ; 

Since part we must Let's kissej that done retire 

With as cold frost, as erst we mett with fire ; 

With such white vowes as fate can nere dissever 

But truth knitt fast ; and so farewell for euer. 



R: Herrick: 



1 Brit. Museum, Add. MS. 11811, fol. 37. 
^ Harleian MS. 6917, fol. 82. 



402 Additional Poems. 



Upon Master Fletchers incomparable Playes.^ 

Apollo sings, his harpe resounds ; give roome, 

For now behold the golden Pompe is come, 

Thy Pompe of Playes which thousands come to see, 

With admiration both of them and thee, 

O Volume worthy leafe, by leafe and cover S 

To be with juice of Cedar washt all over ; 

Here's words with lines, and lines with Scenes consent, 

To raise an Act to full astonishment ; 

Here melting numbers, words of power to move 

Young men to swoone, and Maides to dye for love. lo 

Love lyes a bleeding here, Evadne there 

Swells with brave rage, yet comely every where. 

Here's a mad lover, there that high designe 

Of King and no King (and the rare Plott thine) 

So that when 'ere we circumvolve our Eyes, 1 5 

Such rich, such fresh, such sweet varietyes, 

Ravish our spirits, that entranc't wee see 

None writes lov's passion in the world, like Thee. 

Rob. Herrick. 



^ From Beaumont and Fletcher's 'Comedies and Tragedies'', 1647; also 
from Francis Beaumont's Poems, 1653 



Additional Poems. 403 



THE NEW CHARON/ 

upon the Death of Henry hard Hastings. 

The Musical part being set by M. Henry Lawes. 

The Speakers, 
Charon and Eucosmeia. 

Eue. Charon, O Charon, draw thy Boat to th' Shore, 

And to thy many, take in one soul more. 
Cha. Who calls ? who calls ? Euc. One overwhelm 'd with ruth ; 

Have pity either on my tears or Youth, 

And take me in, who am in deep Distress ; 5 

But first cast off thy wonted Churlishness. 
Cha. I will be gentle as that Air which yeelds 

A breath of balm along the Elizean fields. 

Speak, what art thou ? Euc. One, once that had a lover. 

Then which, thy self ne'er wafted sweeter over. i o 

He was Cha. Say what. Euc. Ay me, my woes are deep. 

Cha. Prethee relate, while I give ear and weep. 
Euc. He was an Hastings ; and that one Name has 

In it all good, that is, and ever was. 

He was my Life, my Love, my Joy ; but di'd ij 

Some hours before I should have been his Bride. 
Chorus. Thus, thus the gods celestial still decree, 

For Humane Joy, Contingent Misery. 
Euc. The hallowed Tapers all prepared were. 

And Hymen call'd to bless the Rites. Cha. Stop there, ao 
Euc. Great are my woes. Cha. And great must that Grief be, 

That makes grim Charon thus to pity thee. 

But now come in. Euc. More let me yet relate. 
Cha. I cannot stay ; more souls for waftage wait. 

And I must hence. Euc. Yet let me thus much know, 25 

Departing hence, where Good and Bad souls go. 

' From ^LachrymiB Musarum. The Tears of the Mnses : exprest in Elegies 
written by divers persons of Nobility and Worth, upon the death of the most 
hopefuU Henry, Lord Hastings,' &c. Collected and set forth by R[ichardl 
B[rome]. Lend. 1649, 8vo, pp. 38-9. 



404 Additional Poems. 

Cha. Those souls which ne'er were drencht in pleasures stream, 

The Fields of Fluio are reserv'd for them ; 

Where, drest with garlands, there they walk the ground, 

Whose blessfed Youth with endless flow'rs is crown'd. 30 

But such as have been drown'd in this wilde sea, 

For those is kept the Gulf of Hecatfe ; 

Where, with their own contagion they are fed ; 

And there do punish, and are punishfed. 

This known, the rest of thy sad story tell, 35 

When on the Flood that nine times circles Hell. 
Chorus. We sail along, to visit mortals never ; 

But there to live, where Love shall last for ever. 

Rob. Herricke. 



Vpon a Cherrystone sent to the tip of the lady 
Jemonia Walgraves eare} 

Lady I intreate yow weare 

This little pendant on your eare, 

Tis not Jewell of great prize 

Or in respect of Merchandize, 

But deepe mistery, not the stone 5 

Gives it estimation. 

Take it then and in a viewe 

See th' Epitomfe of yow, 

For what life and death confines 

Looks through the passage of theis lines 10 

Whose incarvem*^ doe descrye 

A scripture how yow liue and dye. 

Read it then before your lipp 

Comends it to your eares soft tipp 

And the while yow doe surveye 15 

This Janus looking double waye 

With a teare yow may compare 

To that yow must be ; what yow are. 

Know time past this cherrystone 

Had a sweet complexion 20 

Skynne and colour, flesh and blood, 

Daintye tast for ladyes food. 

' Rawlinson MS. F. poet. 160, fol. 28. 



Additional Poems. 405 

All's now fledd saue this alone 

Poor relique of the beawty, bone, 

And that soe little we despaire 25 

It ever dangling smil'd i' th' aire. 

Soe must that faire face of yours 

(As this looking-glasse assures) 

Faile and scarce leaue to be showne 

There ever lived such a one. 30 

And when an other age shall bring 

Your leane scalp to sensuring 

Though the Sextons truly sweare 

Here Jemmonia's titles were 

In this rag'd Escutcheon 35 

Most maye smile, beleiue will none, 

Or their thought of faith may growe 

But to this, to think 'twas soe. 

This lesson you must pearse to' th' truth 

And know (faire mistris) of yo'' youth 40 

Death with it still walkes along 

From Mattins to the Euensong, 

From the Pickaxe to the spade. 

To the tombe wher't must be layd. 

Whether in the morne or noone 45 

Of yo'' beawty death comes soone 

And though his visage hung i' th' eare 

Doth not to the sight appeare 

At each warning bees as much 

Know, to' th' hearing as the touch. 50 

Place then this mirror whose briske hue 



Of lines and colo" make them scorne 



J 7 their") there MS 47 though] through MS 

\i-2 The defective text can be restored from the British Museum MSS. 
Additional MS. 309S2, fol. 66, reads : 

Placed then his mirrour to y" veiw 

Of those virgins whose brisky hew 

Whose limbs and coulour . . . 
Sloane MS. 1792, fol. 20 (with which Shane MS. 1^46, fol. 62 b, agrees) 
reads : 

Place then the mirronr of this view 

To those virgins, whose briske hew 

Of lims and colours . . . 



406 Additional Poems, 



This livery w"'' the *greeke hath worne 
Let them read this booke and learne 55 

Their ayry coulors to discerne, 
Twixt this and them this Gorgon showne 
Turnes the beholders into stone. 
I Finis I 

R: Hericke 



[Epitaph on the Tomb of Sir Edward Giles and his 
wife in the South Aisle of Dean Prior Church.] 

No trust to Metals nor to Marbles, when 

These have their Fate, and wear away as Men ; 

Times, Titles, Trophies, may be lost and Spent ; 

But Vertue Rears the eternal Monument. 

What more than these can Tombs or Tomb-stones Pay ? 

But here's the Sun-set of a Tedious day : 

These Two asleep are : I'll but be Vndrest 

And so to Bed : Pray wish us all Good Rest. 

54 *greeke] Tfie asterisk marks an intended note ■which was not supplied 



INDEX OF TITLES. 



Abdie, Lady, To, 145. 

Abels Bloud, 377, 378. 

Abstinence, 324. 

Accusation, 192. 

Admonition, The, 130. 

Adversity, 231, 235. 

Advice the best actor, 311. 

Affliction, 331. 

After Autumne, Winter, 314. 

Age, His, dedicated to his peculiar 
friend, M. John Wickes, under 
the name of Posthumus, 132. 

Age unfit for Love, 270. 

Alablaster, Doctor, To, 251. 

All things decay and die, 23. 

All things run well for the Righ- 
teous, 339. 

Almes, 170, 346, 381. 

Amber Bead, The, 263. 

Ambition, 21, 225. 

Anacreontike, 195, 301. 

Anacrontick Verse, 302. 

An end decreed, 220. 

Angells, 369. 

Anger, 255. 

Answer to a friend, His, 305. 

Answer to a Question, His, 12. 

Anthea, To, 11, 20, 24, 231, 256, 

270. 313- 

lying in bed, 34. 

who may command him any 
thing, 108. 
Anthea's Retractation, 304. 
Apollo, A Canticle to, 151. 

To, 122, 274. 
Apparition of his Mistresse calling 

him to Elizium, 202. 
Apron of Flowers, The, 245. 
Armilet, The, 18. 
A.rt above Nature, 200. 
Asse, The, 374. 
A will to be working, 346. 

Bacchanalian Verse, 224, 299. 
Bacchus, A Hymne to, 122, 254. 
To, IS7- 



Bad may be better, 307. 
Bad Princes pill their People, 266. 
Bad wages for good service, 286. 
Bag of the Bee, The, 31. 
Baldwin, Prudence, Upon her 

sicknesse, 122. 
Baptisme, 386. 

Barly-break : or. Last in Hell, 34. 
Bartly, M. Arthur, To his worthy 

friend, 228. 
Bashfulnesse, 121. 
Bastards, 305. 
Beanes, Parson, Upon, 162. 
Beauty, 268. 
Bed-man, or Grave-maker, The, 

270. 
Beggar to Mab, the Fairie Queen, 

220. 
Beggars, 373. 
Begger, The, 305. 
Beginning, difficult, 285. 
Beginnings and Endings, 377. 
Being once blind, his request to 

Biancha, 33. 
Bell-man, The, 121, 362. 
Berkley, Sir John, Governour of 

Exeter, To, 246. 
Best to be merry, 96. 
Beucolick, A, or discourse of 

Neatherds, 239. 
Biancha, To, 33, 300. 

to blesse him, 279. 
Biting of Beggars, 235. 
Blame, 283. 

Blame the reward of Princes, 255. 
Bleeding hand, The : or. The 

sprig of Eglantine given to a 

maid, 88. 
Blossoms, To, 175. 
Body, The, 272. 
Bondman, The, 287. 
Book, The Argument of his, 5. 
Booke, To his, 6, 7, 76, 98, 154, 

209, 268, 273, 279, 293, 306, 325. 
Bracelet of Pearle, The ; To Silvia, 

236. 



4o8 



Index of Titles. 



Bradshawe, Mistresse Katherine, 
To, the lovely, that crowned 
him with Laurel, 94. 

Bribes and Gifts get all, 123. 

Bride-Cake, The, 261. 

Bridegroom, The stay of the, 

370. 
Broken Christall, The, 185. 
Bubble, The, 87. 
Buckingham, George, Duke, Mar- 

quesse, and Earle of. To the 

High and Noble Prince, 99. 
Bucolick betwixt Two : Lacon 

and Thyrsis, 298. 
Buriall, 261. 
By use comes easinesse, 241 . 

Calling, and correcting, 332. 
Candlemasse day. The Ceremonies 
for, 278. 
Upon, 278. 
Candlemasse Eve, Ceremonies for, 
277. 
Ceremony upon, 297. 
Captiv'd Bee: or, The little 

Filcher, 71. 
Care a good keeper, 300. 
Carkanet, The, 14. 
Carlile, Countesse of, Upon a 
black Twist, rounding the Arme 
of the, 65. 
Carnations, To, 83. 
Casualties, 123. 
Caution, A, 183. 
Caution in Councell, 311. 
Cavalier, His, 31. 
Cedars, To, 63. 
Change common to all, 205 . 
Change gives content, 189. 
Change, His, 305. 
Charles, Prince of Wales : 

A Pastorall upon the birth of, 

86. 
To the most illustrious, and 

most hopefuU Prince, 3. 
Upon his coming to Exeter, To, 
249. 
Charme, A, or an allay for Love, 
207. 
For Stables, 277. 
Charmes, 277, 315, 316. 
Charon and Phylomel, 243. 



CharroU presented to Dr. Williams, 
Bp. of Lincolne, as a Newyears 
guift, 400. 
Cheerfulnesse in Charitie : or. 

The sweet sacrifice, 22. 
Cherrie-ripe, 19. 
Cherry-blossomes, To, 73. 
Cherry-pit, 18. 
Chewing the Cud, The, 387. 
Child, Upon a, 70, 221. 
Child that dyed. Upon a, 123. 
Choose for the best, 287. 
Chop-Cherry, 142. 
Christ, To, 367, 380. 
Coming to, 368. 
Going to His Crosse, 388. 
Going to the Crosse, His words 

to, 389. 
On the Crosse, His Anthem to, 
390. 
Christs Action, 379. 
Birth, 374. 
Incarnation, 380. 
part, 346. 
sadnesse, 371. 
suffering, 378. 
twofold coming, 387. 
words on the Crosse, My God, 
My God, 372. 
Christian Militant, The, 128. 
Christmas CaroU, sung to the 
King in the Presence at White- 
Hall, 354. 
Christmasse, Ceremonies for, 258. 
Christmasse-Eve, another Cere- 
monie, 258. 
Another to the Maids, 258. 
Another, 259. 
Clemency, 132. 
Clemency in Kings, 25 5. 
Closet-Gods, To his, 223. 
Clothes, are conspirators, 286. 
do but cheat and cousen us, 154. 
for Continuance, 383. 
Cloud, The, 263. 
Clouds, 372. 
Clunn, Upon, 288. 
Coblers Catch, The, 216. 
Cock-crow, 339. 
Coheires, 385. 
Comfort, His, 313. 
Comfort in Calamity, 312. 



Index of Titles. 



409 



Comfort to a Lady upon the 

Death of her Husband, 105. 
Comfort to a youth that had lost 

his Love, 307. 
Comforts in contentions, 372. 
Comforts in Crosses, 304. 
Comming of good luck, The, 100. 
Confession, 329, 385. 
Conformitie, 25. 
Conformity is Comely, 311. 
Confusion of face, 372, 373. 
Conjuration, A : to Electra, 252. 
Connuhii Flores, or the well- wishes 

at Weddings, 217. 
Conscience, To his, 347. 
Consultation, 248. 
Content, not cates, 124. 
Contention, 247. 
Corinna, Changes to, 96. 
Corinna's going a Maying, 68. 
Correction, 368. 
Cotton, Mr. Charles, To his 

honoured and most Ingenious 

friend, 290. 
Counsell, 265. 

Country, His content in the, 197. 
Country life, A : To his brother, 

M. Tho. Herrick, 35. 
Country life. The, 225. 
Courage cool'd, 253. 
Covetous still Captives, The, 210. 
Credit of the Conqueror, The, 197. 
Creed, His, 348. 
Crew, Sir Clipseby, and his Lady : 

A Nuptiall Song, or Epitha- 

lamie on, 112. 
Crew, Sir Clipseby : 

A Hymne to, 160. 

An Ode to, 195. 

To, 180, 214. 
Crew, Lady : 

To the, upon the death of her 
Child, 187. 

Upon the, 297. 
Criticks, To, 33. 
Crofts, Master John, Cup-bearer 

to the King, To his faithfull 

friend, 261. 
Crosse and Pile, 187. 
Crosses, no, 271. 
Crosse-Tree, The, 391. 
Crowd and company, The, 162. 



Cruell Maid, The, 60. 

Cruelties, 232. 

Cruelty, 286. 

Cruelty base in Commanders, 208. 

Crutches, 295. 

Cunctation in Correction, 285. 

Cupid, An Hymne to, 274. 

The Cheat of : or. The ungentle 
guest, 26. 

The wounded, 50. 

To, 324. 

Upon, 18, 64, 96, 288. 
Curse, The, 49. 



Daffadills, To, 125. 

Daisies, To, not to shut so soone, 

163. 
Dangers wait on Kings, 26. 
Daughters Dowrye, His, 394. 
Dean-bourn, a rude River in 

Devon, by which sometimes he 

lived, 29. 
Death ends all woe, 252. 
Death, To, 342. 
Definition of Beauty, The, 34. 
Delay, 246. 

Delaying Bride, The, 269. 
Delight in Disorder, 28. 
Deluge, The, 295. 
Denham, M., To, on his Prospec- 
tive Poem, 230. 
Deniall in women no disheartning 

to men, 231. 
Departure of the good Daemon, 

The, 132. 
Desire, His, 3IX. 
Detracter, To the, 66. 
Devotion makes the Deity, 117. 
Dewes, To, 50. 
Dialogue betwixt himseUe and 

Mistresse Eliza. Wheeler, 316. 
Dialogue betwixt Horace and 

Lydia, A, 70. 
Dianeme, To, 34, 61, 194, 266. 

A Ceremonie in Glocester, 232. 
Diet, 312. 
Difference betwixt Kings and 

Subjects, The, 12. 
Dirge of Jephthahs Daughter, 

The : sung by the Virgins, 349. 



4IO 



Index of Titles. 



Dirge upon the Death of the 

Right Valiant Lord, Bernard 

Stuart, 89. 
Discontents in Devon, 19. 
Discord not disadvantageous, 193. 
Disswasions from Idlenesse, 52. 
Distance betters Dignities, 232. 
Distrust, 67, 325. 
Divination by a Daffadill, 39. 
Doomes-Day, 366. 
Dorchester, Henry, Marquesse of. 

To the most learned, and to the 

right Honourable, 294. 
Dorset, the right Honourable 

Edward, Earle of. To, 185. 
Draw, and Drinke, 266. 
Draw Gloves, 98. 
Dreame, His, 347. 
Dreame, The, 16, 153. 
Dreames, 20. 
Duty to TjTrants, 33. 

Eare-rings, 336. 

Ease, 377. 

Eclogue or Pastorall between 
Endimion Porter and Lycidas 
Herrick, 181. 

Ejaculation to God, His, 334. 

Electra, The Vision to, 20. 

To, 35, 58, 193, 227, 247, 252, 

267, 275. 
Upon, 154. 

Electra's Teares, Upon, 201. 

Empires, 161. 

End, The, 123, 286. 

Entertainment, The : or. Porch- 
verse, at the Marriage of Mr. 
Hen. Northly, and the most 
witty Mrs. Lettice Yard, 124. 

Epitaph : His own, 213. 

On the Tomb of Sir Edward 
Giles and his wife in the 
South Aisle of Dean Prior 
Church, 406. 
Upon a Child, 44. 
Upon a sober Matron, 41. 
Upon a Virgin, 169. 

Epithalamie to Sir Thomas South- 
well and his Ladie, 53. 

Eternitie, 344. 

Eucharist, The, 371. 

Evensong, 128. 



Event of things not in our power, 

120. 
Evill, 357. 
Examples, or like Prince, like 

People, 250. 
Excesse, 323. 
Exeter, Jos., Lo. Bishop of. To, 

64. 
Expences Exhaust, 13. 
Eye, The, 47, 249. 
Eyes before the Eares, The, 280. 
Eyes, The, 118. 

Factions, 275. 
Faire after foule, 286. 
Faire dayes : or, Dawnes deceit- 
full, 8r. 
Faire shewes deceive, 287. 
Fairies, The, 198. 
Fairie Temple, The : or Oberons 

Chappell, 90. 
Faith, 352. 

Faith four-square, 285. 
Falconbirge, M. Tho., To his 

worthy Friend, 179. 
Falconbrige, Mistresse Margaret, 

To his dear Valentine, 259. 
False Mourning, 312. 
Fame, 241. 

Fame makes us forward, 168. 
Fare-well to Sack, His, 45. 
Farwell Frost, or welcome the 

Spring, 221. 
Farwell unto Poetrie, His, 397. 
Fast, The, or Lent, 376. 
Father, To the reverend shade of 

his religious, 28. 
Faunus, Upon, 299. 
Feare, 283. 
Feare gets force, 302. 
Felicitie knowes no Fence, 252. 
Felicity, quick of flight, 161. 
Fever, To the, not to trouble 

Julia, 82. 
Few fortunate, 175. 
Finch, M. EUzabeth, To the most 

comely and proper, 292. 
Finger, Upon the losse of his, 201. 
First worL and then wages, 237. 
Fish, Sir Edward, To his peculiar 

friend, 152. 
Flatterie, 323, 



Index of Titles. 



411 



Fletchers incomparable Playes, 
Upon Master, 402. 

File, Upon a, 184. 

Flowers, To, 138. 

Foolishnesse, 325. 

Fortune, 231, 234, 315. 

Fortune favours, 189. 

Foure things make us happy here, 
42. 

Frankincense, The, 157. 

Free Welcome, 368. 

Fresh Cheese and Cream, 181. 

Friend, To a, 281. 

Friend, To his, on the untuneable 
Times, 84. 

Friend, To his, to avoid conten- 
tion of words, 280. 

Frolick, A, 205. 

Frozen Heart, The, 8. 

Frozen Zone, The : or, Julia 
disdainfull, 40. 

Funerall Rites of the Rose, The, 
233. 

Gain and Gettings, 144. 
Gelli-flowers begotten. On, 74. 
Genius of his house. To the, 241 . 
Gentlenesse, 316. 
Gentlewoman, To a, objecting to 

him his gray haires, 63. 
Gentlewoman, To a, on just deal- 
ing, 137- 
Gentlewoman, Upon a painted, 98. 
Gentlewoman with a sweet Voice, 

Upon a, 96. 
Giles, Sir Edward, and his wife. 

Epitaph to, 406. 
Girles, To his, 322. 
Girles, To his, who would have 

him sportfuU, 321. 
Glorie, 215, 237. 

God, To, 333. 337. 339, 34i. 345. 
346, 347. 358. 361, 367. 371. 
372. 375. 376. 377. 383. 385. 
387. 388. . 

To : An Anthem, sung m the 
Chappell at White-Hall, be- 
fore the King, 332. 

To : his gift, 387. 

To : his good will, 359. 

To : in time of plundering, 366. 

To : on his sicknesse, 351. 



God, To his angrie, 343. 

To his deere, 358. 

To his ever-loving, 342. 

Upon, 330, 332, 352. 
God, and Lord, 369. 

and the King, 345. 

has a twofold part, 333. 

heares us, 371. 

his wish to, 361. 

is One, 333. 

not to be comprehended, 330. 

sparing in scourging, 384. 

the goodnesse of his, 363. 

to be first serv'd, 353. 

To finde, 329. 
Gods Anger, 387. 

Anger without Afiection, 330. 

Blessing, 369. 

Bounty, 348, 368. 

Commands, 387. 

Descent, 385. 

Dwelling, 375. 

Gifts not soone granted, 334. 

Grace, 368. 

Hands, 370. 

Keyes, 380. 

Mercy, 331. 

Mirth, Mans mourning, 345. 

Pardon, 357. 

Part, 331. 

Power, 372, 373. 

Presence, 375, 378, 384. 

Price, and mans price, 379. 
Gods Providence, 333. 

Time must end our trouble, 386. 
Gold and Frankincense, 386. 
Gold, before Goodnesse, 129. 
Good, and bad, 373. 
Good Christians, 360. 
Good death. A, 314. 
Good Friday : Rex Tragicus, or 

Christ going to His Crosse, 388. 
Good Husband, A, 254. 
Good Luck not lasting, 215. 
Good manners at meat, 303. 
Good men afflicted most, 360. 
Good-night or Blessing, The, 124. 
Good precepts, or counsell, 242. 
Graces, A Hymne to the, 201. 
Graces for Children, 353, 354. 
Grange, His, 303. 
Grange, His, or private wealth, 242. 



412 



Index of Titles. 



Gray haires. Upon his, 192. 
Great grief, great glory, 362. 
Great Maladies, long Medicines, 

305. 
Great Spirits supervive, 197. 
Griefe, 236, 262. 
Grief as, 153. 
Groves, To, 168. 

Hag, The, 222. 

Hall, M. John, Student of Grayes- 

Inne, To his worthy friend, 292. 
Hand and tongue. The, 137. 
Happinesse, 259. 
Happinesse to hospitalitie, or a 

hearty wish to good house- 
keeping, 284. 
Hardning of hearts, 386. 
Harmar, M. Jo., Phisitian to the 

CoUedge of Westminster, To 

his learned friend, 294. 
Haste hurtful!, 262. 
Hastings, Henry, Lord, Upon the 

Death of, 403. 
Head-ake, The, 207. 
Heale, Sir Thomas, To his Honour' d 

friend, 273. 
Health, 232. 
Heart, The, 336. 
Heaven, 359, 360, 372, 380. 
Hell, 362. 
Hell fire, 377, 381. 
Herrick, Mistresse Bridget, Upon 

his kinswoman, 200. 
Herrick, Mistresse Elizabeth : 

Upon his kinswoman, 146. 

Upon his Sister-in-Law, 24. 
Herrick, M. Mercie, To my dearest 

Sister, 263. 
Herrick, Nicolas, To his Brother, 

322. 
Herrick, Robert : 

Upon himselfe, 17, 60, 65, 97, 
116, 122, 131, 143, 155, 170, 
181, 186, 189, 198, 208, 225, 
271, 283, 291, 319, 320, 322, 
325. 326. 

Upon himselfe being buried, 
197. 

Upon his departure hence, 176. 

Upon his eye-sight failing him, 
179. 



Herrick, Mistresse Susanna : 

To his Kinswoman, 191. 

To his Sister in Law, 296. 
Herrick, M. Tho., To his Idnsman, 

who desired to be in his Book, 

297. See also Country life. 
Herrick, Master William, To his 

dying Brother, 72. 
Herrick's Mistris to him at his 

farwell, 401. 
Hoarse Singer, Upon a, 152. 
Hock-Cart, The, or Harvest Home, 

100. 
Honours are hindrances, 345. 
Hony-combe, The, 281. 
Hope heartens, 42. 
Hope or sheat- Anchor, His, 312. 
Hope well and Have well : or, 

Faire after Foule weather, 186. 
Hopton, Lord, To the, on his fight 

in Cornwall, 303. 
Houre-glasse, The, 45. 
Houshold gods, To his, no. 
How he would drinke his Wine, 

185. 
How his soule came ensnared, 275. 
How Lillies came white, 74. 
How Marigolds come yellow, 185. 
How Pansies or Heart-ease came 

first, 152. 
How Primroses came green, 64. 
How Roses came red, 105, 237. 
How Springs came first, 178. 
How the Wall-flower came first, 

and why so called, 15. 
How Violets came blew, 105. 
Humility, 352. 
Hunger, 286. 

I call and I call, in. 
Ill Government, 193. 
lU Reader, To my, 138. 
Impossibilities to his friend, 79. 
In the darke none dainty, 206. 
Invitation, The, 257. 
Irene, Upon, 201. 

Jack and Jill, 162. 

Jealousie, To, 169. 

Jelaovah, 372. 

Jimmal Ring, or True-love-knot, 

172. 



Index of Titles. 



413 



Jincks, Master J., To his Friend, 

271. 
Johnson, Ben : 

An Ode for, 282. 

His Prayer to, 209. 

Upon, 150, 282. 
Judgment-Day, The, 369, 383. 
Julia, To, 30, 60, 184, 206, 270, 
292, 296, 317. 

A Ring presented to, 65. 

Art above Nature, 200. 

Her Bed, 139. 

Her Legs, 139. 

His charge to, at his death, 
216. 

His Covenant or Protestation 
to, 320. 

His embalming to, 129. 

His last request to, 321. 

His request to, 21. 

His sailing from, 14. 

In her Dawn, or Day-breake, 
265. 

In the Temple, 167. 

Julia disdainful!, 40. 

On, 180. 

The Bracelet to, 128. 

The Candor of Julia's teeth, 
246. 

The Flaminica Dialis, or Queen- 
Priest, 194. 

The Night-piece, 214. 

The Parliament of Roses to, 8. 

The Sacrifice by way of Dis- 
course betwixt himselfe and 
Julia, 273. 

To Roses in Julia's Bosome, 

317- 
To the Fever, not to trouble 

Julia, 82. 
Upon her Almes, 139. 
Upon her blush, 120. 
Upon her weeping, 246. 
Upon his Julia, 138. 
Upon Julia's haire, bundled up 

in a golden net, 275. 
Upon Julia's haire fill'd with 

Dew, 179. 
Upon Julia's unlacing herself, 

156. 
Upon Julia's washing her self 

in the river, 288. 



Julia (continued) : 

Upon the Nipples of Julia's 
Breast, 162. 

Upon the Roses in Julias 
bosome, 244. 
Julia's Breasts, 96. 

Breath, 69. 

Clothes, 256. 

Churching, or Purification, 279. 

Fall, 13. 

Lips, 271. 

Petticoat, 67. 

Picture, 139. 

Recovery, 7. 

Riband, 40. 

Sweat, 240. 

Voice, 22, 23, 102. 
Juno, An hymne to, 142. 
Just man. A, 151. 

Kellam, M., To, 284. 

Keneday, Mrs. Dorothy, His part- 
ing from, 43. 

King and no King, A 323. 

King and Queene, To the, upon 
their unhappy distances, 26. 

King, To the, 107, 232. 
To cure the Evill, 62. 
Upon his comming with his 

Army into the West, 25. 
Upon his taking of Leicester, 265 . 
Upon his welcome to Hampton- 
Court, 293. 

Kings, 237, 322. 

Kings and Tyrants, 271. 

Kisse, A, 215. 

Kisse, The, 130. 

Kisses, 260. 

Kissing and bussing, 187. 

Kissing Usurie, 30. 

Knowledge, 368. 

Labour, 370. 

Lachrimas or Mirth, His, tum'd to 
mourning, 144. 

Lacon and Thyrsis, 298. 

Lady, On a perfum'd, in. 

Lady, Upon a, that dyed in child- 
bed, and left a daughter behind 
her, 126. 

Lady, Upon a delaying, 137. 

Ladyes, To the, 176. 



414 



Index of Titles. 



Lamp, The, 349. 

Lares, Hymne to the, 230. 

Large Bounds doe but bury us, 

1^5 • 
Lark, To the, 87. 
Larr, A short Hynme to, 129. 

To, 131. 
Larr's portion, or the Poets part, 

152- 
Lasciviousnesse, 368. 
Laugh and lie downe, no. 
Laurels, To, 31. 
Lawes, 210, 311. 
Lawes, M. Henry, the excellent 

Composer of his Lyricks, To, 

269. 
Lawes, M. William, the rare 

Musitian, Upon, 281. 
Lawne, The, 157. 
Laxare fibulam, 237. 
Leanders Obsequies, 42. 
Lee, Mistresse Elizabeth, now 

Lady Tracie, A Nuptiall Verse 

to, 213. 
Lenitie, 262. 

Lent, To keep a true, 381. 
Leprosie in Cloathes, 304. 
Leprosie in houses, 303. 
Letanie to the Holy Spirit, His, 337. 
Leven, 291. 
Liberty, 153. 

Life is the Bodies Light, 204. 
Like loves his like, 312. 
Like Pattern, like People, 211. 
Lillie, Upon one, who marryed 

with a maid call'd Rose, 44. 
Lilly in a Christal, The, 75. 
Lincolne, Bishop of. Upon the 

Imprisonment of, 52. 
Lines have their Linings, and 

Bookes their Buckram, 199. 
Lip-labour, 335. 
Lips Tonguelesse, 82. 
Little and loud, 209. 
Littlenesse no cause of Leannesse, 

172. 
Loading and unloading, 331. 
London, His returne to, 238. 
Long and lazie, 141. 
Long life, 369. 

Long lookt for comes at last, 224. 
Losse from the least, 180. 



Losse, His, 266. 
Lots to be liked, 153. 
Love, 230. 

Against, 40. 

An Hymne to, 289. 

Of, 24, 155, 210, 318. 

On, 100, 274, 319. 

To, 17. 

Upon, 29, 117, 171, 186, 200, 
216, 219, 268, 272. 

Upon, by way of question and 
answer, 302. 

What it is, 13. 
Love dislikes nothing, 248. 
Love is a sirrup, 290. 
Love kill'd by Lack, 32. 
Love lightly pleased, 204. 
Love looks for Love, 247. 
Love me little, love me long, 51. 
Love palpable, 236. 
Love perfumes all parts, 59. 
Lovers how they come and part, 

245. 
Love's play at Push-pin, 17. 
Lowman, Mrs. Bridget, To, 140. 
Lucia, Upon, 209. 

Upon, dabled in the deaw, 243. 
Lyrick for Legacies, 89. 

Mad Maids song. The, 155. 
Maid, To a, 125. 

Upon a, 208, 267, 269. 

Upon a comely, and curious, 201 . 

Upon a maid that dyed the day 
she was marryed, 109. 
Maiden-blush, The, 262. 
Maides, To the, to walke abroad, 

212. 
Maids nay's are nothing, 245. 
Man, Upon, 153. 
Manna, 369. 

Mans dying-place uncertain, 175. 
Mars, A Vow to, 151. 
Martha, Martha, 373. 
Marygolds, To, 194. 
Mattens, or morning Prayer, 127^ 
May-pole, The, 235. 
Meane, The, 262, 311. 
Meane in our Meanes, A, 288. 
Meane things overcome mighty, 

236. 
Meat without mirth, 195. 



Index of Titles. 



415 



Meddowes, To, 109. 

Meddow verse or Aniversary to 

Mistris Bridget Lowman, The, 

140. 
Meditation upon Death, His, 382. 
Men mind no state in sicknesse, 

235- 
Mercy, 370. 
Mercy and Love, 330. 
Merits make the man, 120. 
Minerva, A Vow to, 193. 
Mirth, 331. 

A Lyrick to, 39. 
Miseries, no. 
Mistresse, A Meditation for his, 88. 

His misery in a, 62. 

To his, 32. 

To his Mistresse objecting to 
him neither To3^ng or Talk- 
ing, IS- 
Mistresses, To Ms, 10, 20. 

To his lovely, 219. 

Upon the losse of his, 16. 
Moderation, 256, 311. 
Momus, To, 225. 
Money gets the masterie, 21. 
Money makes the mirth, 243. 
Monies Scripturarum, 371. 
Mora Sponsi, the stay of the 

Bridegroom, 370. 
More modest, more manly, 301. 
More potent, lesse peccant, 109. 
Most Words, lesse Workes, 266. 
Multitude, 283. 
Muse, To his, 5, 28, 211, 294. 
Muses, Hymne to the, 224, 256. 
Muses, The mount of the, 325. 
Musick, To, 67, 103. 

To, to becalme a sweet-sick- 
youth, 99. 

To, to becalme his Fever, 95. 
Mynts, Sir John, To his honoured 

friend, 192. 
Myrrha hard-hearted. To, 47. 

Need, 270. 

Neglect, 97. 

Nephew, To his, to be prosperous 

in his art of Painting, 150. 
Neptune, A short Hymne to, 129. 
Neutrality loathsome, 343. 
Never too late to dye, 224. 



New Charon, The, Upon the Death 
of Henry, Lord Hastings, 403. 

New-yeeres Gift, The, 345, 356, 
366. 

New-yeeres Gift, or Circumcisions 
Song, sung to the King in the 
Presence at White-Hall, 355. 

New-yeares gift sent to Sir 
Simepn Steward, 126. 

Nightingale, and Robin-Red-brest, 
To the. III. 

Night-piece, The, to Julia, 214. 

No action hard to affection, 236. 

No bashfulnesse in begging, 8. 

No coming to God without Christ, 

385- 
No danger to men desperate, 324. 
No despight to the dead, 215. 
No difference i' th' dark, 272. 
No escaping the scourging, 332. 
No Loathsomnesse in love, 1 1 . 
No luck in Love, 206. 
No man without Money, 291. 
No Paines, no Gaines, 248. 
No Shipwrack of Vertue, 23. 
No Spouse but a Sister, 13. 
No time in Eternitie, 382. 
No want where there's little, 33. 
None free from fault, 197. 
None truly happy here, 341. 
Nor buying or selling, 314. 
Norgate, Master Edward, Clark of 

the Signet to His Majesty, To, 

121. 
North and South, 376. 
Not every day fit for Verse, 238. 
Not to covet much where little is 

the charge, 301. 
Not to love, 102. 
Nothing Free-cost, 175. 
Nothing new, 140. 
Number of two, The, 386. 
Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on 

Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady, 

112. 
Nuptiall Verse to Mistresse Eliza- 
beth Lee, 213. 

Obedience, 317. 
Obedience in Subjects, 109. 
Oberons Feast, 119. 
Oberons Palace, 164. 



4i6 



Index of Titles. 



Observation, 161, 374. 

Ode of the Birth of our Saviour, 

An, 335. 
Ode, or Psalme, to God, 353. 
Ode to Master Endymion Porter, 

upon his Brothers death, 72. 
Oenone, To, 167, 259, 267. 
Offering, His, with the rest, at the 

Sepulcher, 392. 
Old Wives Prayer, The, 176. 
Olive Branch, The, 73. 
Once poore, still penurious, 22. 
Once seen, and no more, 230. 
Orpheus, 260. 
Oulsworth, Master Michael, To the 

most accomplisht Gentleman, 

321. 
Our own sinnes unseen, 248. 
Out of Time, out of Tune, 273. 

Paine and pleasure, 384. 
Paine ends in Pleasure, 339. 
Paines without profit, 209. 
Painter, To the, to draw him a 

Picture, 39. 
Painting sometimes permitted,22i. 
Pansies, To, 74. 
Paradise, 373. 
Parasceve, or Preparation, The, 

345- 
Parcae, The, or. Three dainty 

Destinies (The Armilet), 18. 
Parcell-gilt-Poetry,' 302. 
Pardon, 334. 
Pardons, 309. 
Parliament of Roses to Julia, The, 

8. 
Parrie, Sir George, Doctor of the 

Civill Law, To, 315. 
Parsons, Mistresse Dorothy, To, 

184. 
Parsons, Tomasin, On, 297. 
Parting, Upon, 401. 
Parting Verse, The, or charge to 

his supposed Wife when he 

travelled, 172. 
Parting verse [to The meddow 

verse], the feast there ended, 

141. 
Passenger, To the, 264. 
Passion, 161. 
Pastorall sung to the King, 158. 



Pastorall upon the birth of Prince 

Charles, 86. 
Paternall Countrey, To his, 19. 
Patience in Princes, 302. 
Patience, or Comforts in Crosses, 

344- 
Peace not Permanent, 309. 
Pemberton, Sir Lewis, A Pane- 

gerick to, 146. 
Pembroke and Montgomerie, the 

right honourable Philip, To the, 

141. 
Penitence, 262, 378. 
Penitencie, 349. 

Perenna, To, 10, 90, 176, 296, 319. 
Perfume, The, 102. 
Perilla, A sonnet of, 306. 

His Protestation to, 59. 

To, 9. 
Persecutions profitable, 333. 
Persecutions purifie, 334. 
Perseverance, 232. 
Peter-penny, The, 251. 
Petition, His, 337. 
Phillis, To, to love, and live with 

him, 190. 
Physitiau, Upon a, 97. 
Physitians, 223. 
Pillar of Fame, The, 326. 
Pitie to the prostrate, 197. 
Pittie, and punishment, 379. 
Plaudite, The, or end of life, 94. 
Pleasures Pernicious, 319. 
Plots not still prosperous, 323. 
Plunder, The, 172. 
Poet hath lost his pipe. The, 202. 
Poet loves a Mistresse, but not to 

marry, 159. 
Poetrie his Pillar, 85. 
Poetry perpetuates the Poet, 260. 
Poets, 215. 

PoUicie in Princes, 162. 
Pomander Bracelet, The, 14. 
Poore mans part, The, 384. 
Poores Portion, The, 366. 
Porter, Master Endimion : 

An Ode to, upon his Brothers 
death, 72. 

To the Honoured^ 317. 

To the honoured : the Country 
life, 225. 

To the Patron of Poets, 41. 



Index of Titles. 



417 



Porter, Endimion, and Lycidas 
Herrick, An Eclogue or Pastoral 
between, 181. 

Portman, Mistresse, The School 
or Perl of Putney, tne Mistress 
of all singular manners, 318. 

Position in the Hebrew Divinity, 
A, 378. 

Possessions, 237. 

Posting to Printing, 307. 

Pot, Mistresse, To the most ver- 
tuous, who many times enter- 
tained him, 94. 

Potentates, 250. 

Potter, Mistresse Amie, To, 267. 

Potter, Mistresse Grace, To the 
handsome, 3CX). 

Poverty and Riches, 210. 

Poverty the greatest pack, 238. 

Power and Peace, 259. 

Power in the people. The, 139. 

Prat, On Poet, 234. 

Pray and prosper, 143. 

Prayer, 371. 

Prayer for Absolution, His, 329. 

Prayers must have Poise, 332. 

Precepts, 185. 

Predestination, 379. 

Prescience, 380. 

Presence and Absence, 13. 

Present Government grievous, 
285. 

Present, The : or. The Bag of the 
Bee, 100. 

Prevision, or Provision, 109. 

Prew, To his Maid, 151, 257. 

Pride allowable in Poets, 192. 

PrimiticB to Parents, The, 223. 

Primrose, The, 205. 

Primroses fiU'd with morning - 
dew. To, 104. 

Princes and Favourites, 250. 

Privacie, His wish to, 253. 

Prognostick, A, 240. 

Proof to no purpose, 240. 

Psalme or Hymne to the Graces, 
A, 255. 

Purgatory, 263. 

Purposes, 212. 

Putrefaction, 161. 

Queene, To the, 107. 



Raggs, 295. 

Rainbow, The, 140. 

Rainbow, The : or curious Cove- 
nant, 233. 

Rapine brings Ruine, 307. 

Reader, To the generous, 32 

Reader, To the soure, 7. 

Readinesse, 268. 

Recantation, His, 99. 

Recompence, 315, 361. 

Regression spoiles Resolution, 247. 

Repletion, 291. 

Request to the Graces, A, 283. 

Rest, 304. 

Rest Refreshes, 285. 

Resurrection, The, 385. 

Resurrection possible, and prob- 
able, 378. 

Revenge, 285. 

Reverence, 370. 

Reverence to Riches, 117. 

Reward and punishments, 180. 

Rewards, 140. 

Rex Tragicus, 388. 

Riches and Poverty, 346. 

Richmond and Lenox, Lodwick, 
Duke of. To the right gratious 
Prince, 169. 

Right hand. The, 384. 

Roaring, 370. 

Robin Red-brest, To, 19. 

Rock of Rubies, The : and The 
quarrie of Pearls, 25. 

Rod, The, 332. 

Rosarie, The, 17. 

Rose, The, 98, 386. 

Rosemarie branch. The, 228. 

Rosemary and Bales, To, 178. 

Roses, Upon, 26. 

Roses in Julias bosome. Upon the, 
244. 

Rules for our reach, 300. 

Sabbaths, 376. 

Sadnesse of things for Sapho's 

sicknesse, 42. 
Safety on the Shore, 85. 
Safety to look to ones selfe, 84. 
Saint Distaffs day, or the morrow 

after Twelfth day, 308. 
Salutation, 368. 
Sapho, To, 234, 260, 272, 299. 



aE 



4i8 



Index of Titles. 



Sapho, Upon, sweetly playing, and 

sweetly singing, 142. 
Satan, 362. 

Satisfaction for sufferings, 269. 
Sauce for sorrowes, 324. 
Saviour, To his, 344, 347, 389. 

To his sweet, 348. 

To his : The New yeers gift, 
366. 
Saviours Sepulcher, To his : his 

Devotion, 392. 
Saviours Words, going to the 

Crosse, His, 390. 
Scar-fire, The, 21. 
Scarre in a Virgins Face, Upon a, 

178. 
Scriptures, The Mounts of the, 

371- 
Seeke and finde, 304. 
Selden, M. John, To the most 

learned, wise, and Arch-Anti- 
quary, 143. 
Sepulcher, His coming to the, 393. 

His Offering, with the rest, at 
the, 392. 
Shame, no Statist, 180. 
Shapcott, Master Thomas, Lawyer, 

To his peculiar friend, 167. 
Ship-wrack, 209. 
Shooe tying. The, 14. 
Short and long both likes, 162. 
Showre of Blossomes, The, 276. 
Silence, 331. 
Silken Snake, The, 116. 
Silvia, a Mistresse, Upon, 21 

A song upon, 281. 

To, 202, 223, 236, 287. 

To : to wed, 8. 
Sin, 352, 357, 373, 376, 379, 380. 

and Strife, 352. 

seen, 336. 

severely punisht, 371. 
Sincerity, 313. 
Single life most secure, 49. 
Sinners, 378. 

Sins loath' d, and yet lov'd, 352. 
Slavery, 276. 
Smart, 312. 

Smell of the Sacrifice, The, 245. 
Soame, Anne, To the most fair 

and lovely TVIistris, now Lady 

Abdie, 145. 



Soame, Mr. Stephen, To his 

worthy Kinsman, 196. 
Soame, Sir Tho., To his Kinsman, 

174- 
Soame, Sir William, To his 

honoured kinsman, 131. 
Sobriety in Search, 346. 
Society, 268. 
Soft Musick, 12. 
Some comfort in calamity, 50. 
Song, A, 249. 

Song to the Maskers, A, 9. 
Sorrowes, 349. 
Sorrowes succeed, 18. 
Soule, The, 383. 
Southwell, Mistresse Susanna : 

Upon her cheeks, 191. 

Upon her eyes, 191. 

Upon her feet, 192. 
Southwell, Sir Thomas, and his 

Ladie, Epithalamie to, 53. 
Sparrow, Upon the death of his, 

103. . 
Speake in season, 317. 
Spell, The, 253. 
Spinners, To the little, 163. 
Springs and Fountains, To, 156. 
Spur, Upon, 322. 
Staffe and Rod, The, 384. 
Star-Song, The : A CaroU to the 

King; sungat W ite-Hall, 357. 
Steame in Sacrifice, 22. 
S[tone], Mrs. M[ary], Upon his 

Kinswoman, 252. 
Stone, Sir Richard, To his Hon- 
oured Kinsman, 183. 
Stool-ball, 234. 
Strength to support Soveraignty, 

295. 
Stuart, Bernard, Dirge upon the 

Death of the Right Valiant 

Lord, 89. 
Studies to be supported, 309. 
Succession of the foure sweet 

months, The, 23. 
Suffer that thou canst not shift, 

264. 
Sufferance, 308. 
Sufferings, 383. 
Summe, The, and the Satisfaction, 

359- 
Supreme fortune falls soonest, 77. 



Index of Titles. 



419 



Surfeits, 278. 

Suspicion makes secure, 297. 

Suspition upon his over-much 
familiarity with a Gentle- 
woman, 48. 

Sweetnesse in Sacrifice, 22. 

Swetnaham, M. Laurence, To, 
,320. 

Sycamores, To, 157. 

Tapers, 374. 

Teare sent to her from Stanes, 

The, 43. 
Teares, 223, 280, 352, 369. 
Teares, and Laughter, 237. 
Teares are Tongues, 58. 
Temple, The, 90. 
Temporall goods, 377. 
Temptation, 334, 370. 
Temptations, 349, 379. 
Temarie of littles, A, upon a pip- 
kin of Jellie sent to a Lady, 244. 
Thamasis, His teares to, 308-. 
Thanksgiving, 338. 
Thanksgiving to God, for his 

House, 339. 
The bad season makes the Poet 

sad, 211. 
The end of his worke, 325 ; To 

Crowne it, ih. 
The first marrs or makes, 285. 
The last stroke strike sure, 233. 
The more mighty, the more merci- 

fuU, 314. 
The present time best pleaseth, 

286. 
The soul is the salt, 324. 
The will makes the work, or con- 
sent makes the Cure, 312. 
Things mortall still mutable, 309. 
Things of choice, long a comming, 

260. 
This, and the next World, 377. 
Three fatall Sisters, 331. 
Time, Upon, 336. 
Tinker's Song, The, 313. 
To all young men that love, 117. 
To be mierry, 261. 
To enjoy the Time, 171. 
To his Saviour, a Child ; a Present, 

by a child, 344. 
To Uve Freely, 170. 



To live merrily, and to trust to 

Good Verses, 80. 
Tomb-maker, To his, 197. 
Tracie, Upon his Spaniell, 295. 
Tracie, Lady : see Lee. 
Transfiguration, The, 264. 
Treason, 10. 
Troublesome times. Upon the, 

208. 
True Friendship, 202. 
True safety, 240. 
Truth, 280. 

Truth and Errour, 309. 
Truth and Falsehood, 321. 
Tuck, Upon, 234. 
Tulips, To a Bed of, 183. 
Twelfe night, or King and Queene, 

310. 
Twilight, 271, 312. 
Two Things Odious, 10. 
Tythe, The : To the Bride, 205. 

Ultimus Heroum, 294. 

Upon a black Twist, rounding the 

Arme of the Countesse of Carlile, 

65. 
Upon a Cherrystone sent to the 

tip of the lady Jemmonia Wal- 

graves eare, 404. 
Upon a Lady faire, but fruitlesse, 

178. 
Upon an old man a Residenciarie, 

222. 
Upon a young mother of many 

children, 58. 

Valentine, To his, on S. Valentines 

day, 149. 
Venus, A vow to, 306. 

A short hymne to, 137. 
Venus and Cupid, A Hymne to, 

139- 
Verses, 259. 

To his, 215. 

Upon his, 232. 
Vertue, 121. 
Vertue best united, 249. 
Vertue is sensible of suffering, 60. 
Villars, Lady Mary, To the, 

Governesse to the Princesse 

Henretta, 138. 
Vineger, Upon, 294. 



420 



Index of 'Titles. 



Violets, To, 83. 

Virgin, An Epitaph upon a, 169. 

Upon a, 282. 

Upon a Virgin kissing a Rose, 

SI- 
Virgin Mary, The, 374, 375. 
Virgins, To, 120. 

To the, to make much of Time, 
84. 
Vision, The, 51, 306. 
Voice and Violl, The, 323. 
Vulcan, To, 211. 

Wages, 370. 

Wake, The, 250. 

Want, 236, 280. 

Warr, Mr. J., Upon the much 

lamented, 48. 
Warre, 323. 
Wassaile, The, 177. 
Watch, The, 199. 
Water Nymphs, drinking at the 

Fountain, To the, 183. 
Way, The, 362. 
Weaknesse in woes. His, 168. 
Weare, M. John, Councellour, To 

his honoured friend, 198. 
Weeping Cherry, The, 12. 
Welcome to Sack, The, 77. 
Welcome what comes, 343. 
Western wind. To the, 103. 
Westmerland, Earle of. To the, 40. 
Westmorland, the right Honour- 
able Mildmay, Earle of. To, 100, 

171. 
What God is, 330. 
What kind of Mistresse he would 

have, 228. 
Wheeler, Mistresse Eliza. : 

A Dialogue betwixt himselfe 
and, under tlie name of 
Amarillis, 316. 

Under the name of Amarillis, 46. 

Under the name of the lost 
Shepardesse, 106. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Penelope, To Ms 

Kinswoman, 187. 



When he would have his verses 

read, 7. 
Whips, 333. 
White Island : or place of the 

Blest, The, 366. 
Why Flowers change colour, 15. 
Wicks, M. John : 

A Parana2ticall, or Advisive 
Verse, to his friend, 229. 

His age, dedicated to, 132. 

To liis peculiar friend, 314. 
Widdowes teares, The : or. Dirge 

of Dorcas, 363. 
Wifethatdyed mad with Jealousie, 

Upon a, 52. 
Will the cause of Woe, The, 360. 
Willan, M. Leonard, To, his pecu- 
liar friend, 291. 
Willand, Mistresse Mary, To, 189. 
Willow Garland, The, 160. 
Willow-tree, To the, 106. 
Winding-sheet, His, 188. 
Wingfield, Master John, To his 

Brother in Law, 207. 
Wish, His, 59, 287. 
Wit punisht, prospers most, 310. 
Woman and Mary Upon, 376. 
Women : 

A Defence for, 276. 

In praise of, 245. 

No fault in, 118. 

Upon some, 76. 

Uselesse, 290. 
Wounded Heart, The, 10. 
Wrinkles, Upon, 143. 
Writing, 268. 

Yew and Cypresse, To the, to 
grace his Funerall, m. 

Yorke, Duke of. The Poets good 
wishes for the most hopeful! and 
handsome Prince, the, 107. 

Youth, and Age, 373. 

Youth, To, 224. 

Zeal required in Love, 31. 



INDEX OF FIRST LINES. 



A bachelour I will ..... 

A Christall VioU Cupid brought 

A funerall stone ..... 

A golden Flie once shew'd to me 

A Gyges Ring they beare about them still 

A Just man's like a Rock that turnes the wroth 

A little mushroome table spred 

A little Saint best fits a little Shrine 

A long-lifes-day I've taken paines . 

A man prepar'd against all ills to come . 

A mans transgression God do's then remit 

A master of a house (as I have read) 

A prayer, that is said alone . 

A rowle of Parchment Clunn about him beares 

A sweet disorder in the dresse 

A wanton and lascivious eye . 

A way enchac't with glasse & beads 

A wearied Pilgrim, I have wandred here . 

A willow Garland thou did'st send . 

About the sweet bag of a Bee . 

Abundant plagues I late have had . 

Adverse and prosperous Fortunes both work on 

Adversity hurts none, but onely such 

Afflictions bring us joy in times to come . 

Afflictions they most profitable are . 

After the Feast (my Shapcof) see 

After the rare Arch-Poet Johnson dy'd . 

After this life, the wages shall 

After thy labour take thine ease 

After true sorrow for our sinnes, our strife 

Against diseases here the strongest fence 

Ah Ben \ ..... . 

Ah Biancha ! now I see. 

Ah, cruell Love ! must I endure 

Ah ! Lycidas, come tell me why 

Ah my Anihea ! Must my heart still break ? 

Ah my Perilla ! do'st thou grieve to see . 

Ah Posthumus ! Our yeares hence flye 

Ai me ! I love, give him your hand to kisse 

Alas I can't, for tell me how . 

All are not ill Plots, that doe sometimes faile 

All has been plundered from me, but my wit 

All I have lost, that co'd be rapt from me 

All things are open to these two events . 



42 2 Index of First Lines. 

All things decay with Time : The Forrest sees 

All things o'r-rul'd are here by Chance 

All things subjected are to Fate 

Along, come along .... 

Along the dark, and silent night 

Although our suffering meet with no reliefe 

Although we cannot turne the fervent fit . 

Am I despis'd, because you say 

Among disasters that discention brings . 

Among the Mirths, as I walkt 

Among these Tempests great and manifold 

Among thy Fancies, tell me this 

And as time past when Cato the Severe . 

And Cruell Maid, because I gee 

And must we part, because some say 

Angells are called Gods ; yet of them, none 

Angry if Irene be . 

A nthea bade me tye her shooe 

Anthea I am going hence 

Anthea laught, and fearing lest excesse 

Apollo sings, his harpe resounds ; give roome 

Art quickens Nature ; Care will make a face 

Art thou not destin'd ? then, with hast, go on 

As Gilly flowers do but stay . 

As in our clothes, so likewise he who lookes 

As is your name, so is your comely face . 

As Julia once a-slumb'ring lay 

As lately I a Garland bound . 

As many Lawes and Lawyers do expresse 

As my little Pot doth boyle . 

As oft as Night is banish'd by the Mome 

As shews the Aire, when with a Rain-bow grac'd 

As Sun-beames pierce the glasse, and streaming in 

As thou deserv'st, be proud ; then gladly let . 

As wearied Pilgrims, once possest ... 

Aske me what hunger is, and He reply 

Aske me, why I do not sing .... 

Aske me why I send you here ... 

At Draw-Gloves we'l play .... 

At my homely Country-seat .... 

At Post and Paire, or Slam, Tom Tuck would play 

At Stool-ball, Lucia, let us play 

Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt 

Away with silks, away with Lawn . 

Bacchus, let me drink no more 

Bad are all surfeits : but Physitians call . 

Bad are the times. Sil. And wors then they are we 

Be bold my Booke, nor be abasht, or feare 

Be not dismaide, though crosses cast thee downe 

Be not proud, but now encUiie , . , 



PAGE 



Index of First Lines. 423 



Be the Mistresse of my choice 

Be those few hours, which I have yet to spend' 

Beauti's no other but a lovely Grace 

Beauty, no other thing is, then a Beame . 

Before Mans fall, the Rose was born 

Before the Press scarce one co'd see 

Begin to charme, and as thou stroak'st mine eares 

Beginne with Jove ; then is the worke halfe done 

Bell-man of Night, if I about shall go 

Besides us two, i' th' Temple here's not one 

Biancha, Let ..... 

Bid me to live, and I will live 

Bind me but to thee with thine haire 

Blessings, in abundance come 

Born I was to be old .... 

Borne I was to meet with Age 

Both you two have .... 

Break off Delay, since we but read of one 

Breathe, Julia, breathe, and He protest . 

Bright Tulips, we do know 

Bring me my Rose-buds, Drawer come 

Bring the holy crust of Bread. 

Brisk methinks I am, and fine 

Burne, or drowne me, choose ye whether . 

But borne, and like a short Delight . 

By Dream I saw, one of the three . 

By houres we all live here, in Heaven is known 

By so much, vertue is the lesse 

By the next kindling of the day 

By the weak'st mean things mighty are o'l^ethrown 

By those soft Tods of wooll . 

By Time, and Counsell, doe the best we can 

Call me no more ..... 

Can I not come to Thee, my God, for these 

Can I not sin, but thou wilt be 

Care keepes the Conquest ; 'tis no lesse renowne 

Charm me asleep, and melt me so . 

Charms, that call down the moon ffom out her sphere 

Charon, O Charon, draw thy Boat to th' Shore 

Charon I O gentle Charon ! let me wooe thee- 

Cherrie-Ripe, Ripe, Ripe, I cry 

Choose me your Valentine 

Christ, He requires still, wheresoere He comes 

Christ, I have read, did to His Chaplains say 

Christ never did so great a work, but there 

Christ took our Nature on Him, not that He 

Christ was not sad, i'th garden, for His own 

Christ, when He hung the dreadful! Crosse upon 

Gleere are her eyes .... 

Gome and let's in solemn wise 



424 Index of First Lines. 



Come Anthea, know thou this . 

Come Anthea let us two .... 

Come blithefuU Neatherds, let us lay 

Come, bring with a noise 

Come bring your sampler, and with Art . 

Come come away ..... 

Come down, and dance ye in the toyle 

Come guard this night the Christmas-Pie . 

Come, leave this loathed Country-life, and then 

Come pitie us, all ye, who see . 

Come sit we by the fires side . 

Come sit we under yonder Tree 

Come, skiUuU Lupo, now, and take . 

Come Sons of Summer, by whose toile 

Come then, and like two Doves with silv'rie wings 

Come thou not neere those men, who are like Bread 

Come thou, who art the Wine, and wit . 

Come to me God ; but do not come 

Come with the Spring-time, forth Fair Maid, and be 

Command the Roofe great Genius, and from thence 

Confession twofold is (as Austine says) 

Conformity gives comelinesse to things 

Conformity was ever knowne .... 

Conquer we shall, but we must first contend 

Consider sorrowes, how they are aright . 

Consult ere thou begin' st, that done, go on 

Cupid as he lay among ..... 

Cynthius pluck ye by the eare 

Dark and dull night, flie hence away 
Dead falls the Cause, if once the Hand be mute 
Dean-bourn, farewell ; I never look to see 
Deare Perenna, prethee come .... 

Deare, though to part it be a Hell . 

Dearest of thousands, now the time drawes neere 

Deer God ....... 

Despaire takes heart, when ther's no hope to speed 
Dew sate on Julia's haire .... 

Did I or love, or could I others draw 

Die ere long I'm sure, I shall .... 

Discreet and prudent we that Discord call 

Display thy breasts, my Julia, there let me 

Do with me, God I as Thou didst deal with John 

Do's Fortune rend thee ? Beare with thy hard Fate 

Down with the Rosemary and Bayes 

Down with the Rosemary, and so . 

Dread not the shackles : on with thine intent . 

Drink Wine, and live here blithefuU, while ye may 

Drinke up ...... . 

Droop, droop no more, or hang the head . 
Drowning, drowning, I espie .... 



Index of First Lines. 425 



Dry your sweet cheek, long drown' d with sorrows raine 
Dull to my selfe, and almost dead to these 

Each must, in vertue, strive for to excel! . 

Eaten I have ; and though I had good cheere 

Empires of Kings, are now, and ever were 

End now the White-loafe, & the Pye 

Ere I goe hence and bee noe more . 

Every time seemes short to be 

Evill no Nature hath ; the losse of good 

Examples lead us, and wee likely see 

Excesse is sluttish : keepe the meane ; for why ? 

Fain would I kiss my Julia's dainty Leg 

Faire and foule dayes trip Crosse and Pile ; The faire 

Faire DafEadills, we weep to see 

Faire pledges of a fruitf uU Tree 

Faire was the Dawne ; and but e'ne now the Skies 

Faith is a thing that's four-square ; let it fall 

Fames pillar here, at last, we set 

Farewell thou Thing, time-past so knowne, so deare 

Fat be my Hinde ; unlearned be my wife 

Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'rcome 

Fill me a mighty Bowie .... 

Fill me my Wine in Christall ; thus, and thus 

First, April, she with mellow showrs 

First, for Effusions due unto the dead 

First, for your shape, the curious cannot shew 

First, may the hand of bounty bring 

First offer Incense, then thy field and meads 

Fled are the Frosts, and now the Fields appeare 

Fly hence. Pale Care, noe more remember 

Fly me not, though I be gray . 

Fly to my Mistresse, pretty pilfring Bee . 

Fold now thine armes ; and hang the head 

Fooles are they, who never know . 

For a kisse or two, confesse . 

For all our workes, a recompence is sure . 

For all thy many courtesies to me . 

For being comely, consonant, and free 

For brave comportment, wit without offence 

For civill, cleane, and circumcised wit 

For each one Body, that i'th earth is sowne 

For my embalming, Julia, do but this 

For my neighbour lie not know 

For my part, I never care 

For one so rarely tun'd to fit all parts 

For punishment in warre, it will sufi&ce . 

For sport my Julia threw a Lace 

For these Transgressions which thou here dost see 

For Those my unbaptized Rhimes . 



426 Index of First Lines. 



For truth I may this sentence tell . 

Fortune did never favour one 

Fortune no higher Project can devise 

Fortune's a blind profuser of her own 

Fresh strowings allow .... 

Frollick Virgins once these were 

From me my Silvia ranne away 

From noise of Scare-fires rest ye free 

From the dull confines of the drooping West 

From the Temple to your home 

From this bleeding hand of mine . 

Gather ye Rose-buds while ye may . 

Get up, get up for shame, the Blooming Morne 

Give house-roome to the best ; 'Tis never known 

Give, if thou canst, an Almes ; if not, afiord 

Give me a Cell ..... 

Give me a man that is not dull 

Give me Honours : what are these . 

Give me one kisse ..... 

Give me that man, that dares bestride 

Give me the food that satisfies a Guest . 

Give me wine, and give me meate . 

Give unto all, lest he, whom thou deni'st . 

Give Want her welcome if she comes ; we find 

Give way, and be ye ravisht by the Sun . 

Give way, give way, now, now my Charles shines here 

Give way, give way ye Gates, and win 

Glide, gentle streams, and beare 

Glory be to the Graces .... 

Glory no other thing is (Twllie sayes) 

Goe happy Rose, and enterwove 

Go hence, and with this parting kisse 

Goe hence away, and in thy parting know 

Go I must ; when I am gone . 

Go on brave Hopton, to effectuate that . 

Goe, perjur'd man ; and if thou ere return 

Go prettie child, and beare this Flower . 

Goe thou forth my booke, though late 

Go wooe young Charles no more to looke 

God, as He is most Holy knowne . 

God, as He's potent, so He's likewise known 

God (as the learned Damascen doth write) 

God bought man here with his hearts blood expence 

God can do ail things, save but what are known 

God can't be wrathfuU ; but we may conclude . 

God. co'd have made all rich, or all men poore . 

God, did forbid the Israelites, to bring 

God doth embrace the good with love ; & gaines 

God doth not promise here to man, that He 

God from our eyes all teares hereafter wipes 



Index of First Lines. 427 



God gives not onely corne, for need 

God gives to none so absolute an Ease 

God had but one Son free from sin ; but none 

God has a Right Hand, but is quite bereft 

God has foure keyes, which He reserves alone 

God has his whips here to a twofold end . 

God hates the Duall Number ; being known 

God hath this world for many made ; 'tis true 

God hath two wings, which He doth ever move 

God He refuseth no man ; but makes way 

God He rejects all Prayers that are sleight 

God heares us when we pray, but yet defers 

God hides from man the reck'ning Day, that He 

God in His own Day will be then severe . 

God, in the holy Tongue, they call . 

God is above the spnere of our esteem 

God is all fore-part ; for, we never see 

God is all-present to what e're we do 

God is all-sufferance here ; here He doth show - 

God, is His Name of Nature ; but that word . 

God is Jehovah cal'd ; which name of His 

God is more here, then in another place . 

God is not onely merciful!, to call . 

God is not onely said to be . 

God is so potent, as His Power can 

God is then said for to descend, when He 

God loads, and unloads, (thus His work begins) 

God makes not good men wantons, but doth bring 

God n'ere afflicts us more then our desert 

God on our Youth bestowes but little ease 

God pardons those, who do through frailty sin . 

God scourgeth some severely, some He spares . 

God still rewards us more then our desert 

God strikes His Church, but 'tis to this intent . 

God suffers not His Saints, and Servants deere . 

God tempteth no one (as S. Aug'stine saith) 

God then confounds mans face, when He no,t hears 

God I to my little meale and oyle . 

God when for sin He makes His Children smart 

God when He's angry here with any one '. 

God when He takes my goods and chattels hence 

God, who me gives a will for to repent 

God, who's in Heav'n, will hear from thence 

God will have all, or none ; serve Him, or fall . 

Gods boundlesse mercy is (to sinful! man) 

Gods Bounty, that ebbs lesse and lesse 

God's evident, and may be said to be 

Gods Grace deserves here to be daily fed . 

Gods Hands are round, & smooth, that gifts may fall 

Gods Prescience makes none sinfull ; but th' offence 

God's present ev'ry where ; but most of all 



428 Index of First Lines. 

Gods Rod doth watch while men do sleep ; & then 

God's said our hearts to harden then 

God's said to dwell there, wheresoever He 

God's said to leave this place, and for to come . 

God's undivided. One in Persons Three 

Goddesse, I begin an Art .... 

Goddesse, I do love a Girle .... 

Goddesse of Youth, and Lady of the Spring 

Goes the world now, it will with thee goe hard . 

Gold I have none, but I present my need 

Gold I've none, for use or show 

Gold serves for Tribute to the King . 

Gone she is a long, long way .... 

Good and great God I How sho'd I feare . 

Good day, Mirtillo. Mirt. And to you no lesse 

Good morrow to the Day so fair 

Good Precepts we must firmly hold 

Good princes must be pray'd for : for the bad . 

Good speed, for I this day .... 

Good things, that come of course, far lesse doe please 

Great Cities seldome rest : If there be none 

Great men by small meanes oft are overthrown 

Grow for two ends, it matters not at all 

Grow up in Beauty, as thou do'st begin 

Haile holy, and all-honour'd Tomb . 

Hang up Hooks, and Sheers to scare 

Hansome you are, and Proper you will be 

Happily I had a sight . 

Happy's that man, to whom God gives 

Hard are the two first staires unto a Crowne 

Hast thou attempted greatnesse ? then go on . 

Hast thou begun an act ? ne're then give o're . 

Haste is unhappy : What we Rashly do . 

Have, have ye no regard, all ye . . . 

Have I not blest Thee ? Then go forth ; nor fear 

Have ye beheld (with much delight) 

He that ascended in a cloud, shall come . 

He that is hurt seeks help : sin is the wound 

He that may sin, sins least ; Leave to transgresse 

He that will live of all cares dispossest 

He that will not love, must be . . . 

He who commends the vanquisht, speaks the Power 

He, who has suffer'd Ship-wrack, feares to saile 

He who wears Blacks, and mournes not for the Dead 

Health is no other (as the learned hold) . 

Health is the first good lent to men 

Heare ye Virgins, and lie teach 

Heav'n is most faire ; but fairer He 

Heaven is not given for our good works here 

Hell is no other, but a soundlesse pit 



Index of First Lines. 429 



Hell is the place where whipping-cheer abounds 

Helpe me I helpe me 1 now I call 

Help me, Julia, for to pray . 

Hence a blessed soule is fled . 

Hence, hence, profane ; soft silence let us have 

Hence, hence prophane, and none appeare 

Hence they have born my Lord : Behold 1 the Stone 

Her Eyes the Glow-worme lend thee 

Her pretty feet .... 

Here a little child I stand 

Here a pretty Baby lies . 

Here a solemne Fast we keepe 

Here down my wearyed limbs He lay 

Here, here I live .... 

Here, here I live with what my Board 

Here I my self e might likewise die . 

Here lies a Virgin, and as sweet 

Here lyes Johnson with the rest 

Here she lies, a pretty bud 

Here she lyes (in Bed of Spice) 

Here we are all, by day ; By night w'are hurl'd 

Here we securely live, and eate 

Holy-Rood come forth and shield 

Holy Water come and bring . 

Holy waters hither bring 

Honour thy Parents ; but good manners call 

Honour to you who sit . 

How am I bound to Two ! God, who doth give 

How am I ravisht ! When I do but see . 

How can I choose but love, and follow her 

How dull and dead are books, that cannot show 

How fierce was I, when I did see 

How long, Perenna, wilt thou see . 

How Love came in, I do not know . 

How rich a man is, all desire to know 

How rich and pleasing thou my Julia art 

How well contented in this private Grange 

Humble we must be, if to Heaven we go . 

I a Dirge will pen for thee 

I am holy, while I stand 

I am of all bereft . 

I am Sive-like, and can hold 

I am zeallesse, prethee pray 

I askt my Lucia but a kisse 

I ask't thee oft, what Poets thou hast read 

I beginne to waine in sight 

I brake thy Bracelet 'gainst my will 

I bring ye Love. Quest. What will love do ? 

I burn, I burn ; and beg of you 

I call, I call, who doe ye call ? 



43 o Index of First Lines. 



I can but name thee, and methinks I call 

I cannot love, as I have lov'd before 

I cannot pipe as I was wont to do . 

I cannot surfer ; And in this, my part 

I co'd but see thee yesterday . 

I co'd never love indeed 

I could wish you all, who love 

I crawle, I creep ; my Christ, I come 

I dare not ask a kisse 

I dislikt but even now . 

I do believe, that die I must 

I doe love I know not what 

I do not love, nor can it be 

I do not love to wed 

I dream'd we both were in a bed 

I dreamt, last night. Thou didst transfuse 

I dreamt the Roses one time went . 

I feare no Earthly Powers 

I freeze, I freeze, and nothing dwels 

I have a leaden, thou a shaft of gold 

I have been wanton, and too bold I feare 

I haue behelde two louers in a night 

I have lost, and lately, these . 

I have my Laurel Chaplet on my head 

I heard ye co'd coole heat ; and came 

I held Love's head while it did ake . 

1 lately fri'd, but now behold . 

I make no haste to have my Numbers read 

I must .,...• 

I plaid with Love, as with the fire . 

I prest my Julia's lips, and in the kisse 

I saw a Cherry weep, and why ? 

I saw a Flie within a Beade . 

I saw about her spotlesse wrist 

I send, I send here my supremest kiss 

I sing of Brooks, of Blossomes, Birds, and Bowers 

I sing thy praise lacchus 

I who have favour' d many, come to be 

I will be short, and having quickly hurl'd 

I will confesse 

I will no longer kiss 

I would to God, that mine old age might have 

I'le come, I'le creep, (though Thou dost threat) 

lie come to thee in all those shapes . 

I'le doe my best to win, when' ere I wooe 

He, get me hence .... 

I'le hope no more .... 

He sing no more, nor will I longer write 

I'le to thee a Simnell bring 

He write, because He give 

Il'e write no more of Love ; but now repeat 



Index of First Lines. 431 



I'm free from thee ; and thou no more shalt heare 

I'm sick of Love ; O let me lie . . . 

I've paid Thee, what I promis'd ; that's not All 

If Accusation onely can draw blood 

If after rude and boystrous seas 

If all transgressions here should have their pay 

If any thing delight me for to print 

If deare Anihea, my hard fate it be . 

If hap it must, that I must see thee lye . 

If I dare write to You, my Lord, who are 

If I have plaid the Truant, or have here . 

If I kisse Anihea's brest .... 

If I lye unburied Sir .... 

If Kings and kingdomes, once distracted be 

If little labour, little are our gaines . 

If meat the Gods give, I the steame 

If Men can say that beauty dyes 

If 'mongst my many Poems, I can see 

If Nature do deny ..... 

If nine times you your Bride-groome kisse 

If so be a Toad be laid .... 

If that my Fate has now fulfill' d my yeere 

If thou aske me (Deare) wherefore . 

If Thou beest taken, God forbid 

If thou dislik'st the Piece thou light'st On first 

If thou hast found an honie-combe . 

If warre, or want shall make me grow so poore 

If well the Dice runne, lets applaud the cast 

If well thou hast begun, goe on fore-right 

If when these L5Ticks (Cesar) You shall heare . 

If wholsome Diet can re-cure a man 

If ye feare to be affrighted 

If ye will with Mab find grace 

Immortall clothing I put on . 

Imparitie doth ever discord bring . 

In a Dreame, Love bad me go . . 

In all our high designments, 'twill appeare 

In all thy need, be thou possest 

In Battailes what disasters fall 

In desp'rate cases, all, or most are known 

In doing justice, God shall then be known 

In God there's nothing, but 'tis known to be 

In God's commands, ne're ask the reason why 

In's Tusc'lanes, Tullie doth confesse 

In holy meetings, there a man may be . 

In Man, Ambition is the common'st thing 

In Numbers, and but these few 

In Prayer the Lips ne're act the winning part 

In sober mornings, doe not thou reherse . 

In the hope of ease to come . 

In the houre of my distresse . 



432 Index of First Lines. 



In the morning when ye rise . 

In the old Scripture I have often read 

In things a moderation keepe . 

In this little Urne is laid 

In this little Vault she lyes 

In this misfortune Kings doe most excell 

In this world (the Isle of Dreames) . 

In time of life, I grac't ye with my Verse 

In vain our labours are, whatsoe're they be 

In wayes to greatnesse think on this 

Instead of Orient Pearls of Jet 

Instruct me now, what love will do . 

Is this a Fast, to keep . 

Is this a life, to break thy sleep ? . 

It is sufficient if we pray 

It was, and still my care is 

Jacob Gods Beggar was ; and so we wait 

Jealous Girles these sometimes were 

Jehovah, as Boetius saith 

Jove may afford us thousands of reliefs 

Julia and I did lately sit 

Julia, I bring .... 

Julia, if I chance to die . 

Julia was carelesse, and withall 

Julia, when thy Herrick dies . 

Justly our dearest Saviour may abhorre us 

Kindle the Christmas Brand, and then . 
Kings must be dauntlesse : Subjects will contemne 
Kings must not oft be seen by publike eyes 
Kings must not only cherish up the good . 
Kings must not use the Axe for each offence 
Kissing and bussing differ both in this 
Knew'st thou, one moneth we'd take thy life away 
Know when to speake ; for many times it brings 

Labour we must, and labour hard . 

Lady I intreate yow weare .... 

Laid out for dead, let thy last kindnesse be 

Lasciviousnesse is known to be 

Last night I drew up mine Account 

Lay by the good a while ; a resting field . 

Learn this of me, where e'r thy Lot doth fall . 

Let all chaste Matrons, when they chance to see 

Let but thy voice engender with the string 

Let faire or foule my Mistresse be . 

Let Kings and Rulers, learne this line from me 

Let Kings Command, and doe the best they may 

Let me be warme ; let me be fully fed 

Let me not live, if I not love . 



Index of First Lines. 433 



Let me sleep this night away . 
Let moderation on thy passions waite 
Let not that Day Gods Friends and Servants scare 
Let not thy Tomb-stone e're be laid by me 
Let others look for Pearle and Gold 
Let others to the Printing Presse run fast 
Let the superstitious wife 
Let there be Patrons ; Patrons like to thee 
Let us now take time, and play 
Let us (though late) at last (my Silvia) wed 
Let's be jocund while we may 
Lets call for Hymen if agreed thou art 
Let's live in hast ; use pleasures while we may 
Let's live with that smal pittance that we have 
Lets now take our time .... 
Let's strive to be the best ; the Gods, we know it 
Life is the Bodies light ; which once declining 
Life of my life, take not so soone thy flight 
Like those infernall Deities which eate 
Like to a Bride, come forth my Book, at last 
Like to the Income must be our expence 
Like will to like, each Creature loves his kinde 
LiUies will languish ; Violets look ill 
Little you are ; for Womans sake be proud 
Live by thy Muse thou shalt ; when others die 
Live, live with me, and thou shalt see 
Live with a thrifty, not a needy Fate 
Look how our foule Dayes do exceed our faire 
Look, how the Rainbow doth appeare 
Looke in my Book, and herein see . 
Look upon Sapho's lip, and you will swear 
Lord, do not beat me .... 
Lord, I am like to Misletoe 
Lord, I confesse, that Thou alone art able 
Lord, Thou hast given me a cell 
Lost to the world ; lost to my selfe ; alone 
Loth to depart, but yet at last, each one . 
Love and my selfe (beleeve me) on a day . 
Love and the Graces evermore do wait 
Love bade me aske a gift 
Love brought me to a silent Grove . 
Love he that will ; it best likes me 
Love, I have broke .... 
Love, I recant ..... 
Love in a showre of Blossomes came 
Love is a Circle, and an Endlesse Sphere 
Love is a circle that doth restlesse move . 
Love is a kind of warre ; Hence those who feare 
Love is a Leven, and a loving kisse . 
Love is a sirrup ,• and who e're we see 
Love is maintain' d by wealth ; when all is spent 

aF 



434 Index of First Lines. 



Love, like a Beggar, came to me 

Love, like a Gypsie, lately came 

Love love bfegets, then never be 

Love, love me now, because I place 

Love on a day (wise Poets tell) 

Love scorch'd my finger, but did spare . 

Love's a thing, (as I do heare) 

Love's of it self, too sweet ; the best of all 

Love-sick I am, and must endure . 

Maidens tell me I am old 

Maids nay's' are nothing, they are shie 

Make haste away, and let one be 

Make, make me Thine, my gracious God . 

Make me a heaven ; and make me there . 

Man is a Watch, wound up at first, but never 

Man is compos' d here of a two-fold part . 

Man knowes where first he ships himselfe ; but he 

Man may at first transgress, but next do well 

Man may Want Land to live in ; but for all 

Man must do well out of a good intent . 

Mans disposition is for to requite . 

Many we are, and yet but few possesse . 

May his pretty Duke-ship grow 

Men are not born Kings, but are men renown'd 

Men are suspicious ; prone to discontent . 

Men ihust have Bounds howfarre to walke ; for we 

Men say y'are faire ; and faire ye are, 'tis true 

Mercy, the wise Athenians held to be 

Me thought I saw (as I did dreame in bed) 

Me thought, (last night) love in an anger came . 

Mighty Neptune, may it please 

Milk stil your Fountains, and your Springs, for why 

Mine eyes, like clouds, were drizling raine 

Mop-ey'd I am, as some have said . 

More discontents I never had .... 

More white then whitest Lillies far . 

Musick, thou Queen of Heaven, Care-charming spel 

My dearest Love, since thou wilt go 

My faithful friend, if you can see . 

My God, I'm wounded by my sin . 

My God 1 looke on me with thine eye 

My head doth ake ..... 

My Lucia in the deaw did go . 

My many cares and much distress . 

My Muse in Meads has spent her many houres 

My soule would one day goe and seeke 

My wearied Barke, O Let it now be Crown'd . 

My wboing's ended : now my wedding's neere . 

Naught are all Women : I say no . 



276 



Index of First Lines. 435 



Need is no vice at all ; though here it be . 

Nero commanded ; but withdrew his eyes 

Never my Book's perfection did appeare . 

Never was Day so over-sick with showres 

Next is your lot (Faire) to be number'd one 

Night hath no wings, to him that cannot sleep 

Night hides our thefts ; all faults then pardon'd be 

Night makes no difference 'twixt the Priest and Clark 

No fault in women to refuse' .... 

No grief is grown so desperate, but the ill 

No man comes late unto that place from whence 

No man is tempted so, but may o'recome 

No man so well a Kingdome Rules, as He 

No man such rare parts hath, that he can swim 

No more my Silvia, do I mean to pray 

No more shall I, since I am driven hence 

No newes of Navies burnt at Seas . 

No trust to Metals nor to Marbles, when 

No wrath of Men, or rage of Seas . 

Noah the first was (as Tradition sayes) 

None goes to warfare, but with this intent 

Noone-day and Midnight shall at once be seene 

Nor art thou lesse esteem'd, that I have plac'd 

Nor is my Number full, till I inscribe 

Nor think that Thou in this my Booke art worst 

Not all thy flushing Sunnes are set . 

Nothing can be more loathsome, then to see 

Nothing comes Free-cost here ; Jove will not let 

Nothing hard, or harsh can prove . 

Nothing is New : we walk where others went 

Now, if you love me, tell me . 

Now is the time for mirth 

Now is the time, when all the lights wax dim 

Now is your turne (my Dearest) to be set 

Now, now's the time ; so oft by truth 

Now, now the mirth comes 

Now thou art dead, no eye shall ever see . 

O Earth I Earth I Earth heare thou my voice, and be 

O Jealousie, that art 

O Jupiter, sho'd I speake ill . 

O thou, the wonder of all dayes 

O ! Times most bad 

O Yeares ! and Age ! Farewell 

O ! you the Virgins nine 

Of all our parts, the eyes expresse 

Of all the good things whatsoe're we do 

Of all those three-brave-brothers, fain i' th' Warre 

Of both our Fortunes good and bad we find 

Offer thy gift ; but first the Law commands 

Oft bend the Bow, and thou with ease shalt do 



4 3 6 Index of First Lines. 

Oft have I heard both Youths and Virgins say . 

Old Parson Beams hunts six dayes of the week 

Old wives have often told, how they 

On, as thou hast begunne, brave youth, and get 

On with thy worke, though thou beest hardly prest 

One ask'd me where the Roses grew ? 

One Birth our Saviour had ; the like none yet 

One Eare tingles ; some there be 

One feeds on Lard, and yet is leane 

One man repentant is of more esteem 

One more by Thee, Love, and Desert have sent 

One night i' th' yeare, my dearest Beauties, come 

One of the five straight branches of my hand 

One onely fire has Hell ; but yet it shall . 

One silent night of late .... 

Onely a little more .... 

Open thy gates ..... 

Or lookt 1 back unto the Times hence flown 

Orpheus he went (as Poets tell) 

Other mens sins wee ever beare in mind . 

Our Bastard-children are but like to Plate 

Our Crosses are no other then the rods 

Our Honours, and our Commendations be 

Our Houshold-gods our Parents be . 

Our mortall parts may wrapt in Seare-cloths lye 

Our present Teares here (not our present laughter) 

Out of the world he must, who once comes in . 



Paradise is (as from the Learn'd I gather) 

Pardon me God, (once more I Thee intreat) 

Pardon my trespasse {Silvia) I confesse . 

Part of the worke remaines ; one part is past 

Partly worke and partly play . 

Paul, he began ill, but he ended well 

Permit me, Julia, now to goe away 

Permit mine eyes to see .... 

Phoebus ! when that I a Verse 

Physitians fight not against men ; but these 

Physitians say Repletion springs 

Play I co'd once ; but (gentle friend) you see 

Play Phoebus on thy Lute 

Play their offensive and defensive parts . 

Please your Grace, from out your Store . 

Ponder my words, if so that any be 

Praise they that will Times past, I joy to see 

Prat He writes Satyres ; but herein's the fault 

Prayers and Praises are those spotlesse two 

Predestination is the Cause alone 

Prepare for Songs ; He's come, He's come 

Preposterous is that Government, (and rude) 

Prepost'rous is that order, when we run . 



Index of First Twines. 437 



Princes and Fav'rites are most deere, while tliey 

Prue, my dearest Maid, is sick 

Put oS Thy Robe of Purple, then go on . 

Put on thy Holy FilUtings, and so . 

Put on your silks ; and piece by piece 

Putrefaction is the end .... 

Rapine has yet tooke nought from me 

Rare are thy cheeks Susanna, which do show 

Rare is the voice it selfe ; but when we sing 

Rare Temples thou hast seen, I know 

Reach, with your whiter hands, to me 

Read thou my Lines, my Swetnaham, if there be 

Readers wee entreat ye pray . 

Reproach we may the living ; not the dead 

Rise, Houshold-gods, and let us goe 

Roaring is nothing but a weeping part 

Roses at first were white 

Roses, you can never die 

Sabbaths are threefold, (as S. Austine sayes :) 

Sadly I walk't within the field 

Sapho, I will chuse to go 

Science in God, is known to be 

Sea-born Goddesse, let me be . 

See, and not see ; and if thou chance t'espie 

See how the poore do waiting stand . 

Seeing thee Soame, I see a Goodly man . 

See'st thou that Cloud as silver cleare 

Seest thou that Cloud that rides in State . 

Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares 

Shall I a daily Begger be . . . 

Shall I go to Love and tell 

Shame checks our first attempts ; but then 'tis prov'd 

Shame is a bad attendant to a State 

Shapcot ! To thee the Fairy State 

She by the River sate, and sitting there . 

She wept upon her cheeks, and weeping so 

Sho'd I not put on Blacks, when each one here 

Shut not so soon ; the duU-ey'd night 

Sick is ^MiAea, sickly is the spring . 

Sin is an act so free, that if we shall 

Sin is the cause of death ; and sin's alone 

Sin leads the way, but as it goes, it feels . 

Sin never slew a soule, unlesse there went 

Sin no Existence ; Nature none it hath . 

Sin once reacht up to Gods eternall Sphere 

Since for thy full deserts (with all the rest 

Since Jach and Jill both wicked be . 

Since shed or Cottage I have none 

Since to th' Country first I came 



43 8 Index of First Lines. 

Sing me to death ; for till thy voice be cleaxe 

Sinners confounded are a twofold way 

Sitting alone (as one forsook) .... 

Smooth was the Sea, and seem'd to call . 

So Good-luck came, and on my roofe did light . 

So long (it seem'd) as Manes Faith was small . 

So long you did not sing, or touch your Lute . 

So look the mornings when the Sun 

So looks A nthea, when in bed she lyes 

So smell those odours that do rise . 

So smooth, so sweet, so silv'ry is thy voice 

So soft streams meet, so springs with gladder smiles 

Some ask'd me where the Rubies grew ? . 

Some parts may perish ; dye thou canst not all 

Some salve to every sore, we may apply . 

Some would know ...... 

Sorrowes divided amongst many, lesse 

Sorrowes our portion are : Ere hence we goe . 

Speak, did the Bloud of Abel cry . 

Spend Harmless shade thy nightly Houres 

Spring with the Larke, most comely Bride, and meet 

Spur jingles now, and sweares by no meane oathes 

Stand by the Magick of my powerfuU Rhymes . 

Stand forth brave man, since Fate has made thee here 

Stand with thy Graces forth. Brave man, and rise 

Stately Goddesse, do thou please . 

Stay while ye will, or goe .... 

Still take advice : though counsels when they flye 
Still to our gains our chief respect is had . 
Store of courage to me grant .... 

Stripes justly given yerk us (with their fall) 
Studies themselves will languish and decay 
Suffer thy legs, but not thy tongue to walk 
Suspicion, Discontent, and Strife 
Sweet AmarilHs, by a Spring's 
Sweet are my Julia's lips and cleane 
Sweet, be not proud of those two eyes 
Sweet Bridget blusht, & therewithal! 
Sweet Country life, to such unknown 
Sweet Oenone, doe but say 
Sweet virgin, that I do not set 
Sweet Western Wind, whose luck it is 

Take mine advise, and go not neere 

Teares most prevaile ; with teares too thou mayst move 

Teares quickly drie : griefes will in time decay. 

Teares, though th'are here below the sinners brine 

Tell, if thou canst, (and truly) whence doth come 

Tell me rich man, for what intent . 

Tell me, what needs those rich deceits 

TeU me young man, or did the Muses bring \ 



273 
280 
286 
223 
156 

384 
27s 
292 



Index of First Lines. 439 



Tell that Brave Man, fain thou wo'dst have access 

Tell us, thou cleere and heavenly Tongue 

Temptations hurt not, though they have accesse 

Thanksgiving for a former, doth invite . 

That Christ did die, the Pagan saith 

That flow of Gallants which approach 

That for seven Lusters I did never come . 

That Happines do's still the longest thrive 

That Houre-glasse, which there ye see 

That little prettie bleeding part 

That Love last long ; let it thy first care be 

That love 'twixt men do's ever longest last 

That Manna, which God on His people cast 

That Morne which saw me made a Bride 

That Prince must govern with a gentle hand 

That Prince takes soone enough the Victors roome 

That Prince, who may doe nothing but what's just 

That Princes may possesse a surer seat . 

That there's a God, we all do know . 

That was the Proverb. Let my mistresse be 

The Bad among the Good are here mixt ever 

The bloud of A bel was a thing 

The Body is the Soules poore house, or home 

The body's salt, the soule is ; which when gon 

The bound (almost) now of my book I see 

The Doctors, in the Talmud, say . 

The factions of the great ones call . 

The fire of Hell this strange condition hath 

The Gods require the thighes . 

The Gods to Kings the Judgement give to sway 

The Hag is astride .... 

The Jewes their beds, and offices of ease . 

The Jewes, when they built Houses (I have read) 

The lesse our sorrowes here and suffrings cease . 

The Lictors bundl'd up their rods : beside 

The longer thred of life we spin 

The May-pole is up 

The mellow touch of musick most doth wound 

The Mountains of the Scriptures are (some say) 

The only comfort of my life .... 

The Person crowns the Place ; your lot doth fall 

The Power of Princes rests in the Consent 

The readinesse of doing, doth expresse . 

The repetition of the name made known . 

The Rose was sick, and smiling di'd 

The Saints-bell calls ; and, Julia, I must read 

The same, who crownes the Conquerour, will be 

The seeds of Treason choake up as they spring 

The shame of mans face is no more . 

The strength of Baptisme, that's within . 

The sup'rabundance of my store 



44 o Index of First Lines. 



The teares of Saints more sweet by farre 

The time the Bridegroom stayes from hence 

The Twi-light is no other thing (we say) . 

The Virgin Marie was (as I have read) . 

The Virgin-Mother stood at distance (there) 

The work is done ; now let my Lawrell be 

The worke is done : young men, and maidens set 

Then did I live when I did see 

There is no evill that we do commit 

There's no constraint to do amisse . 

These fresh beauties (we can prove) 

These Springs were Maidens once that lov'd 

These Summer-Birds did with thy master stay 

These temp'rall goods God (the most Wise) commends 

Things are uncertain, and the more we get 

This Axiom I have often heard 

This Crosse-Tree here .... 

This Day is Yours, Great Charles ! and in this War 

This day my Julia thou must make 

This He tell ye by the way 

This is my comfort, when she's most unkind 

This is the height of Justice, that to doe . 

This Lady's short, that Mistresse she is tall 

This rule of manners I will teach my guests 

This Stone can tell the storie of my life . 

Those ends in War the best contentment bring 

Those Garments lasting evermore . 

Those ills that mortall men endure . 

Those possessions short-liv'd are 

Those Saints, which God loves best . 

Those Tapers, which we set upon the grave 

Thou art a plant sprung up to wither never 

Thou art to all lost love the best 

Tli'art hence removing, (hke a Shepherds Tent) 

Thou bidst me come away 

Thou bidst me come ; I cannot come ; for why 

Thou cam'st to cure me (Doctor) of my cold 

Thou gav'st me leave to kisse . 

Thou had'st the wreath before, now take the Tree 

Th'ast dar'd too farre : but Furie now forbeare 

Thou hast made many Houses for the Dead 

Thou hast promis'd. Lord, to be . 

Thou know'st, my Julia, that it is thy turne 

Thou mighty Lord and master of the L3nre 

Thou sail'st with others, in this Argus here 

Thou saist thou lov'st me Sapho ; I say no 

Thou say'st I'm dull ; if edge-lesse so I be 

Thou sayest Loves Dart 

Thou say'st my lines are hard 

Thou seest me Lucia this year droope 

Thou sent'st to me a True-love-knot ; but I 



Index of First Lines. 44 1 



Thou shalt not All die ; for while Love's fire shines 

Thou, thou that bear'st the sway . 

Thou who wilt not love, doe this 

Though a wise man all pressures can sustaine . 

Though by well-warding many blowes w'ave past 

Though Clock ...... 

Though Frankinsense the Deities require . 
Though from without no foes at all we feare 
Though good things answer many good intents 
Though hourely comforts from the Gods we see 
Though I cannot give thee fires 
Though long it be, yeeres may repay the debt 
Though Thou beest all that A dive Love . 
Thousands each day passe by, which wee 
Three fatall Sisters wait upon each sin 
Three lovely Sisters working were . 
Thrice, and above, blest (my soules halfe) art thou 
Thrice happie Roses, so much grac't, to have 
Through all the night .... 

Thus I 

Thy Azure Robe, I did behold 

Thy former coming was to cure 

Thy sooty Godhead, I desire . 

Till I shall come again, let this suffice 

Time is the Bound of things, where e're we go 

Time was upon ..... 

'Tis a known principle in War 

Tis but a dog-like madnesse in bad Kings 

'Tis Ev'ning, my Sweet .... 

'Tis hard to finde God, but to comprehend 

'Tis Heresie in others : In your face 

'Tis liberty to serve one Lord ; but he 

Tis much among the filthy to be clean 

'Tis never, or but seldome knowne . 

Tis no discomfort in the world to fall 

'Tis not a thousand Bullocks thies . 

'Tis not ev'ry day, that I . . . 

'Tis not greatness they require 

'Tis not the food, but the content . 

'Tis not the Walls, or purple, that defends 

'Tis said, as Cupid danc't among 

'Tis still observ'd, that Fame ne're sings . 

'Tis still observ'd, those men most valiant are 

'Tis the Chyrurgions praise, and height of Art 

Tis worse then barbarous cruelty to show 

To a Love-Feast we both invited are 

To all our wounds, here, whatsoe're they be 

To an old soare a long cure must goe on . 

To Bread and Water none is poore . 

To conquer'd men, some comfort 'tis to fall 

To Fetch me Wine my Lucia went . 



442 Index of First Lines. 



To find that Tree of Life, whose Fruits did feed 

To gather Flowers Sappha went 

To get thine ends, lay bashfulnesse aside . 

To him, who longs unto his Christ to go 

To his Book's end this last line he'd have plac't 

To joyn with them, who here confer 

To loose the button, is no lesse 

To me my Julia lately sent . 

To mortall men great loads allotted be 

To my revenge, and to her desp'rate feares 

To Print our Poems, the propulsive cause 

To read my Booke the Virgin shie . 

To safe-guard Man from wrongs, there nothing must 

To seek of God more then we well can find 

Tp sup with thee thou didst me home invite 

To this^ white Temple of my Heroes, here . 

To work a wonder, God would have her shown 

Tp-morrow, Julia, I betimes must rise 

Touch but thy Lire (my Harrie) and I heare 

Tread, Sirs, as lightly as ye can 

True mirth resides not in the smiling skin 

True rev'rence is (as Cassiodore doth prove) 

True to your self, and sheets, you' I have me swear 

Trust me Ladies, I will do . . 

Truth by her own simplicity is known 

Truth is best found out by the time, and eyes 

Tumble me down, and I will sit 

'Twas but a single if ose 

'Twas Cesars saying : Kings no lesse Conquerors i 

'Twas not Lov's Dart .... 

Twice has Pudica been a Bride, and led . 

Twilight, no other thing is. Poets say 

Twixt Kings .and Subjects ther's this mighty odds 

'Twixt Kings & Tyrants there's this difference known 

Twixt Truth and Errour, there's this difference known 

Two instruments belong unto our God 

Two of a thousand things, are disallow'd . 

Two parts of us successively command 

Two things do make society to stand 

Under a Lawne, then skyes more cleare . 

Upon her cheekes she wept, and from those showers 

Vineger is no other I define .... 
Virgins promis'd when I dy'd .... 
Virgins, time-past, known were these 

Want is a softer Wax, that takes thereon 
Wanton Wenches doe not bring 
\yantons we are ; and though our words be such 
Wash clean the Vessell, lest ye soure 



Index of First Lines, 443 



Wash your hands, or else the fire . 
Wassaile the Trees, that they may beare . 

Water, water I desire 

Water, Water I espie 

We are Coheires with Christ ; nor shall His own 

^A^e blame, nay we despise her paines 

We credit most our sight ; one eye doth please 

We merit all we sufEer, and by far . 

We pray 'gainst Warre, yet we enjoy no Peace 

We read how Faunus, he the shepheards God . 

We Trust not to the multitude in Warre . 

We two are last in Hell : what may we feare . 

Weepe for the dead, for they have lost this light 

Weigh me the Fire ; or, canst thou find . 

Weelcome ! but yet no entrance, till we blesse 

Welcome, Great Cesar, welcome now you are 

Welcome Maids of Honour .... 

Welcome, most welcome to our Vowes and us . 

Welcome to this my Colledge, and though late . 

Well may my Book come forth like Pubhque Day 

Were I to give thee Baptime, I wo'd chuse 

Were there not a Matter known 

What are our patches, tatters, raggs, and rents 

What can I do in Poetry .... 

What can my Kellam drink his Sack 

What Conscience, say, is it in thee . 

What ever men for Loyalty pretend 

What Fate decreed. Time now ha's made us see 

What God gives, and what we take . 

What here we hope for, we shall once inherit . 

What I fancy, I approve .... 

What is a Kisse ? Why this, as some approve . 

What is't that wasts a Prince ? example showes 

What need we marry Women, when 

What needs complaints ..... 

What now we like, anon we disapprove . 

What off-spring other men have got 

What others have with cheapnesse seene, and ease 

What sweeter musick can we bring 

What though my Harp, and Violl be 

What though the Heaven be lowring now 

What though the sea be calme ? Trust to the shore 

What times of sweetnesse this faire day fore-shows 

What was't that fell but now .... 

What will ye (my poor Orphans) do 

What Wisdome, Learning, Wit, or Worth 

What's got by Justice is establisht sure . 

What's that we see from far ? the spring of Day 

Whatever comes, let's be content withall 

Whatsoever thing I see ..... 

When a DafiadiU I see ..... 



444 Index of First Lines. 



When a mans Faith is frozen up, as dead 

When after many Lusters thou shalt be . 

When age or Chance has made me blind . 

When all Birds els do of their musick faile 

When as in silks my Julia goes 

When as Leander young was drown'd 

When ere I go, or what so ere befalls 

When ere my heart, Love's warmth, but entertaines 

When feare admits no hope of safety, then 

When first I find those Numbers thou do'st write 

When flowing garments I behold 

When I a ship see on the Seas 

When I a Verse shall make . 

When I behold a Forrest spread 

When I behold Thee, almost slain . 

When I consider (Dearest) thou dost stay 

When I departed am, ring thou my knell 

When I did goe from thee, I felt that smart 

When I goe Hence ye Closet Gods, I feare 

When I love, (as some have told 

When I of Villars doe but heare the name 

When I shall sin, pardon my trespasse here 

When I through all my many Poems look 

When I thy Parts runne o're, I can't espie 

When I thy singing next shall heare 

When Julia blushes, she do's show . 

When Julia chid, I stood as mute the while 

When Lawes full power have to sway, we see . 

When man is punisht, he is plagued still . 

When my date's done, and my gray age must die 

When my off' ring next I make 

When once the sin has fully acted been . 

When once the Soule has lost her way 

When one is past, another care we have . 

When others gain much by the present cast 

When out of bed my Love doth spring . 

When some shall say, Faire once my Silvia was 

When that day comes, whose evening sayes I'm gone 

When thou do'st play, and sweetly sing . 

When Thou wast taken. Lord, I oft have read . 

When times are troubled, then forbeare ; but speak 

When to a House I come, and see . 

When to thy Porch I come, and (ravisht) see . 

When we 'gainst Satan stoutly fight, the more 

When well we speak, & nothing do that's good 

When what is lov'd, is Present, iGve doth spring 

When Winds and Seas do rage 

When with the Virgin morning thou do'st rise . 

When words we want, Love teacheth to endite . 

Where God is merry, there write down thy fears 

Where love begins, there dead thy first desire . 



PAGE 



Index of First Lines. 445 



Where others love, and praise my Verses ; still 

Where Pleasures rule a Kingdome, never there . 

Whether I was my selfe, or else did see . 

While Fates permits us, let's be merry 

While leanest Beasts in Pastures feed 

While, Lydia, I was lov'd of thee . 

While the milder Fates consent 

While thou didst keep thy Candor undefil'd 

White as Zenobias teeth, the which the Girles 

White though ye be ; yet, Lillies, know . 

Whither dost thou whorry me 

Whither, Mad Maiden wilt thou roame ? - 

Whither ? Say, whither shall I fly . 

Who after his transgression doth repent . 

Who begs to die for feare of humane need 

Who formes a Godhead out of Gold or Stone 

Who may do most, do's least : The bravest will 

Who plants an Olive, but to eate the Oile ? 

Who, railing, drives the Lazar from his door 

Who read'st this Book that I have writ . 

Who to the North, or South, doth set 

Who violates the Customes, hurts the Health 

Who will not honour Noble Numbers, when 

Who with a little cannot be content 

Whom sho'd I feare to write to, if I can . 

Why doe not all fresh maids appeare 

Why doe ye weep, sweet Babes ? can Tears 

Why do'st thou wound, & break my heart ? 

Why I tye about thy wrist 

Why, Madam, will ye longer weep . 

Why sho'd we covet much, when as we know 

Why so slowly do you move . 

Why this Flower is now call'd so 

Why wore th' Egyptians Jewells in the Eare 

Will ye heare, what 1 can say . 

Wilt thou my true Friend be ? 

With blamelesse carriage, I liv'd here 

With golden Censers, and with Incense, here 

Woe, woe to them, who (by a ball of strife) 

Women, although they ne're so goodly make it 

Words beget Anger : Anger brings forth blowes 

Wo'd I see Lawn, clear as the Heaven, and thin ? 

Wo'd I wooe, and wo'd I winne 

Wo'd yee have fresh Cheese and Cream ? . 

Wo'd ye oyle of Blossomes get ? 

Wrinkles no more are, or no lesse . 

Wrongs, if neglected, vanish in short time 

Ye have been fresh and green 
Ye may simper, blush, and smile 
Yee pretty Huswives, wo'd ye know 



44 6 index of First Lines. 

Yee silent shades, whose each tree here . 
You are a Lord, an Earle, nay more, a Man 
You are a Tulip seen to day .... 
You aske me what I doe, and how I live ? 
You have beheld a smiling Rose 
Y'ave laught enough (sweet) vary now your Text 
You may vow lie not forgett .... 
You say I love not, 'cause I doe not play 
You say, to me- wards your affection's strong . 
You say y'are sweet ; how sho'd we know 
You say, you love me ; that I thus must prove 
You see this gentle streame, that glides . 
Young I was, but now am old 



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